Saddle relief with Bellwether Physio Pro Chamois

first_imgFeatured in the Bellwether Chronos Bib and Chronos Shorts from Profile Design, comes the new Physio Pro Chamois.The new Physio Pro Chamois includes a range of new features, the main benefit being the inclusion of ‘spacerknit technology’.Commenting on the Bellwether spacerknit technology, Brian Cameron Product Developer for Bellwether Clothing said, “The benefit of this over a traditional foam is that it has an open construction, so it allows moisture to be transferred away from the body a lot quicker; also, increasing ventilation over a traditional foam.’Coming in a pre-formed shape, sown into the Chronos Bib and Shorts, the Physio Pro Chamois also has a perineal relief channel and relief zones to maximise comfort.The Bellwether Chronos Elite CS Shorts have an MSRP of US$119.99. Features include: • Physio Pro Chamois • Multi-zone construction • Ribbed surface • 4D high-density chamois • Laser cut, stretch band on hem • Flat-locked seams • Ergonomic eleven-panel designwww.profile-design.com/bellwether/ Relatedlast_img read more

Read More

SM East students hoping to convince district to allow for Mission Valley library letters on outside of school

first_imgKathi Knop helped save the Mission Valley library letters from demolition.A group of SM East students are waiting to find out whether their efforts to get the Shawnee Mission School District to allow the installation of the “Library” letters from the outside of Mission Valley Middle School on SM East’s exterior.The idea to have the letters installed at SM East came late last fall, when former Mission Valley librarian Kathi Knop worked with the Tutera Group to have the signage removed and preserved prior to the demolition of the school. Knop had checked with school officials about the idea before asking to have the letter salvaged, and said they were open to the idea.But when district administrators received the work order request to have them put up on SM East’s exterior, the district denied the request on the grounds that it would have created an inconsistent look among the exteriors of the high schools.A group of four current SM East students asked the school board last week to reconsider the district’s decision, pointing out that the exteriors of the high schools have a number of different features. Moreover, they noted, there is already exterior signage at SM East noting the location of the performing arts facility and the gymnasium. The letters have special significance to members of this year’s senior class, which was the last group of students to attend Mission Valley before it was closed in 2011.One of the students, SM East Student Council President Kyle Baker, said late last week that he and his peers were still waiting to get a response from the district on their request. Meanwhile, school officials have reached out to them with a plan to install the letters inside the library instead. Baker said he thought the interior plan was a “great alternative to putting them on the outside of the building.” Their preference remains to have them installed on the exterior, “but we understand there are many factors to consider.”Principal John McKinney said the administration wants to find a way showcase the letters.“We recognize and appreciate the significance of the MV library letters to our community and want to display them in such a way that they will benefit our students now and for many years to come,” he said.SM East’s theatre facility has exterior lettering.last_img read more

Read More

How laughter makes you a better worker

first_imgCould laughing be a way to build a stronger, more creative team culture in the workplace?Since the global economic downturn in 2008, many of us may feel that laughing in the office might send a signal that we don’t have enough to do. Discussions that might previously have been conducted in person at a colleague’s desk increasingly take place over e-mail or Slack. In that context, office chatter can at times seem unnecessary.But what if, rather than signalling inactivity, laughing together is something that improves team collaboration and stimulates innovation?After years of not paying much attention to laughter, scientists are starting to reach that very conclusion. Read the whole story: BBC More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

