Behavioral Health

first_imgCommunity Counseling ProgramThe Community Counseling Program (CCP) uses a holistic approach to assist people with overcoming some of life’s most difficult challenges. The CCP team is composed of licensed clinicians who provide short-term, nonmedical counseling to individuals, couples and families. Some of our areas of specialty include, but are not limited to, grief and loss, marital issues, parent-child relationships, communication and anger management. CCP also provides case management services and suicide prevention outreach through the Marine Intercept Program. CCP has two convenient locations and referrals are accepted via phone and internet request through the CCP website. Walk-ins are also accepted. CCP can be reached on the west side at 703-432-6442 in Cox Hall, 24009 Montezuma Ave., Camp Barrett, and on the main side at 703-784-3523 in Little Hall, 2034 Barnett Ave.Consolidated Substance Abuse Counseling CenterThe Consolidated Substance Abuse Counseling Center (CSACC) provides a continuum of substance abuse treatment and prevention services that are individualized and tailored to meet the specific needs of Marines, retirees and their family members 18 years and older.Substance abuse treatment services are delivered in the form of group and individual sessions consisting of individual assessment and screenings, outpatient and intensive outpatient groups, relapse prevention groups, family support groups, individual counseling sessions and referrals to residential treatment programs. Our prevention services consist of early intervention groups and workshops that are tailored to meet the needs of individuals, units and commands. CSACC can be reached on the west side at 703-432-6442 in Cox Hall, 24009 Montezuma Ave., Camp Barrett, and on the main side at 703-784-3502 in Little Hall, 2034 Barnett Ave.Exceptional Family Member ProgramThe Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) is a mandatory enrollment program for active-duty personnel who have authorized family members with diagnosed medical or educational conditions. The primary goal of the program is to ensure that military sponsors are assigned to locations where services exist to support the Exceptional Family Member (spouse, child, stepchild, adopted child, foster child or a dependent parent) residing with the sponsor who may require special medical or educational services based upon a diagnosed physical, intellectual or emotional hardship. The program also provides support services to include respite care, educational and informational forums on various topics specific to persons with disabilities, and a support group and volunteer network to families. EFMP is on the main side at 122 Neville Road. For more information, call 571-931-0524 and on the west side of Cox Hall, 24009 Montezuma Ave., Camp Barrett, call 703-432-6442.Family Advocacy ProgramThe Family Advocacy Program (FAP) is a command-sponsored program that incorporates a multidisciplinary approach to preventing family violence and child abuse by protecting victims and providing prevention, education and treatment services. Through this approach, the FAP addresses risk factors; underlying causes and effects of family violence on both adult and child victims; and rehabilitation. Services provided on an ongoing basis include stress and anger management; relationship and communication workshops; conflict management; domestic violence groups for victims and offenders; and groups for children exposed to family violence. FAP also offers individual, marital and family counseling services. The Family Advocacy Program has two offices and can be reached on main side at 703-784-2570 in Little Hall, 2034 Barnett Ave., and on the west side at 703-432-6442 in Cox Hall, 24009 Montezuma Ave., Camp Barrett. The 24/7 FAP Victim Advocacy Helpline number is 703-350-1688.Family Readiness ProgramFamily readiness is a combat multiplier, as important as individual, equipment and combat readiness. It is the ability of the individual Marine and their family to successfully balance life, career and mission events through active and reserve service, and is supported by the enduring partnership between the unit’s Family Readiness Command Team and Marine Corps Community Services. It is an obligation between the Corps, the Marine and their entire family. The individual Marine is responsible and accountable for his personal and family readiness.The Unit Family Readiness Program is the responsibility of the commanding officer. Marine Corps Community Services (MCCS) is responsible for supporting the individual Marine, their family and the Unit Family Readiness Program. Contact your unit’s family readiness officer or the trainer at 703-634-2765 or 703-634-2678 or visit www.quantico.usmc-mccs.org/index.cfm/marine-family/family-readiness.Lifestyle, Insights, Networking, Knowledge and SkillsLifestyle, Insights, Networking, Knowledge and Skills (L.I.N.K.S.) is a volunteer, team-mentoring program designed by Marine Corps spouses. The program offers an orientation to the Marine Corps lifestyle, helping spouses, Marines, children, teens, parents and extended family members understand and adapt to the unique challenges military life often presents. While the curriculum targets those who are new to the Marine Corps community, the information is very beneficial at all levels of Marine Corps experience. For information, contact the trainer at 703-634-2663 or visit www.quantico.usmc-mccs.org.Military and Family Life Counselor ProgramThe Military and Family Life Counselor Program (MFLC) provides confidential short-term nonmedical counseling and psycho-education services to service members and their families. MFLCs offer flexible services and may meet for services on or off the installation. For more information, call 703-414-9882/9888.New Parent Support ProgramThe New Parent Support Program (NPSP) is a prevention and outreach program that offers in-home visits, parenting education, support groups, and information and referral for the Marine Corps community who are expecting a child or who are parenting young children up to 6 years old. It is designed to empower expectant and parents of all experience levels to meet the challenges of parenthood and military life. The NPSP Home Visitors are registered nurses, licensed social workers and licensed marriage and family therapists. The purpose of home visits is to provide individualized parenting education and support to parents of young children. The groups and classes include Understanding Pregnancy, Baby Boot Camp, breast-feeding support, Baby and Me, and Toddler Time. To learn more about NPSP’s many programs, contact the west side at 703-432-6442 in Cox Hall, 24009 Montezuma Ave., Camp Barrett, and on main side at 703-784-4248 in Little Hall, 2034 Barnett Ave.Women, Infants and Children ProgramThe Women Infants and Children Program (WIC) program is a special supplemental nutrition program for Women, Infants and Children. Military families who meet program requirements are eligible to receive services free of charge. Participants in the program receive vouchers for milk, eggs, cheese, juice, hot and cold cereal, dried beans, peas, fresh fruit and vegetables, peanut butter, formula and whole grains. WIC serves pregnant women and children from birth up to age 5. WIC services are available on Monday and Wednesday in the New Parent Support office in Little Hall, 2034 Barnett Ave. For more information, call 703-792-7319 or email pwcic@vdh.virgini.gov.last_img read more

