It’s just too sad to be single: Single-stage tendering

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

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Low-carbon plan a reality with Prisk on board

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

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Clint Stoerner & K.J. Hill discuss his commitment to the Hogs

first_img Session ID: 2020-09-18:409d99656f73be7ae0c4827 Player ID: videojs-brightcove-player-804541-3756929783001 OK Close Modal DialogCaption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDoneClose Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Clint Stoerner & K.J. Hill discuss his commitment to the Hogs Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 0:00Loaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%0:00 Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1ChaptersChaptersdescriptions off, selectedDescriptionssubtitles off, selectedSubtitlescaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedCaptionsAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window. The Video Cloud video was not found. Error Code: VIDEO_CLOUD_ERR_VIDEO_NOT_FOUNDlast_img read more

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Dennis Rodman talks about the ‘always smiling’ Kim Jong Un singing karaoke, horseback riding

first_img Related ABC News.(NEW YORK) — Despite his decidedly non-governmental look and unusual diplomatic style, former NBA superstar Dennis Rodman has gotten more access to North Korea’s dictator than any other American.ABC News recently sat down with Rodman to talk about his unique relationship with perhaps the most mysterious leader in the world, Kim Jong Un.This past week, Rodman was on what he called a “humanitarian” tour of Asia, first in Guam pitching his proposal for a goodwill basketball game between North Korea and the U.S. territory, which Kim once threatened with a missile attack. The unlikely international diplomat was also recently in Beijing promoting talks between Kim and President Trump, whom Rodman knew as a one-time contestant on “The Apprentice.”During our interview in New York City, the towering 6-foot-7 former Chicago Bulls star was wearing his trademark sunglasses and a potcoin.com shirt, the company sponsoring his recent overseas trips. Potcoin is a crypto currency that can be used to buy legal marijuana. Five times Rodman has traveled to North Korea and three times has he met with the leader who has been a huge Chicago Bulls fan since he was a little kid. Perhaps it is ironic that the dictator of North Korea, who publically condemns America, just loves Frank Sinatra. According to Dennis Rodman, Kim Jong Un picked “My Way” on his Karaoke to sing it in Korean.“He’s pretty good,” Rodman said. “He had his girl band, 14 girls that travel with him everywhere to play his music… he was singing it in North Korean. There was like 70 people at this big round table, I’m like, ‘Wow.’ Everybody had their turn, had a shot of vodka, took a vodka shot and then try to sing karaoke.’” Rodman also provided more inside details about his discussions with the leader of North Korea, including his language talents, horse riding abilities and basketball skills.“Every time you see us talking like this, We are talking about basketball,” Rodman said. “One time, he said, ‘Dennis, I would love to go to New York, to Madison Square Garden. He says, ‘I’d love to go to New York, but I can’t…’ He says stuff like that.”Rodman has refused to discuss politics and had nothing to say about starvation and executions within North Korea. But he did tell us about some more personal impressions of the elusive North Korean leader. As journalists we have been trying to get an interview with Kim Jong Un ever since he took power in 2011 but so far he has refused. So as of now Dennis Rodman has become, unexpectedly, one of our very best sources into what makes Kim Jong Un tick.“He’s always smiling, man… He’s always smiling with his people, his sister, his brother,” Rodman said. “His family is so at ease when they’re around each other. Just like regular people.” Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.Powered by WPeMaticolast_img read more

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CENTER STAGE: Aurora launches trauma recovery center for all residents in…

first_imgAURORA | The city’s trauma recovery center at the former Hoffman Heights Library is currently bare bones.A few chairs line the main lounge area in the basement of the building, some children’s puzzles are scattered around what will become a play area, and a retro kitchenette is devoid of silverware and food.(From left to right) Aurora Strong Community Resilience Center Manager Grace Zolnosky, Disaster Coordinator for Aurora Mental Health Center Kristen Anderson, and Spokesperson for 7/20 Recovery Committee Karen Morales are excited to help trauma victims at the new community resilience center, June 13 near East 13th Avenue and Peoria Street. The vacant Hoffman Heights Library will house the center, which will offer free services including group counseling, individual counseling, and health and wellness activities such as yoga and Zumba classes. (Marla R. Keown/Aurora Sentinel)By the first anniversary of the July 20 theater shooting, plans are for the place to come to life. Colorful paintings will adorn the walls of the center, inspirational books will line bookshelves, and the counselor’s room will be cozy and inviting.People will be doing yoga, making art, playing pool, meeting with therapists and developing tools to cope with current and future traumatic experiences, said Karen Morales, spokeswoman for the 7/20 Recovery Committee.“This isn’t an exclusive place for those who have experienced a trauma,” Morales said. “It’s a place for anyone to come who wants to learn more about how the traumas of day-to-day life can affect us as individuals.”The Aurora Strong Community Resilience Center opened to victims of the theater shooting June 18 and will formally open to all Aurora residents on July 11.Free services will be offered at the center including exercise and art classes, and group and individual counseling. Staff at the resilience center will continue to add services at the request of victims and Aurora residents.“It’s important for us to solicit ideas from people to figure out what can help,” said Kristen Anderson, disaster coordinator for Aurora Mental Health Center. “Social support is the common thread, and I feel like this place can give them that.”Having a place to share feelings of grief and hope alongside other victims of the theater shooting is important, said Lasamoa Cross, who watched as her boyfriend AJ Boik was killed in the shootings. Cross said group therapy sessions with other victims of the theater shooting would be helpful for her.“It’s so much harder to talk to people that haven’t really experienced loss like this, or something as traumatic,” she said. “I think it’s magnificent because it’s one of those things where I can talk to those who were there, and that do understand.”Many victims of the theater shooting are supportive of the idea of the resilience center, Morales said. Some of them even plan on sharing their stories with other people who might be going through personal traumas, she said. Cross said she’d also be interested in that.“For those who have been there and are on the other side, part of their healing process is passing on that knowledge to those of us who have yet to go through something,” Morales said.The center takes up the entire basement of the former city library building near East Colfax Avenue and Peoria Street. The city is opening a youth center with a computer lab in the fall on the building’s main level. Large donations and grants covered the cost to keep the resilience center open and pay for staff salaries for 18 months. The cost was about $330,000.The plan for the center was loosely based off of “Columbine Connections,” a healing center for victims of the Columbine High School shootings and “Project Heartland,” a mental health services center for victims of the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing.Kevin Everhart, a psychologist and associate clinical teaching professor at the University of Colorado’s Department of Psychology said the resilience center is an innovative and “excellent” resource for the community.“This is something that can bring about positive change and help the community cope with and even come to thrive in the face of the 7/20 shootings,” he said in May. “This is a progressive step.”For many people, symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder don’t occur until months or even years after the tragedy or trauma. The resilience center will give people an opportunity to take advantage of services they might not even know they need, Everhart said.“We have evolved a great many mechanisms for shielding ourselves from anxiety and distress,” he said.Combining mental health services with active, exercise-focused activities at no cost will be hugely beneficial to the Aurora community, he said.Partners involved in the creation of the resilience center include the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora Mental Health and the city’s Parks, Recreation and Open Space department. Representatives from the Colorado Organization for Victims Assistance will have regular office hours at the center, and will also be conducting group victim support services.Reach reporter Sara Castellanos at 720-449-9036 or sara@aurorasentinel.com.The Aurora Strong Community Resilience Center is accepting donations of items including: news racks, coffee tables and side tables, coffee kiosks, regular-sized refrigerator and mini fridge, comfortable, oversized chairs, bookshelves and books. To donate, call Grace Zolnosky at 303-739-1580.last_img read more

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