Debate Flares Over AI To Detect COVID-19 In Lung Scans

first_imgMedical staff perform a CT scan of a Covid-19 patient at Red Cross Hospital in Wuhan, China. STR/AFP/Getty ImagesHSNW News:A series of studies, starting as a steady drip and quickening to a deluge, has reported the same core finding amid the global spread of COVID-19: Artificial intelligence could analyze chest images to accurately detect the disease in legions of untested patients.Casey Ross writes in STAT that the results promised a ready solution to the shortage of diagnostic testing in the U.S. and some other countries and triggered splashy press releases and a cascade of hopeful headlines. But in recent days, the initial burst of optimism has given way to an intensifying debate over the plausibility of building AI systems during an unprecedented public health emergency.Source: homelandsecuritynewswire.comlast_img read more

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Gastech: Unprecedented Opportunities in LNG Shipping

first_img[mappress]Source: Gastech, March 25, 2014 Delegates to Gastech 2014 were told that there were enormous growth opportunities with the development of new technology and improved safety measures. “Today’s growth is completely unprecedented,” said Andrew Clifton, General Manager for the Society for International Gas Tanker and Terminal Operators. “We have more ships and terminals than ever before, and we currently have 400 vessels with over 100 more on order,” he said. “Within 3 to 4 years, we’ll have a fleet of over 500 LNG vessels in service. It’s certainly worth mentioning that, as recently as 1997, there were only 100 vessels in service.”Tamunoiyala Koko, Team Leader – Halifax for Lloyd’s Register, presented his risk assessment for LNGC ships transiting through the Panama Canal after the Panama Canal expansion project, which will accommodate most of the world’s LNG fleet and larger ships, and is expected to be completed in July 2015. “The HAZID project takes into account all credible scenarios and accidental evidence such as human error, mechanical failures, communications errors, extreme weather, and other possibilities,” Koko said. These incidents can result in possible LNGC ship grounding, and collision with other passing ships, including large vessels. The study was carried out from February 28 to March 2, 2012, looking at up to 170,000 cubic meter capacity ships with an estimated 100 LNG vessel transiting through the Panama Canal each year once the expansion is completed. “All of the scenarios considered had at most a medium risk,” he said. This risk is acceptable if sufficient controls are in place, according to the study. For 7 out of 11 medium risk hazards, no additional controls were necessary.KH Joh, Principal Engineer at Samsung Heavy Industries, introduced his company’s new membrane-type cargo containment system for LNG tankers, which has received approval in principle and general design approval from classification societies. The new design includes a reinforced corrugated primary membrane and more robust secondary membranes made of stainless steel for improved containment system integrity. The structural capacity for the sloshing load is enhanced, reducing the cargo filling limit. The new system will “increase the transportation efficiency” and “improve operational flexibility” for LNG carriers and offshore floating vessels, Joh said.Choi DongKyu, Deputy Director and Head of the Energy System R&D Team at Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering, discussed MEGI propulsion for LNG carriers, calling it an attractive way for achieving high fuel efficiency. “The system minimizes the conversion loss since the MEGI engine directly drives the propeller without any energy conversion. Despite its higher fuel efficiency, the system does have a disadvantage, requiring high pressure for fuel gas,” he said. Some amount of BOG must be left in the tank because of the low fuel consumption of MEGI consumption.Delegates who opened the Gastech 2014 technical stream conference on Tuesday morning paid their respects to Robert J. Lakey, Gastech’s longest-serving chairman, who passed away this year.last_img read more

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It’s just too sad to be single: Single-stage tendering

