Niagara Leadership Summit for Women comes to Brock Oct 18

The Niagara Leadership Summit for Women is taking place Saturday, Oct. 18 at Brock University.A joint initiative of YWCA Niagara Region and Brock, the community event – which is open to the public – presents an opportunity to discuss, evaluate, and celebrate women leaders locally and opens the conversation surrounding women’s issues in Niagara.Registration closes Oct. 10.“Our vision is that everyone, regardless of gender or economic status, should have the courage and confidence to be the leader they are and want to be in their community,” said Elisabeth Zimmermann, executive director of YWCA Niagara Region.The program will kick off with keynote speaker Kim Crosby, an award-winning multidisciplinary artist, activist and educator who will open the Summit with her talk, ‘Reimagining Transformative Leadership.’Discussion topics will include themes of women in politics and activism, networking for social impact, youth and student leadership and much more. Guest speakers hail from all corners of the region and bring a diverse range of experiences and insights to share with participants.“The Summit is about much more than the business of leadership,” said Julie Rorison, chair of the planning committee. “It’s about recognizing acts of leadership in our everyday lives and supporting the leaders all around us who make a difference every day.”The program will wrap up with closing keynote address by Wendy Southall, former police chief of the Niagara Regional Police Service. As the first female and first civilian police chief in Niagara, Southall will share her unique perspectives in community leadership.The Summit will offer valuable opportunities for women, girls and allies to connect, share common goals and evaluate common challenges, and network with like-minded community leaders.Cost is $15 per person from 8 a.m.-4 p.m., including lunch.For more information and to register, visit niagaralsw.ca and connect with us on Twitter @NiagaraLSW and Facebook.com/NiagaraLSW using #NiagaraLSW. read more

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J J to pay out 22 billion over false marketing and kickbacks

first_imgHEALTHCARE GIANT JOHNSON & Johnson is to pay $2.2 billion to settle allegations of false marketing of drugs and paying kickbacks to pharmacists and doctors for promoting and prescribing certain drugs that had not yet been approved as safe or effective.The US Justice Department announced the settlement at a press conference yesterday. Attorney General Eric Holder said the company – as well as three of its subsidiaries – lined its pockets at the expense of American taxpayers, patients, and the private insurance industry.“They drove up costs for everyone in the health care system and negatively impacted the long-term solvency of essential health care programs like Medicare,” he added.The global settlement resolves investigations involving antipsychotic drugs Risperdal and Invega and the heart drug Natrecor.In its plea agreement, Janssen admitted that it promoted Risperdal to healthcare providers for the treatment of psychotic symptoms and associated behaviours exhibited by elderly, non-schizophrenic patients who suffered from dementia – even though the drug was approved only to treat schizophrenia.In separately filed civil complaints, the government alleged that J&J and Janssen promoted Risperdal and Invega, a newer antipsychotic drug, to doctors – and to nursing homes – as a way to control behavioral disturbances in elderly dementia patients, children, and the mentally disabled.According to the complaints, Janssen was aware that Risperdal posed serious health risks for the elderly, including an increased risk of strokes, and for children, including the risk of elevated levels of prolactin, a hormone that can stimulate breast development and milk production.The New Jersey-based company said the agreements with federal authorities are not an admission of liability or wrongdoing. It expressly denied the government’s civil allegations.Read: Over 300 new jobs announced for DublinMore: Aer Lingus profits up, but Irish heatwave hampers short-haul performancelast_img read more

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