Read More

APA: Majority Of Adults Stressed By Mass Shootings

first_imgAPA News: WASHINGTON, D.C. — A large majority of adults in the United States are stressed by mass shootings, and a third of U.S. adults say that fear of mass shootings stops them from going to certain places and events, according to a new survey on stress and mass shootings by the American Psychological Association.  Methodology Hispanic adults (32%) are more likely than white non-Hispanic adults (15%) to say they experience stress often or constantly related to the possibility of a mass shooting. Hispanic adults and African American adults also are more likely than white non-Hispanic adults to say they do not know how to cope with the stress they feel as a result of mass shootings (44% of Hispanic adults and 43% of African American adults vs. 30% of white adults). Black adults are more likely to feel that they or someone they know will be a victim of a mass shooting (60% compared with 41% of white adults and 50% of Hispanic adults). For additional information on stress and behavioral health, visit www.apa.org/helpcenter. Join the conversation about stress on Twitter by following @APA and #stressAPA.  To download related graphics, and for information on managing distress in the aftermath of a mass shooting, visit www.stressinamerica.org. Women report feeling stressed more often than men about the possibility of a shooting (85% vs. 71%), and parents of children under the age of 18 are nearly twice as likely as those without children under 18 to say they experience stress often or constantly because of the possibility of a mass shooting (28% vs.16%). Further, 62% of parents say they “live in fear that their children will be victims of a mass shooting”.  The survey found that more than three-quarters of adults (79%) in the U.S. say they experience stress as a result of the possibility of a mass shooting. Additionally, many adults report that they are changing their behavior due to fear of mass shootings. Nearly one in three adults (32%) feel they cannot go anywhere without worrying about being a victim of a mass shooting, while just about the same number (33%) say fear prevents them from going to certain places or events. Nearly one-quarter (24%) of adults report changing how they live their lives because of fear of a mass shooting.  All sample surveys and polls, whether or not they use probability sampling, are subject to multiple sources of error that are most often not possible to quantify or estimate, including sampling error, coverage error, error associated with nonresponse, error associated with question wording and response options, and post-survey weighting and adjustments. Therefore, the words “margin of error” are avoided, as they are misleading. All that can be calculated are different possible sampling errors with different probabilities for pure, unweighted, random samples with 100% response rates. These are only theoretical because no published polls come close to this ideal.center_img “It’s clear that mass shootings are taking a toll on our mental health, and we should be particularly concerned that they are affecting the way many of us are living our daily lives,” said Arthur C. Evans Jr., PhD, APA’s chief executive officer. “The more these events happen in places where people can see themselves frequenting, the greater the mental health impact will be. We don’t have to experience these events directly for them to affect us. Simply hearing about them can have an emotional impact, and this can have negative repercussions for our mental and physical health.” The results of this survey come in advance of the findings of APA’s annual Stress in America™ survey, which will be released this fall. To better understand the impact of mass shootings on stress and health in the aftermath of the recent tragic El Paso and Dayton shootings, APA commissioned the nationally representative survey. It was conducted online by The Harris Poll between Aug. 8 and 12 among 2,017 adults ages 18 and older who reside in the U.S.  This survey was conducted online within the United States between Aug. 8 and 12, 2019, among 2,017 U.S. adults (ages 18 and older) by The Harris Poll on behalf of the American Psychological Association via its Harris On Demand omnibus product. Figures for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, region and household income were weighted where necessary to bring them into line with their actual proportions in the population. Propensity score weighting was used to adjust for respondents’ propensity to be online. When asked which places they are stressed about the possibility of a mass shooting occurring, adults most commonly say a public event (53%), mall (50%), school or university (42%) or movie theater (38%), with only one in five (21%) saying they never experience stress as a result of the possibility of a mass shooting. Respondents for this survey were selected from among those who have agreed to participate in our surveys. The data have been weighted to reflect the composition of the adult population. Because the sample is based on those who agreed to participate in the online panel, no estimates of theoretical sampling error can be calculated.  “Mass shootings are a public health issue, and we need to take a comprehensive public health approach to understand and devise lasting policy solutions,” Evans said. “It is important that people and policymakers realize that this is not an insurmountable issue; it is something we have the power to change.”  last_img read more

Read More

Angel Fire Resort: Earliest Winter Season Deals

first_imgTEACHER SEASON PASS Courtesy/AFR Forecasters are predicting another wet winter, so mountain resort organizers are on the ready to offer some new deals for families and skiers.  ANGEL FIRE ― With last winter offering one of the best snow seasons in recent history, Angel Fire Resort is already preparing for this winter’s ski season. Courtesy/AFR “We understand many people might still be lounging by the pool or out on the golf course, but we just wanted get on everyone’s radar a little earlier this year,” explained, Greg Ralph, marketing director, Angel Fire Resort. “This is the earliest we’ve sold discounted ski passes, and by far these are the best value for those who plan to hit the slopes this winter.” The 2019-2020 Teacher Pass is a season pass for all teachers K-12 nationwide is now available at the heavily discounted price of just $99. The Teacher Pass is designed to thank educators for the work they do with students and to offer more value for teachers during the ski season. The game-changing Pass is a first of its kind in the industry as it is the first discounted season pass that has been offered exclusively for today’s educators. The Resort is offering the Teacher Pass online starting today in honor of school starting back up. The price will go up to $199 once the season begins.  Additionally, Angel Fire Resort will offer all active duty, retired, veterans, National Guard, & Reserve and their dependents discounted Military Season Passes for $299 if purchased before Oct. 31, 2019.  “When we introduced The Teacher Pass last year, we saw a huge interest from educators from all over, and we knew we needed to bring it back this year. With school starting soon we thought we’d offer the Pass earlier this year,” Ralph added.  Angel Fire Resort’s winter season is Dec. 14, 2019 – March 22, 2020.For more information and to purchase The Teacher Pass, Military Season Passes or Regular Season Passes  https://www.inntopia.travel/Ecomm/Shop/Merchandise/6547367/en-US/?productsupercategoryid=17 ANGEL FIRE SEASON PASSES center_img Making ski-industry history, the return of the first-ever Teacher Pass will offer all teachers K-12 one of the best full-season ski pass discounts in the country.  Courtesy/AFR “We have a very active military community. We are steps away from the National Veterans Wellness and Healing Center, and the only state park in the country with a dedicated memorial to Vietnam Veterans. We want to offer an affordable skiing destination for any veteran or active duty military members and their families,” Ralph stated.  Teachers will need to present their ID and a current pay stub from a school anywhere in the country to validate the Pass on their first day of use.  Courtesy/AFR Angel Fire Resort is also launching discounted season passes for children, juniors, and adults. The season passes include: unlimited skiing and snowboarding throughout the 2019-2020 season, with no blackout dates at Angel Fire Resort, night skiing when available, three free days of riding at Powder Alliance partner resorts, as well as, three free days at resort partners. Early season pricing is good through Oct. 31, 2019, and starts as low as $199 for children and $439 for adults.   AFR News: MILITARY SEASON PASS Courtesy/AFRlast_img read more