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

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Hansom: Unlikely stories

first_imgRich pickingsRussian-born billionaire oligarch Len Blavatnik has managed to get his name plastered across another British institution, after a £50m donation secured him naming rights to the Tate Modern’s extension Switch House, which has been renamed the Blavatnik Building. It comes hot on the heels of the Blavatnik School of Government in Oxford, which was shortlisted for last year’s Stirling prize. We couldn’t help but notice both schemes were designed by Swiss star architect Herzog & de Meuron, so perhaps Blavatnik could make it a hat-trick with a Blavatnik stand at fellow Russian oligarch Roman Abramovich’s planned gothic-style rebuild of Stamford Bridge? Don’t hold your breath: Blavatnik reportedly outbid Abramovich on a £200m Kensington manor four years ago so he could still be smarting.They’re history“Since the 1950s our cities have been blighted by modernism … modernism is not sustainable and does not satisfy modern residents.” Thus speaks a short film made by UKIP, bewailing the rise – literally – of what it calls “modern eyesores”. UKIP is the only political outfit so far to come out with an explicit architecture policy. With gloomy images of tall buildings, both erect and being demolished, the video promises the party will “discourage the construction of tower blocks”. Instead it will promote the building of “more sensible ‘community’ housing, like Poundbury”, the urban extension on the outskirts of Dorchester backed by the Prince of Wales. Sure, not everyone likes tower blocks, but UKIP’s stance is another example of how it would like us to live in the past. I’m all for buildings that reflect history (I’m from the past myself, after all …), but even I find Poundbury a little too traditional.Just the ticketAs a user of the UK’s maligned rail network, I often view the train travelling experiences of international acquaintances with considerable envy. Thus my jaundiced eye was recently drawn towards Japan, where a super-luxurious train, the Shiki-Shima, made its debut on 1 May. Running between Tokyo and the northern island of Hokkaido, the train – designed by Ken Kiyoyuki Okuyama – features viewing carriages, top of the range sleeping compartments, Michelin-starred chefs in the dining car, and a stunning lounge complete with open fire. Ticket prices range from £2,220 and £9,000 for a two or four-day trip, and while it can carry a mere 34 passengers, such has been the demand to let this particular train take the strain that journeys are sold out until March 2018. Southern Rail it most definitely isn’t.All’s well that ends WellSlough does not conjure up images of happy workers. If anything the Berkshire town is synonymous with Ricky Gervais’ BBC TV send-up of the drudgery of working life, The Office. But developers Landid and Brockton Capital are determined to change this with construction of office block the Porter Building – which is apparently targeting being the healthiest and happiest workplace in the UK under US wellbeing standard, Well Building. The PR puff declared the TP Bennett-designed scheme will “set the standard for future developments”. Come friendly love bombs and fall on Slough?Sign of the timesYou may remember the hoo-ha that erupted in 2014 over proposals for a Maggie’s cancer centre at Bart’s Hospital in London. The striking contemporary design by US architect Steven Holl incurred the wrath of Sir Marcus Setchell, the queen’s surgeon. He said the translucent zig-zag building was an unsuitable neighbour for James Gibbs’ 18th-century Great Hall and threatened a judicial review. He even brought in rival architect Michael Hopkins to advise. In the end a peace deal was brokered and work is now well under way. But given all that controversy, I was surprised to find on a recent visit to the hospital that an endorsement quote on the Maggie’s hoardings was signed by none other than Setchell.Send any juicy industry gossip to hansom@ubm.comlast_img read more

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News focus: legal aid protest escalates