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1990-1999

first_imgSept. 24, 1990: Last Standard Depot Level Maintenance on A7 Corsair at NADEP completed.May 24, 1991: NAS Jacksonville is presented Commander Installation Excellence Award for Best Base in the Navy in ceremonies at the Pentagon.September 1991: First SH-60 helicopter is assigned to HS-3 arrived on-station. It will eventually replace all SH-3 Sea King helicopters.May 21, 1993: Lt. Cmdr. Kathryn P. Hire is the first woman assigned to a Navy combat aircraft. She is assigned to Patrol Squadron VP-62 at NAS Jacksonville.Jan. 6, 1994: First F-14 Tomcats (two) arrive at NADEP Jacksonville for rework.Jan. 14, 1994: Patrol squadron VP-49 holds a disestablishment and 50th Anniversary Ceremony.April 19, 1996: Patriots’ Grove dedicated. Seventy-nine historic trees will memorialize Navy Medal of Honor recipients since World War II. Former U.S. Congressman Charles E. Bennett is the keynote speaker.Oct. 18, 1996: Hangar 30 is officially dedicated. The $24 million project was built by local construction firm Perry-McCall.June 19, 1997: HS-1 disestablishment ceremony is held.Nov. 20, 1997: Sea Control squadron VS-30 arrives at NAS Jacksonville from NAS Cecil Field.Nov. 24, 1997: Sea Control squadron VS-31 arrives at NAS Jacksonville from NAS Cecil Field.Dec. 12, 1997: Sea Control squadron VS-22 arrives at NAS Jacksonville from NAS Cecil Field.Dec. 16, 1997: Sea Control Wing Atlantic completes its move from NAS Cecil Field to NAS Jacksonville. Barnett Bank closes after 53 years aboard the station.March 31, 1998: VS-32 returns from deployment to its new home at NAS Jacksonville.Aug. 26, 1999: Squadron VQ-6 disestablishment ceremony.last_img read more