Read More

Henri Dauman: Behind The Lens

first_img Marshall McLuhan photographed by Henri Dauman in 1974. Elvis Presley. Independent/Henri DaumanHenri Dauman, whose iconic images of President and Mrs. Kennedy, Elvis Presley, Louis Armstrong, John Coltrane, Andy Warhol, and hundreds of others graced the pages of LIFE magazine for decades, recalled his first camera with a smile.“I bought it when I was still a child in France,” said Dauman, who lives in Hampton Bays with his wife, Odiana. “It was a twin-lens reflex Argoflex. I was shooting in the street, and I started to work with a couple of photographers — one was a fashion guy and the other was a photojournalist.”If that sounds as if Dauman led a charmed childhood, he did not. He is a Holocaust survivor. His father died in the Auschwitz prison camp, his mother died after mistakenly taking rat poison, which was sold to her as medicine from the black market, and this was after she and her son had twice escaped being imprisoned themselves. The 13-year-old Dauman ended up in an orphanage at the end of World War II.“I went to the cinema a lot. I was inspired by American movies,” he said. It’s a wonderful full circle that Nicole Suerez, Dauman’s granddaughter, started a ball rolling which eventually led to the documentary “Henri Dauman: Looking Up,” a film about Dauman’s life both behind and in front of the camera, which was screened at last fall’s Hamptons International Film Festival, and will be part of the Los Angeles Jewish Film Festival on May 5.But back to the young Dauman, spending his days in Paris in a darkened theater, watching Hollywood films.It was then that Uncle Sam beckoned. For real.The 17-year-old got a letter from his Uncle Sam, who lived in New York City. “He asked me if I wanted to come and live in the United States, and I said, ‘Sure.’ I had been dreaming of New York, seeing it in movies and photographs. It’s such a photogenic city. It’s like a big movie set.” He came on a ship, “and what struck me first was looking at the dockworkers picking up the rope to tie up the boat, and there was snow and ice everywhere, and realizing that New York City was not quite like I imagined it,” he said with a laugh.Bonding With His SubjectsThere’s no way to describe how familiar Dauman’s images are to so many, although he remains practically anonymous. His photos encapsulated generations on film; not only celebrities but life in America in the 1950s, ’60s, and beyond.But what was it like for a young, a really young, photographer to land a gig at LIFE Magazine at the apex of its popularity, the magazine which chronicled America, and be sent on assignments to capture some of the world’s most famous people? “That’s the thing, no matter how big their name is — whether it’s President Kennedy, Marilyn Monroe, Brigitte Bardot, anybody — they’re still human, they’re just like us. They just have talent,” he said.Because of this attitude, he was able to bond with many of his subjects. “When I first started to photograph seriously in New York, some of them were just people I wanted to meet, and it became my university,” he said. “I learned more from them than from going to any school.” Movie stars, politicians, artists, scientists, mathematicians, Dauman chronicled them all. Two of his most famous images couldn’t be more opposite — a sweat-soaked Miles Davis blowing his horn, and Jackie Kennedy, poised and elegant beneath a black veil at JFK’s funeral after her husband’s assassination.One of his favorite shoots was a surprise. “I went to Toronto to photograph a professor from the University of Toronto. He looked very much like you imagine a professor to be, like Jimmy Stewart,” Dauman said. “It was Marshall McLuhan,” philosopher at the front lines of media theory and the author of “The Medium is the Message.”“I stayed with him for 10 days in Toronto. Nobody had ever heard of him. And he told me about all this stuff that was coming — portable phones, small computers, something like the internet. He predicted all of this. This was early 1970s. I didn’t know what he was talking about!” But the images that Dauman captured during his stay spoke volumes to LIFE’s eager readers and helped propel McLuhan and his supposedly zany theories into the spotlight.Fondness For Film“Some of the most interesting stories are the most complicated stories. Like who would have thought that to do some story on a hidden professor at the University of Toronto? And yet he had the answer to our future,” he noted.Dauman also spent time with Elvis Presley, straight after his return from the U.S. Army. The two bonded. “Somehow we were able to relate. He was surrounded by all these people, but we were able to sit together at his kitchen table and we would talk about the early loss of our mothers. He was so devoted to her. Losing her was devastating to him,” Dauman recalled.Dauman returns to France May 8, to be present in Limay, where his mother hid with him during the war.“It’s a small town maybe 40 kilometers from Paris. I’m going back there to show the movie, and also, they are putting a plaque at the war memorial there in remembrance of my father. Last fall, 500 high school children across France were picked to visit Auschwitz, including 18 children from Limay. Five of them wrote an essay about my father — four of the children are Muslim — and they made it into a play,” which Dauman will get to see.As far as the lens being turned onto himself and his life, Dauman said, “I was reluctant to make the film, but it is these connections that make us human.”As far as photojournalism today: “It’s not what it used to be. A very high percentage of young people get their news from Facebook and places like that. This work is not research. When we did a story for LIFE, or The New York Times, it was well-researched. It used to be, on assignment, the writer and the photographer completed each other, so it’s not writing about the photograph or shooting about the text, but both having the best interest of the story at heart.”Many photographers bemoan the changeover to digital film, but Dauman simply shrugs it off.“Digital film really came in while journalism was dying. And film still has a roundness which is unmatched,” he said. “Millions of people are taking pictures with an iPhone. A hundred years from now, what will survive? Will you be showing your grandchildren a wedding album on a computer? Film survives. It lasts. It’s what will still be here.” To learn more, visit www.daumanpictures.com.bridget@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