first_imgCrown courts are facing major disruption following moves by solicitor practitioner groups to escalate their protest against cuts to criminal legal aid and a backlash from barristers against a deal with the Ministry of Justice.The government also faces the prospect of a legal challenge to the cuts, as the long-running dispute rumbles on over the government’s quest for £220m in savings.The London Criminal Courts Solicitors’ Association (LCCSA) revealed last week it had received ‘positive advice’ from counsel with regard to ‘challenging the MoJ’s response to the [Next Steps] consultation by way of judicial review’.The action will be taken in the name of the LCCSA and the Criminal Law Solicitors’ Association (CLSA). The groups have set up an online fighting fund to gather support to reduce the financial risk to their officers, who will be personally liable for costs should they lose. They suggest donations of £250 per firm and individual contributions of £20.The Law Society said it had not been formally approached, but chief executive Desmond Hudson said it would be ‘delighted to consider’ any request for financial support. If that happens, he said, the Society will consider it and make a decision in accordance with its governance procedures.Last week solicitors joined forces with probation staff to stage a two-day walkout. The action came in the wake of a deal struck between bar leaders and the MoJ postponing 6% cuts to the advocates graduated fee scheme (AGFS). In return, the Criminal Bar Association (CBA) agreed to suspend direct action, which has included a ‘no returns’ policy of not picking up cases returned by double-booked barristers.At a meeting during last week’s protest, solicitors from the LCCSA and CLSA agreed to refuse work in new Crown court cases from today. The ‘no to Crown court’ policy seeks to build on action taken by the bar, which solicitor groups felt had been a ‘significant bargaining tool’ in negotiations with the MoJ.The LCCSA stressed it remains up to individual solicitors to decide whether to adopt the policy.The deal agreed with the MoJ by the CBA and five of the six circuit leaders (the northern circuit did not support it) prompted criticism from barristers, chambers and solicitors, who felt the bar leaders had capitulated to a ministry that had been rattled by the profession’s united action.The backlash prompted the CBA to ballot its members on whether to continue protest action until all the cuts and contracting reforms are abandoned. The vote, which opened last Wednesday, closes at 6pm on 9 April. Writing to CBA members to encourage a ‘full turnout’, the circuit leaders said: ‘The answer to the ballot will shape both CBA policy and the landscape of the criminal bar for years to come.’They told barristers that the ‘settlement’ with the MoJ did not imply that they accepted there should be any cuts.The circuit leaders rejected the notion that they had ‘done the solicitors’ profession a disservice’, stating that 30% of AGFS work is carried out by higher-court advocates, who will benefit from the deferred cuts.They said: ‘It is not in our interests to abandon those solicitors who are working to preserve the system in which both branches of the profession believe.’ They pledged to ‘continue to do what we properly can to support the opposition to dual contracts, the reduction in contract numbers, and further proposed cuts’.Commenting on the bar’s stance, LCCSA president Nicola Hill said: ‘Of course we’re disappointed with the leaders’ actions, but we have been encouraged by the reaction from rank- and-file barristers and chambers. This is not over yet.’James Gray, a barrister at Dyers Building, who attended the protest last week, told the Gazette the deal with the ministry ‘exposed’ the fact that some barristers had merely taken action in relation to their fees, rather than fighting for access to justice.‘The problem now is that Grayling has divided the bar. The unity has gone. Solicitors and probation staff will be left on their own.’ In addition, he said the bar’s action had ‘weakened the bargaining position of solicitors’.Young Legal Aid Lawyers, which includes barristers and solicitors, issued a statement on its website expressing ‘dismay’ at the CBA’s ‘unilateral action’. It warned that the deal, which it said ‘simply postpones the implementation of the cuts’, will not benefit junior barristers in the long term.‘If fee cuts affecting solicitors proceed, as we understand they will, then it seems likely that many criminal law firms will be forced to close. This will not be good for solicitors, for the bar or for our clients,’ it said.Cuts of 8.75% were implemented for solicitors undertaking police station and magistrates’ court work this month. A second tranche of 8.75% cuts is due to come in with the new criminal contracts in summer 2015.Barristers doing very high cost cases (VHCC) experienced 30% fee cuts in December. Since then many barristers have returned VHCCs and refused to accept new cases, leaving publicly funded defendants unrepresented in seven trials.As part of the MoJ deal, the CBA dropped its objection in principle to barristers undertaking VHCC work, but stressed it remains a matter of choice for individual barristers.Whatever the outcome of the ballot, some barristers have indicated that they will continue to refuse VHCC work.If the vote goes in favour of continued protest action, the deal postponing the fee cuts will be off. A spokeswoman for the MoJ told the Gazette: ‘The agreed package will need to be delivered in full by all sides.’Meanwhile, as the dispute continues, the bar’s regulator the Bar Standards Board began consulting on proposals that could make it harder for barristers to return cases on the basis of fee reductions.Revised guidance states that barristers will have to continue in cases where returning instructions will have a ‘disproportionate impact on the lay client, administration of justice or public interest’.The BSB said it was concerned that previous guidance had not adequately addressed regulatory risks such as the detriment to clients who found themselves without representation through no fault of their own.last_img read more