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County Council Discusses 2020 Strategic Plan

first_imgLos Alamos County Councilors, various County department directors and members of the public discuss the Council’s strategic plan for 2020 Tuesday night in Council Chambers at the Municipal Building. This plan includes a number of priorities, which touch on housing, transportation and parking, local business environment, commercial use, social services, infrastructure and open spaces. Other subjects Council agreed need to be address include appropriate County services, communication and working with Los Alamos National Laboratory and other partners. Photo by Kirsten Laskey/ladailypost.com Councilors and County administrators discuss the 2020 strategic plan during a meeting Tuesday night in Council Chambers. Photo by Kirsten Laskey/ladailypost.comlast_img read more

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Irvine Sellar: a true maverick

first_imgSource: Rex Shutterstock/Alan Davidson/SilverhubAs the property world scoffed over his vision for Europe’s tallest skyscraper, this “wonderfully unreasonable man”, as friends described him, stood firm and let nothing get in the way of building the 1,016 ft, 87-storey – and now fully let – tower.When Sellar died last February, the industry mourned the loss of a true legend, someone who had earned an enviable reputation for getting even the most ambitious and seemingly impossible projects off the ground.This year, Property Week intends to celebrate such ingenuity and brilliance with a special prize in Sellar’s honour at the Property Awards on 17 April at Grosvenor House. The Irvine Sellar Award, sponsored by WSP, will celebrate an entrepreneurial individual or company that has shaken up the market in the past year with a groundbreaking project or initiative.Have you pulled off a deal or secured a planning permission no one thought was possible, and that no one else could? Have you disrupted the sector with a new initiative, model or scheme that proved to be a game-changer?In other words, are you like the late, great Sellar himself: an outlier who does things differently and brilliantly? If the answer is yes – or if you know someone else who fits the description – we want to hear from you by 19 January, the deadline for entries.New for 2018: the Irvine Sellar award Calling all game-changers! We have introduced a new category to the Property Awards in honour of Irvine Sellar. He had what it takes to win. Do you?To enter please go to www.awards.propertyweek.comOf course, there is a certain irony about this award as it puts Sellar firmly in the property establishment, a place he never sought to be. Indeed, he revelled in his position as an outsider and in doing things everyone else in the industry believed could not be done.“I think he would have been both amused and delighted by the idea of this award being named after him,” says his son James, who has taken over the reins of Sellar Property Group since his father’s passing. “But more importantly, he would have enjoyed the fact that an award was being created for those in the industry who think outside the box and look at property from a different business perspective.Breaking the mould“He always enjoyed meeting people who thought differently and had a fresh and novel approach to business – whether it was property or any other sector. He liked to see individuals who broke the mould and were able to adopt a maverick, yet intelligent, approach to everything they did.”Even fellow business mavericks took their lead from Sellar. Media mogul Richard Desmond, who has also been bitten by the property development bug, knew Sellar better than most and the pair often traded advice and ideas.He always enjoyed meeting people who had a fresh approach to businessJames Sellar, Sellar Property Group“I knew and respected Irvine as a developer and a visionary for most of my business life,” says Desmond. “Irvine was a man who pursued a dream and refused to give up even in the face of practical difficulties and financial challenges. An award in Irvine’s honour could not be more appropriate because it reflects the need for maverick entrepreneurs to keep our cities full of life and innovation – and just reach that little bit higher.”PR adviser and long-time friend Baron Phillips agrees. “I think Irvine would have regarded an award commemorating his life and property work with a wry smile,” he says. “But in some ways, he would have also thought that such an award was fitting. After all, he rather relished being regarded as an industry maverick.