Read More

Milwaukee’s award after tonnage leap

first_imgLast year Milwaukee moved more than 318,000 metric tonnes of cargo through the St. Lawrence Seaway – a 22 percent increase compared with 2008.Eric Reinelt, port director, is due to accept the award on behalf of the port and the city.He said: “Milwaukee has always looked to the Seaway as a vital marine trade route for moving manufactured and agricultural goods to market and receiving essential imports.”That was especially true in 2009 as we saw an increase in grain exports and handled an 800,000 pound transformer – the biggest piece of project cargo we’ve moved in recent years.”last_img read more

Read More

World’s largest containership enters service

first_imgThe 16,000 teu ship which was built at the Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering (DSME) yard in South Korea, has impressive dimensions: 396 m long, 54 m wide, and a draft of 16 m.She is the first of a series of three 16,000 teu ships that will all be named after great explorers, with the other two vessels expected in 2013.All three will operate on the Group’s French Asia Line (FAL 1) which offers a fixed-day, weekly connection between Central and South China, and Northern Europe.www.cma-cgm.comlast_img read more

Read More

Madrid – Valladolid progress

first_imgTHE LAST stage of the planning process for the Madrid – Segovia high speed line was completed on May 19. The government published its formal approval of the final alignment, enabling civil works to begin on the first 76 km of the route from the capital to Valladolid and Medina del Campo. The Madrid – Segovia section is expected to cost Pts270bn to build.Starting at Madrid Chamartín, the new line will run alongside the existing route to Burgos as far as Tres Cantos, then enter a 9 km tunnel before the twin 28 km bores taking the route under the Guadarrama mountains (RG 1.01 p58). The final section runs to the east of Segovia, which will be served by a new station located 2 km from the city centre.High speed construction authority GIF has awarded three contracts for civil works north of Segovia, with Construcciones Slast_img read more

Read More

Luxury unit ready to go

first_imgNEXT month French Railcruise plans to run its first luxury tour of southwest France using a heavily-refurbished X4500 two-car diesel multiple-unit. The original interior of the SNCF unit has been completely replaced, with luxurious fittings designed by MBD Design to give the train’s 22 passengers ’exceptional conditions of comfort, elegance and safety.’Individual ivory-coloured leather armchairs from Compin are arranged in pairs in the lounge, with wide, retractable wooden tables between them. Each seat has an electrical socket and a shelving unit, and is angled to give views out of the windows. The bar and smoking car uses warm colours and ’sophisticated details’ to give a ’cosy atmosphere’. There are seats for 12 people on leather sofas and stools, and the bar staff offer a range of champagne, cognac, cigars and regional food. Interior fittings were supplied by James Enterprises. The train is equipped with a sound system for commentaries or music, and the lounge has two 42 in plasma screens linked to DVD players. The train is fully air-conditioned, and has separate ladies and gents toilets. Top speed is 120 km/h. Overnight accommodation will be provided in local hotels along the route. As well as regular four-day trips between Bordeaux and Toulouse the train is available for private charter.H Next month PeruRail will introduce a luxury dining service on the 914mm gauge Cuzco – Machupicchu route, using four carriages purchased from Singapore and refurbished at PeruRail’s workshops to designs by James Park Associates.last_img read more

Read More