Will Anika Noni Rose & Sophie Okonedo Join Denzel Washington in A Raisin in the Sun on Broadway?

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on June 15, 2014 Related Shows Denzel Washington A Raisin in the Sun Lorraine Hansbury’s A Raisin in the Sun tells the story of three generations of a family living and struggling together under one roof. The Youngers—Mama, her children Beneatha and Walter Lee, and his wife Ruth and their son Travis—live on Chicago’s South Side in the 1950s. It is a place in which dreams, like the raisin in the Langston Hughes’ poem from which the play takes its title, wither and die if nothing is done with them. Are Tony winner Anika Noni Rose and Oscar nominee Sophie Okonedo moving into the Younger household? According to Showbiz411.com, the actresses may join Tony and Oscar winner Denzel Washington in the previously rumored Broadway revival of A Raisin in the Sun. Kenny Leon, who directed Washington in Fences, will helm the new production, produced by Scott Rudin. Washington is eyeing the role of Walter Younger in the classic drama. Star Files Rose recently appeared in the Encores! staging of The Cradle Will Rock. She won a 2004 Tony Award for her performance in Caroline, or Change, having previously appeared in Footloose. Rose followed up her Tony win with a starring role in the 2008 revival of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. Her film credits include The Princess and the Frog, For Colored Girls and Dreamgirls. Okonedo received a 2004 Oscar nomination for her performance in Hotel Rwanda. Her other film credits include Aeon Flux, Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls, Dirty Pretty Things and The Secret Life of Bees. A Raisin in the Sun first premiered on Broadway on March 11, 1959 at the Barrymore Theatre. The play earned four Tony Award nominations including Best Play as well as acting nods for stars Sidney Poitier and Claudia McNeil. The 2004 revival won Tonys for Phylicia Rashad and Audra McDonald. The production starred Sean Combs as Walter in his Broadway debut. Sophie Okonedo View Commentslast_img read more

Read More

GMP issues RFP for Stafford Hill Solar Farm in Rutland

first_imgGreen Mountain Power Corp,Green Mountain Power today issued a request for proposals from companies interested in providing detailed engineering and design services for the Stafford Hill Solar Farm, which GMP hopes will be the largest solar farm in Vermont upon completion. The project, to be built on Rutlands former landfill behind the Stafford Technical Center, is part of Green Mountain Powers effort to make Rutland the solar capital of New England. The project will also contribute to the larger statewide goal of producing 90 percent of our electricity from renewable sources by 2050, said GMP President and CEO Mary Powell.  Were looking for a designer who can help us maximize production at the site as affordably as possible. Earlier this fall, GMP agreed with the city on a 25-year lease on the former landfill, which is renewable for an additional 25 years. We see this as a win-win-win, said Steve Costello, GMPs vice president for generation and energy innovation.  It creates a productive use of long-fallow land, provides an income to the city, and generates clean, renewable energy for our customers in line with state energy policy and goals. GMP is seeking an experienced firm with a background in designing and engineering solar projects, specifically on landfill and brownfield sites.  The design and engineering work will include photovoltaic arrays, site improvements, electrical work in conformance with the National Electrical Code, coordination with GMP staff and consultants, and verification of all dimensions and conditions at the site.  The site is adjacent to the existing Rutland County Solid Waste District drop-off facility, which will remain in place. Bids are due by 5 p.m. on Jan. 11, 2013. The RFP issued today comes just days before GMP will commission the Creek Path Solar Farm, a 150-kilowatt solar site adjacent to East Creek and Cleveland Avenue. That project, which is expected to come on-line Monday, was also built on a brownfield site that housed an old coal-to-gas plant back in 1901 and sat largely empty for several decades after the 1950s. While we continue to examine a host of sites and encourage others to do so as well, we are focusing our initial development efforts on brownfields, Powell said.  Site selection is a critical part of good solar development, and we believe the Creek Path and Stafford Hill locations are perfect initial sites given the lack of alternative uses and the benefits they will produce. The projects are part of GMPs plan to create and inspire construction of enough solar to provide Rutland with the highest installed solar per capita of any city in the northeast.  This solar development is another foundation stone that we hope will stimulate others to join us to create new economic opportunity for Rutland and Vermont, Powell said. Added Costello: We expect several announcements in the coming months about other projects, some independent of GMP and some involving us directly, which will contribute to our goals in Rutland. In addition to the solar capital effort, GMP is building a new Energy Innovation Center in the former Eastmans Building, where the company expects to develop new generation and pilot new customer programs, efficiency ideas and educational opportunities for students and customers statewide. GMP is also recruiting new business such as Small Dog Electronics to locate in Rutland.  Vermont Energy Investment Corp. and Neighborworks of Western Vermont announced plans to co-locate some staff at the EIC last week. About Green Mountain PowerGreen Mountain Power (www.greenmountainpower.com(link is external)) transmits, distributes and sells electricity in the state of Vermont. The company, which serves more than 250,000 customers, has set its vision to be the best small utility in America.last_img read more