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Outsiders to help FS restructure

first_imgCONSULTANTS are due to submit bids on October 8 for a contract worth up to 2·5bn lire to help Italian State Railways with restructuring. Whoever wins this enviable little task will have their work cut out, but as a consultant they will have the benefit of being one step removed from the less enviable job of putting the restructuring into practice.At least a start has been made. About 40% of the FS infrastructure assets have been transferred to FS subsidiary business ASA Rete which may one day be floated off as a genuinely separate company. To start with ASA Rete has 52000 former FS employees, which will later fall to 41600 as some staff take voluntary redundancy and others are split among the three operating companies into which the rest of FS is being divided – a process due to be complete by the year end, according to FS President Giancarlo Cimoli. In 1998 ASA Rete’s costs will total 4844bn lire, but income from track access charges will only amount to 1355bn lire. State grants of 3100bn lire will cover most of the gap.Further details of the track access charging regime are emerging (RG 8.98 p495). Charges will be based on a fixed element (not applied on low-density routes), and a variable element based on wear and tear, speed, time of day and traffic density. Agreement on the amounts and the structure has been reached by the parties involved, but as ever, all must be approved by the cabinet.In contrast, uncertainty appears to be have been dispelled over the remaining parts of the north-south high speed trunk line with the government announcing at the end of July the ’final go-ahead’ for the last 13 km of the Bologna – Firenze line and the 64 km Parma – Bologna section, on which work is to start at the end of the year. Roberto Renon, Managing Director of TAV, the FS subsidiary with overall responsibility for high speed lines, described July 31 as ’an historic day’, saying that the entire Milano – Napoli route is now cleared for construction.Substantial changes have been made to the alignment of the Milano – Bologna alignment, with 130 out of 180 km now to be built parallel to the A1 motorway and 10 km close to the present main line. Eight interconnections totalling 100 km will provide links to the rest of the FS network, and a single intermediate station will be built at Reggio Emilio. Total cost of the line is put at 6000bn lire.So it seems certain that the vertical part of the big T will be finished, but the cross-bar may never be. Following the abandonment of a proposed high speed Milano – Genova link, it seems that the high speed line from Milano to Torino is to be ditched too. In a review of outstanding projects, Cimoli said that ’this organisation’s priority is the construction of a new line between Italy and Switzerland’, with the choice resting on a link from Milano that would meet the Swiss Gotthard base tunnel. This effectively means the end of further work on the proposed Lyon – Torino base tunnel too – which would have been even harder to justify. olast_img read more

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Samsung blames faulty batteries issues for Note 7 fires

first_imgSamsung blames faulty batteries issues for Note 7 firesSamsung has blamed two separate battery issues for causing the Galaxy Note 7 device to overheat and catch fire last year, a fault that led to the global recall of millions of devices.At a press conference on Monday, Samsung officials said exhaustive tests on tens of thousands of devices and batteries had ruled out any problems with the device’s hardware or software.Samsung said in a statement that Internal and independent investigations ‘concluded that batteries were found to be the cause of the Note 7 incidents’.‘We sincerely apologise for the discomfort and concern we have caused to our customers,’ Koh Dong-Jin, the head of its mobile business, said bowing before hundreds of reporters and cameramen at a press conference in Seoul, Mail Online reports.The first issue was that the battery components in the Galaxy Note 7 did not fit in the battery’s casing, causing the battery cell’s upper right corner to be crimped by the casingThe second round affected the devices sent to replace the original faulty phones.These were caused by manufacturing issues, including poor welding at the battery manufacturer.Samsung said that it had deployed around 700 researchers and engineers on its investigation, testing more than 200,000 fully-assembled devices and more than 30,000 batteries.Kevin White, principal scientist at Exponent said that Battery A had a design issue that pushed down the right corner of the battery, while Battery B had defective internal welds.Samsung acknowledged that it provided the specifications for the batteries, adding in its statement: ‘We have taken several corrective actions to ensure this never happens again. The lessons of the past several months are now deeply reflected in our processes and in our culture.’ This according to Mail Onlinelast_img read more

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London hit by power outage in suspected national grid failure

first_imgA suspected failure in the U.K.’s national grid on Friday led to a brief power outage across the country, UK Power Networks said.“We’re aware of a power cut affecting a large area of London and South East. We believe this is due to a failure to National Grid’s network, which is affecting our customers,” UK Power Networks tweeted.The brief power interruption caused disruptions to a large number of train services, with some traffic lights also shutting down.Transport authorities however confirmed that power had been restored and normal service was expected to resume shortly.In the period when power was out, police officers were deployed to help guide traffic on the roads in order to avoid congestions.Tens of thousands of homes across swathes of London and the South East were affected by the power cut.Related SA’s national bird under threat due to power lines Power restored in some parts of Kenya after major outagecenter_img ZIMBABWE POWER TRANSITIONlast_img read more

