It’s just too sad to be single: Single-stage tendering

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

Read More

Increasing number of medical specialists for Dominica

first_imgLocalNews Increasing number of medical specialists for Dominica by: Dominica Vibes News – May 6, 2015 Share 225 Views   one comment Share Sharecenter_img Sharing is caring! Tweet (L-R): Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Health, Helen Royer, Chief Medical Officer Dr David Johnson and Minister of Health and the Environment, Dr Kenneth DarrouxDominica is moving forward in increasing the number of specialist medical personnel available, permanent secretary in the Ministry of Health, Helen Royer has revealed.Royer made that announcement in her address at a press conference on Monday 6 May 2015 in which she highlighted recent achievements of the ministry.The lack of relevant specialist personnel has long been viewed as a challenge facing the island’s healthcare system. “Some of our achievements as it relate to post graduate and medical training; we were able to, throughout the last few years, to have sent seven medical doctors to qualify in various specialties”. “Actually, we have had two of them return, we have an Internist who has returned and has been providing significant assistance to the medical wards and Dialysis Unit,” Royer said. Royer added that one of the specialist personnel have returned to the island following training; including one who studied infection epidemiology.“Just [at] the end of April, we had one of the doctors who went to study, she is back and we’re expecting to benefit from her services”. Meanwhile, several other specialists being trained out of state.“We still have the Oncologist in training, another Internist and an orthopedic surgeon. We have been able to send four of this category of nurses to be trained. Two of them have returned. We have also sent three family nurse practitioners [for training] and two of them are back on island.”Royer stated that “significant progress” has been made in the area of policymaking as the framework to deliver quality care is of critical importance. A number of policies are at various stages of development, in pharmaceutical care, dental health, chronic non-communicable diseases (CNCDs) and HIV policy.The Ministry recently launched an infection control manual while a Nutrition Policy has been approved. “We have completed the Nutrition and School Health Policy and we are just waiting to pass it through to Cabinet for approval,” Royer said.last_img read more

Read More

Review: ‘Everest,’ a harrowing spectacle that lacks emotion

first_img This photo provided by Universal Pictures shows, Jake Gyllenhaal in a scene from the film “Everest.” (Jasin Boland/Universal Pictures via AP) Krakauer is a character in “Everest,” (“House of Cards’” Michael Kelly), but a peripheral, underdeveloped one. His presence as a journalist covering the expedition frames the growing tension between customer service and safety inherent in the commercialization of adventure. The script also uses him as a “why climb” observer. He can bluntly ask what the audience is thinking, and he does at one point. The scene goes nowhere, though. The other characters crack wise or choose silence, as though the desire to climb Everest is so unexplainable. “Because it’s there,” they say.So when a handful of climbers do make it to the peak, it’s harder to feel their euphoria. All we can see is looming death.That’s part of the problem of “Everest.” All the elements are there, but the emotions never land — even with the inclusion of previously private conversation between Rob Hall and his pregnant wife Jan (Keira Knightley) as his plight atop the mountain becomes direr.The large ensemble cast is packed with recognizable faces — Clarke, Brolin, John Hawkes, Jake Gyllenhaal, Emily Watson, Knightley, Sam Worthington, and on and on. It can be distracting, but perhaps it is the only way to truly orient an audience with who’s who. There’s not a lot of time to get to know the individuals before their faces are obscured with ski masks and goggles and they’re reduced to, and dependent on, our ability to recall the color of their snowsuits.Icelandic director Baltasar Kormákur (“2 Guns”) wrangles the story, characters, and beastly natural setting as best as he can. The film trots along briskly and hits beats with sitcom precision as we go from sea level to base camp to the ultimate ascent. There is some levity too, thanks to Gyllenhaal’s earthy expedition leader Scott Fischer, but mostly blunt foreboding.The scenes on the mountain are truly outstanding, and the 3-D is atmospheric, not gimmicky. You can almost feel the ice thrashing against the characters’ faces as the remarkable storm hits. A brief, thrilling scene with a helicopter is worth the price of admission alone.The grandiosity of the mountain, though, is juxtaposed with Kormákur’s odd choice to shoot many of the character scenes in extreme close-up. Unless you’re in the ideal center in an IMAX theater, the effect can be claustrophobic, and it does not make the emoting more effective. Instead, it detracts from the performances.Fictionalized accounts of real tragedy are not impenetrable. James Cameron made us feel for a ship full of characters we’d never met. “Everest” can’t break that seal, and it’s a handicap. Maybe there’s too much reverence. Maybe the story and the truth are supposed to be enough and anything else would have seemed exploitative. With 19 years of perspective and the technical ability to visually tell the story that we’ve all heard so many times at this point, though, it should have been more.“Everest” is a good movie, but it could have been a great one.“Everest,” a Universal Pictures release, is rated PG-13 by the Motion Picture Association of America for “intense peril and disturbing images.” Running time: 121 minutes. Two and a half stars out of four.___MPAA Definition of PG-13: Parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.___Follow AP Film Writer Lindsey Bahr on Twitter: www.twitter.com/ldbahr This photo provided by Universal Pictures shows, Jason Clarke as Rob Hall, who leads the expedition in the film “Everest.” The film debuts in IMAX/3D exclusively on Friday, Sept. 18, 2015, and opens wider in theaters the following week. (Universal Pictures via AP) “Everest” is not an easy movie to watch. No entertainment that contains such tragedy should be.The truly breathtaking spectacle and technical achievements can make you feel like you too are on a vertical slope at 29,000 feet. But this awe-inspiring movie is also one that’s laced with dread, little triumph and even less perspective as you wait, with a knotted stomach, for the disasters to manifest.“Everest” recounts the events of, and leading up to, May 10, 1996, when a series of controversial decisions and a heap of bad luck led to the deaths of 8 climbers — then the deadliest day in Everest history.It is not, however, based on the most famous account, journalist Jon Krakauer’s book “Into Thin Air.” It’s an amalgamation of stories, reports and never-before-heard tapes from the day, focused mostly though on Adventure Consultants lead Rob Hall (Jason Clarke), and Texan climber Beck Weathers (Josh Brolin). This photo provided by Universal Pictures shows, Jake Gyllenhaal, from left, as Scott Fischer, Michael Kelly as Jon Krakauer, and Josh Brolin as Beck Weathers, in the film “Everest.” The film debuts in IMAX/3D exclusively on Friday, Sept. 18, 2015, and opens wider in theaters the following week. (Jasin Boland/Universal Pictures via AP)last_img read more

Read More