Read More

DFR files emergency rules on fully-insured Association Health Plans

first_imgVermont Business Magazine The Department of Financial Regulation (DFR) today filed emergency regulations and proposed final rules in response to the United States Department of Labor’s (DOL) June 19 final rule on Association Health Plans (AHPs). The emergency rule is effective immediately. Both rules filed today govern only fully-insured AHPs (i.e. AHPs that purchase coverage from an insurer and do not self-insure).The DOL rule greatly expands the ability of small businesses and self-employed workers to band together by geography or industry to provide health care coverage to their members as if they were a single large employer. The department engaged in emergency rulemaking to ensure new Vermont regulations are in place in advance of September 1, 2018 when fully-insured AHPs can be offered in Vermont. The simultaneously filed proposed final rules will provide an opportunity for full public participation and comment, including a public hearing.The emergency rules ensure the department meets the directive in Act 131 for the commissioner to adopt rules to “protect Vermont consumers and promote the stability of Vermont’s health insurance markets, to the extent permitted under federal law.”Michael Pieciak, DFR commissioner, emphasized the rules’ consumer-protection purpose: “Our team has put together a set of rules that, while allowing legitimate AHPs offering good coverage to operate, will ensure that Vermonters are protected from misleading practices and inadequate health coverage.”In early July Pieciak said in anticipation of Vermont filing emergency rules: “The final AHP rules do not preempt Vermont’s ability to regulate its insurance market and the department aims to craft regulations that ensure Vermonters are protected and well-served by these health plans,” he said. “In the past, similar plans that operated in other states, were poorly run and many were fraudulent, a well-regulated market will help prevent this from happening in Vermont.”The emergency regulations and proposed final rules(link is external) are published on the department’s website.The department also plans to promulgate rules governing self-insured AHPs in the fall of this year; self-insured AHPs cannot offer coverage in Vermont until January 1, 2019.Source: Vermont Department of Financial Regulationlast_img read more

Read More

Grace Cottage wins three ‘Readers Choice’ awards

first_imgGrace Cottage Hospital,Vermont Business Magazine “Best Place to Work”, “Best Physical Therapy”, and “Best Doctor” were the three categories for which Townshend’s Grace Cottage Family Health & Hospital took home top honors in the 2018 Brattleboro Reformer Readers Choice Awards. All winners were recognized in the July 21stedition of the Windham County publication. This is the second consecutive year that Grace Cottage received the “Best Place to Work” and “Best Physical Therapy” awards. The “Best Doctor” award this year was shared in a three-way tie between Grace Cottage primary care physician Dr. Maurice Geurts, and Dr. Denise Paasche and Dr. Tom Evans of Brattleboro.Director of Rehabilitation Services Crystal Mansfield said the physical therapy award was well-deserved by her staff and that if there was an award for occupational therapy, she’s confident her team would have won that, too.Grace Cottage CEO Doug DiVello attributes the “Best Place to Work” award to a number of factors – the most important of which is the existence of a collegial environment where all staff are valued and respected.Grace Cottage Family Health & Hospital is located in Townshend, VT. In May, the healthcare facility was recognized for a second consecutive year as a Top 20 Critical Access Hospital for Patient Satisfaction by the National Rural Health Association.Source: TOWNSHEND—Grace Cottagelast_img read more