“Under the deadpan face, Irvine would be secretly proud. He would have said ‘that’ll teach ‘em to think differently’, to realise anything is achievable if you want it enough and are prepared to go that extra mile. After all, that is the role of the impossible man.”Read our full tribute to Irvine Sellar hereThe operative phrase is ‘think differently’, says James Sellar. “I believe this award would give him a lot of pleasure as he would see it as a celebration of people like himself who applied a different set of values and thought process to an industry that can, at times, appear quite regimented.”Rag trade to richesThere was certainly nothing regimented about Sellar’s career. His life was one that added colour to an industry that can often be such a traditional and formulaic one.From rag trade to property riches, Sellar’s career in retailing and property stretched back more than 60 years. He was one of the fashion retailers at the heart of the Carnaby Street revolution and the ‘swinging London’ of the 1960s. Source: Rex Shutterstock/Alan Davidson/SilverhubThe success of his fashion brand Mates by Irvine Sellars (sic), the UK’s second-largest fashion chain, was born out of the street markets that once dominated UK towns and cities.After selling Mates to a South African investment group in 1981, Sellar moved into property and within a few years was heading up the Stock Exchange-quoted Ford Sellar Morris, which at its peak generated annual pre-tax profits of £25m and held a widely spread investment and development portfolio.Like many entrepreneurs, Sellar faced tough times too. Along with other companies in the sector, the 1991-93 property market crash hit his fortunes hard and Ford Sellar Morris went into administration. But Sellar picked himself up and started again.The turning point came in November 1998 when he and two partners acquired accountancy firm PwC’s headquarters at London Bridge.Plans for the skyscraper were released in April 2000. Few in or outside the property world thought it had any chance of being built.Bill Price, a director of engineering services firm WSP, worked on The Shard and recalls how hurdles would miraculously be overcome by Sellar.“He was a real presence in the room,” he says. “His office was arranged in such a way so he could see who was in his boardroom. He’d immediately gauge how significant that meeting was, then he’d go in and sit in his favourite spot, a seat no one else would dare sit in even if he was out of the office.Secret weapon“At crucial moments in any job, there are hurdles to be jumped and we felt like we had a bit of a secret weapon in Irvine. When the moment was right, he would step up and sort a problem out. I’ve been in meetings when Irvine walked in and said: ‘You know that issue we were talking about the other day? Well, I’ve seen so-and-so and I think you’ll find that problem has gone away.’ He was absolutely hands-on with the detail of a project when it really mattered.”Phillips attests to his ability to read people and his sheer tenacity. “He was street-smart and people-wise. I never met anyone who so easily combined common sense, intelligence, wit and sheer determination to succeed – and prove all the doubters wrong.”Perhaps it was his untraditional property background – street markets and retailing – or because he did not feel bound by property’s traditions, but Sellar was unlike anyone else in the business, adds Phillips.He was street-smart and people-wise. I never met anyone who so easily combined common sense, intelligence, wit and sheer determination to succeedBaron Phillips“To me Irvine was like his beloved Shard – a one-off,” he says. “He was often asked whether he would build another Shard. His response was always: ‘No, how could you?’ It was a unique building that you couldn’t replicate, rather like the man himself.”It is almost impossible to overstate what an achievement The Shard was. Even after planning consent was obtained, most believed Sellar would never be able to finance development, which he did after securing two major pre-lets and Qatari backing.The Shard was launched in July 2012 with a spectacular light show. Today, it is a popular tourist venue for those wishing to visit The View from The Shard. Meanwhile, the Shangri-La hotel runs at near capacity and the restaurants serve thousands of covers every week.High lifeFrom his office, Desmond enjoys the view of what has become one of London’s most iconic buildings every day. “His great project with The Shard was to change London’s skyline and make people’s lives that much more dramatic and interesting,” he says. “When others wondered if he might have picked the wrong time or the wrong side of the river, Irvine never wavered.”Price points to the Paddington Cube as another project that will one day be considered a visionary achievement. In December 2016, just months before his death, Sellar’s plans to develop the £775m, 19-storey building were approved by Westminster City Council.“Irvine wanted to put more iconic buildings next to railway stations and transform those historically tired areas,” says Price. “No one can doubt he did that with The Shard at London Bridge. The building kickstarted the entire regeneration of the South Bank. And I believe the Paddington Cube has capacity to transform that area too.”Commenting on the award, Price believes it would have raised the rarest of things in Sellar: a smile.“He didn’t smile that much, but I can see him allowing a little flicker of pride across his lips, as he realised his achievements were being recognised,” says Price. “He was immensely proud of The Shard, and it really wouldn’t have happened without him.”Suffice to say, thanks to that towering achievement no one is questioning Irvine Sellar’s vision anymore.last_img read more