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Chairman demands public apology from councilor

first_imgLocalNews Chairman demands public apology from councilor by: – July 31, 2012 162 Views   3 comments Share Tweet Sharing is caring!center_img Share Chairman of the Canefield Urban Council, Simeon Albert.Chairman of the Canefield Urban Council, Simeon Albert, has demanded a public apology and withdrawal of statement from a member of the council who he claims has defamed his character.Justina James allegedly called a local radio talk show program on 10th March, 2012 and made public statements regarding the manner in which the chairman conducts the affairs of the council.Albert believes these statements were defamatory and inaccurate and has therefore issued a letter through his attorney, demanding an apology.According to a letter dated July 26th, 2012, the statements made by James could be understood to mean that “our client was involved in illegal and corrupt practices at the said Urban Council and further, that his conduct has brought the said Council into disrepute”.It further quotes the statements which James made during the program.“‘the Chairman has a habit of changing what he wants on the Minutes and that is our problem. Before the Minutes goes up to be gazette, he changes what he wants to change…he comes in and he scrutinizes the Minutes and he changes what he wants to change because it has to be gazette information…’”Albert has denied these allegations and has demanded financial compensation, among other remedies as James’ statements has “injured our client’s reputation and have lowered him in the esteem of the general public”.He is seeking; “a withdrawal of the said allegation, a written apology for the malicious, intentional and or reckless act of slander and a publication of the apology both on television and radio mediums. We further demand reasonable financial compensation to our client”.The letter further indicates that if James does not provide “full settlement” of these demands within seven (7) days, legal action will taken against her.James confirmed to Dominica Vibes News that she has been served with the letter demanding withdrawal of the statements; however she did not wish to comment further.“I don’t want to talk about that because we have a court matter,” she said. Dominica Vibes News Sharelast_img read more

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US deports over four hundred thousand criminals

first_img Share NewsRegional US deports over four hundred thousand criminals by: – December 27, 2012 20 Views   2 comments Tweet Sharecenter_img The United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency (ICE) has revealed that over four hundred thousand people have been deported from the country in 2012.The end of year removals as they are referred to by the Agency, highlights trends that underscore the administration’s focus on removing convicted criminals and other individuals that fall into priority areas for enforcement. In the fiscal year 2012 ICE’s Office of Enforcement and Removal Operations removed 409,849 individuals of Caribbean decent and other countries worldwide. Of these, approximately 55 percent, or 225,390 of the people removed, were convicted of felonies or misdemeanors – almost double the removal of criminals in fiscal year 2008. This includes 1,215 aliens convicted of homicide; 5,557 aliens convicted of sexual offenses; 40,448 aliens convicted for crimes involving drugs; and 36,166 aliens convicted for driving under the influence.With a view to focusing resources on the most serious criminal offenders, ICE also issued new national detainer guidance.This guidance limits the use of detainers to individuals who meet the department’s enforcement priorities and restricts the use of detainers against individuals arrested for minor misdemeanor offenses such as traffic offenses and other petty crimes, helping to ensure that available resources are focused on apprehending felons, repeat offenders and other ICE priorities. It is applicable to all ICE enforcement programs, including Secure Communities.“Smart and effective immigration enforcement relies on setting priorities for removal and executing on those priorities,” said Director Morton in a press release. “In order to further enhance our ability to focus enforcement efforts on serious offenders, we are changing who ICE will issue detainers against.While the FY 2012 removals indicate that we continue to make progress in focusing resources on criminal and priority aliens, with more convicted criminals being removed from the country than ever before, we are constantly looking for ways to ensure that we are doing everything we can to utilize our resources in a way that maximizes public safety.” Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Janet Napolitano also directed ICE to focus its resources on key priorities in all aspects of its immigration enforcement efforts.ICE did not specify how many of the deportees were Caribbean nationals.Dominica Vibes News Sharing is caring! Sharelast_img read more

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