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Fire At The Creeks Defeated

first_imgFirefighters from around the east end responded to a structure fire at the main house at The Creeks, Ron Perelman’s Georgica Pond estate in East Hampton, Sept. 28, 2018. Perelman, the billionaire investor and philanthropist who owns the nearly 60-acre estate, was not home at the time. No injuries were reported.A fire in the main residence of the property on Georgica Pond known as The Creeks caused extensive damage to the structure in the overnight hours between Friday and Saturday, September 27 and 28. The owners of the property, Ronald O. Perelman, the billionaire philanthropist who is also the owner of The Independent, and his wife, Anna Chapman, as well as members of their family, were not home at the time. The blaze, which broke through the roof of the residence, gutting the attic and causing extensive smoke, fire, and water damage to the second floor, required several fire departments from the South Fork to assist the East Hampton Fire Department in extinguishing it.Ken Cullum, fire marshal for East Hampton Village, said on Monday that, while the investigation into the cause of the fire is continuing, there was no indication of foul play being involved in its ignition. The fire, he said, started in the attic, with the cause still to be determined.East Hampton Fire Chief Gerald Turza Jr. was away for the weekend, but was briefed by his assistant chiefs when he returned to East Hampton on Monday. According to Chief Turza, “Second Assistant Chief Brian Stanis was first on the scene.” When Chief Stanis arrived, the fire had already pierced through the roof, and was licking up toward the sky. The full complement of the department’s equipment and men were brought to bear on the blaze. That included three fire engines, a hose truck, a tanker, a tower ladder truck, multiple fire police, and a heavy rescue unit.As the first assistant to arrive on the scene, Chief Stanis took command of the operation. The fact that the firefighters were inside the building, fighting the intense heat and smoke and flames, caused him to call in the Sag Harbor, Montauk, and Southampton rapid intervention teams, firefighters trained to get their comrades out of harm’s way if things should take a turn for the worse.Getting enough hoses in place to deliver water to the fire on the sprawling property was also an issue Chief Stanis tackled, with additional hose trucks being called in, along with additional manpower. Ultimately, Southampton, Springs, Montauk, and Sag Harbor provided additional boots on the ground, along with EMS units from East Hampton Village Volunteer Ambulance, Sag Harbor Volunteer Ambulance Corps, and the Montauk Fire Department Volunteer Ambulance Company.Three times the firefighters were called out of the building for fear that it was about to collapse. At those times, the main focus became delivering water from the tower ladder. A new piece of equipment, Chief Turza said, played a pivotal role at those moments: a FLIR system aerial thermal imaging system, that pinpoints the hot pockets in a fire, allowing the firefighters to direct water at the areas. The department obtained the FLIR system less than a month ago, the chief said.Each time the firefighters were pulled out, an assessment of the situation was done, and they were sent back in. “I was very proud of the assistant chiefs, the firefighters, the fire police, and the mutual aid workers,” Chief Turza said.Protecting lives is not the only thing firefighters do. “Life, safety, and property preservation” has always been a cornerstone of American fire departments, the chief said. As they fought the fire, firemen removed property to avoid further damage, as their credo calls for.It took about three hours to suppress the fire. Firefighters did not leave The Creeks property until after 4 AM.There were no injuries to firefighters, or to the staff members who were on the property when the fire broke out. “On behalf of Ronald and Anna, we want to thank all the brave local fire fighters and police for their extraordinary response,” read a statement from the Perelman family.t.e@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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Cargolux adds transpacific service

first_imgThe connection will be operated twice a week, with flights leaving from Hong Kong on Saturday and Monday to arrive in the Mexican capital on Sunday and Tuesday.The Monday flight will also include a stopover in Guadalajara (GDL), said Cargolux.Cargolux already offers westbound flights to six other North American destinations, including Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, Miami and New York.www.cargolux.comlast_img

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Happy birthday

first_imgClaudia Willis, middle, from Bonteheuwel, celebrated her 80th birthday on Wednesday September 14. Ms Willis was born in Johannesburg and was moved to a children’s home in Cape Town at the age of 15. She dreamt of being a nurse, but worked as a child minder in Pinelands, until she got married, and moved to Maitland. From there, she and her family moved to Bishop Lavis, and later to Bonteheuwel. Ms Willis had seven children, 15 grandchildren and nine great-great-grandchildren. Pictured with her, from left, are her friend Annie Jordan, 80, and her sister Phillippa East, 86.last_img read more

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Time for diversity targets?

first_imgJudicial diversity, or the lack thereof, is back in the headlines after Justice, an influential thinktank, lambasted the lack of progress in the three years since it recommended ‘targets with teeth’. Monidipa FouzderSource: Michael CrossAndrea Coomber, director of Justice, says the senior judiciary continues to be dominated by white men from the independent bar: ‘We are continually assured that change is right around the corner and yet the homogeneity of appointments to the key feeder roles of recorder and deputy High Court judge give little reason for optimism.’Justice repeats its call for targets. And a glaring issue is the lack of solicitors on the senior bench.Across legal practice, solicitors outnumber barristers nine to one. However, latest statistics show that solicitors are less represented among the judiciary than they were four years ago and currently represent roughly a third of all judges.Only four sitting High Court judges are solicitors. Sir Gary Hickinbottom is the only solicitor judge in the Court of Appeal. No solicitors currently sit in the Supreme Court.Despite there being more solicitors in the High Court than ever before, Justice says the decline in overall numbers of non-barrister judges is due partly to the high proportion of solicitor judges who leave the judiciary. In 2018/19, more non-barristers left the courts than joined. ‘We are unaware of any explanation for why non-barrister judges would leave the judiciary and how this might be correlated with different leaving patterns of other groups. This requires examination.’In 2018/19, solicitors made up 55% of applicants. However, in most legal exercises barristers are more likely to be recommended for appointment. Justice says solicitors are struggling to get appointed to two ‘key feeder roles’ to senior appointments: recorder and deputy High Court judge.In 2017/2018, solicitors represented 28% of applicants to be a recorder but 4% of recommendations (7% in 2018/19). Currently, only 6% of sitting recorders are solicitors. Of the 24 deputy High Court judges announced in November, six were solicitors. (Justice says the result is encouraging, but notes that all six were white male partners at big City firms.)It is unclear whether a solicitor’s experience in a complicated transaction would ever be preferred to the experience of a barrister appearing in the Supreme CourtIncreasing Judicial Diversity: An Update – Justice reportLaw Society president Simon Davis says Chancery Lane and its Solicitor Judges Division are determined to lead efforts to increase the number of solicitor judges. ‘We work closely with stakeholders including the Judicial Appointments Commission and the judiciary as well as with our members, to understand better the challenges faced by aspiring solicitor judges, and to support solicitors in preparation for the application process.’The Justice report and member feedback, he says, ‘suggests that the application process and selection materials might not properly weigh the legal experiences and skills which solicitors would typically possess’. Sarah Austin, a solicitor member of the Law Society Council, was recently nominated to the JAC Advisory Group – which, Davis says, ‘aims to ensure that the content of selection materials is not inadvertently advantageous to candidates from a particular legal background’.The president says a challenge solicitors face is lack of familiarity with the application process, the preparation required and with members of the judiciary. The Society is trying to help by providing networking and support to aspiring and sitting solicitor judges, facilitating shadowing opportunities, delivering judge-led workshops of the Pre-Application Judicial Education Programme, and running workshops to enhance application and interview performance.Justice urges ‘targeted outreach’, including using headhunters, to identify and pursue applications from strong solicitor candidates. Further examination of the competition exercises is required – where are solicitors dropping out and why? Justice says a ‘fundamental challenge’ is that the JAC exercises are a competition: ‘It is unclear whether a solicitor’s experience in a complicated transaction would ever be preferred to the experience of a barrister appearing in the Supreme Court or Court of Appeal.’The lord chief justice has said his scepticism about targets extends to principled opposition to quotas: ‘They are not compatible with appointment on merit nor, ultimately, in sustaining public confidence in the judiciary.’ Until the statistics back the judiciary’s efforts to improve diversity, the rest of the profession will remain sceptical about progress.last_img read more

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Solicitors lauded for LGBT+ inclusion work

first_imgThe legal profession is well represented in an annual compilation that celebrates professionals who have helped support LBGT people, with solicitors making up more than one in ten spots on one list.Today’s OUTstanding list, presented by the Financial Times newspaper, lists professionals who identify as LGBT+ who create positive workplaces for other LGBT+ people. The list is split into three categories – LGBT+ executives, ally executives and future leaders.In the LGBT+ executives list, at least 11 of the 100 are solicitors. They come from law firms including Clifford Chance, Herbert Smith Freehills and Allen & Overy.Clifford Chance has three of its lawyers across the lists. Partner Narind Singh is listed as an ‘LGBT+ executive’ while senior associates Eraldo d’Atri and Nathan Eastwood are in the ‘future leaders’ list. Other names include Ben Foat, group legal director at the Post Office (LGBT+ executives) and King & Spalding associate Krishna Omkar (future leaders).Laura King, global head of people and talent at Clifford Chance, said: ‘I’d like to congratulate Narind, Eraldo and Nathan for being named in this prestigious list of LGBT+ role models. Narind, Eraldo and Nathan have given generously of their time speaking at events, mentoring others, and driving aspects of Clifford Chance’s pro bono work in support of the LGBT+ community.’The FT has compiled the list since 2013. This year’s role models were nominated by peers and colleagues with the nominations then reviewed by an independent judging panel.Suki Sandhu, chief executive of INvolve, parent organisation of OUTstanding, said: ’We’re so proud to see so many senior and future leaders recognised as role models for their work driving cultural change and creating work environments where everyone can succeed.’last_img read more

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RF Test Bench for Contactless Cards & Mobile Payments Achieves EMVCo Qualification

first_imgKeysight Technologies and FIME today announced that the EMVCo global technical body has qualified the latest version of the FIME Radio Frequency (RF) test bench based on Keysight´s T1141A Test Set. The Test Bench verifies compliance of mobile handsets and contactless cards with EMV Level 1 Specifications.FIME, a leading provider of secure-chip consulting and testing services, will use the system to confirm that mobile and contactless card products perform as specified by the EMV™ Proximity Integrated Circuit Card (PICC) version 2.3 Specification.The qualification by EMVCo is the result of the successful cooperation between Keysight and FIME and enables both organizations to address the increasing market demand for advanced test equipment. In addition to EMV contact, contactless and mobile certification tools, laboratory expertise, and consulting services, FIME delivers training to use the RF test bench in-house and helps its customers to further understand the EMVCo Contactless Specifications and improve the performance of their product. This level of training assists customers in efficiently and effectively obtaining EMVCo certification for contactless cards and mobile devices. It also reduces the time needed for product qualification.FIME’s work with Keysight has focused on EMV Level 1 RF testing for mobile or contactless smartcards (PICC). Both organizations are actively working to address EMVCo requirements and complete qualification of their existing test solutions for payment terminals (Proximity Coupling Device). They offer easy upgrade paths for its customers to integrate EMVCo and NFC testing in their test systems.Informtion on on Keysight´s T1141A Test Set is not available on the Keysight website at the moment. Will updates this once it becomes available.last_img read more

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