Read More

Carina White named SM North Homecoming Queen

first_imgThe SM North queen candidates included: (L-R) Darby Huddleston, Darian Dozier, Kaytlyn Tieman, Meghan Love, Jessica Cannon, Neyda Venzor, Sarah Grandgenett, Ara Metz, Jocelyn Flores , and Carina White2013 SM North Homecoming Queen Carina White (center) with first attendant Darby Huddleston (left) and second attendant Jocelyn Flores.Carina White was crowned Homecoming Queen at SM North Friday night during halftime of the SM North football game.Named first attendant was Darby Huddleston and second attendant was Jocelyn Flores. In addition, the queen’s court included: Darian Dozier, Kaytlyn Tieman, Meghan Love, Jessica Cannon, Neyda Venzor, Sarah Grandgenett, and Ara Metz.The weekend concluded with the homecoming dance Saturday night at the school.last_img read more

Read More

Attending the Bar Convention? There’s an app for that

first_imgAttending the Bar Convention? There’s an app for that April 30, 2013 Regular News Attending the Bar Convention? There’s an app for that Attending the Bar’s Annual Convention in Boca Raton? Then you need to download the new Florida Bar convention app to serve as your mobile guide to the whole conference. “This app gives you all the information you need for the convention right on your smart phone,” said Michelle Suskauer, the convention’s chair.Looking for a specific meeting or seminar? Want to see who’s speaking when? What time does the luncheon start? All that information and much more can be accessed right on your iPhone, Android, or iPad.The convention is set for June 26-29 at the Boca Raton Resort & Club. “Inclusion: The Path to Unity” is this year’s theme.Suskauer said the app provides user links to the schedules, seminars, exhibitors, sponsors, maps of the facility, and bios of speakers. It can also be used to map out your own schedule and is linked to the Bar’s Facebook page and Twitter feed to keep attendees up to date on the latest convention happenings.“It is very user-friendly so that you can take advantage of everything the convention has to offer,” Suskauer said.“It also helps our convention sponsors and exhibitors, because you can click and find their location and what they are offering.”Suskauer said the app can be customized to provide the user with as little or as much information as they want and eliminates the need to carry around a lot of bulky materials.“And you don’t have to be tech savvy to understand it,” she said.Suskauer said the development of the convention app is another step in the Bar’s effort to better communicate with its members, especially the Bar’s younger lawyers.“Increasingly, this is how many lawyers want their information, and we are accommodating them,” Suskauer said.You can download the app — and learn much more about what the convention has to offer — by visiting the Bar’s website at www.floridabar.org.last_img read more

Read More

Minnesota has first road test tonight in Cedar Falls

first_imgMinnesota has first road test tonight in Cedar Falls Mark HeiseNovember 13, 2007Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintIf Northern Iowa’s convincing 72-58 win over Colorado State is any indication of how the Panthers’ season will go, the low-scoring Minnesota women’s basketball team might be in trouble tonight.But it shouldn’t be an indicator, as Colorado State is more of another Australian national team than an Ohio State powerhouse.So when Minnesota (1-0 overall, 0-0 Big Ten) tips off at 7 p.m. tonight against Northern Iowa (1-0, 0-0 Missouri Valley) to begin the team’s first away game of the season, the Gophers should be favored.But coach Pam Borton said the team wasn’t taking anything for granted.“We’re not taking anybody lightly,” she said. “We’re not in a position to do that yet. This is just our first road game, so we’ll find out what we’re all about here.”Rebounding was a big part of Minnesota’s success against UC-Riverside last weekend, and it should be a factor again, as the Panthers have just one player taller than 6 feet 1 inch, and barely out-rebounded Colorado State in their last matchup.“This will be a good test for us,” sophomore forward Ashley Ellis-Milan said. “Rebounding and defense are the two key factors for us, and I’m pretty confident that we’ll be able to overcome whatever Northern Iowa throws at us.”Minnesota might be a defensive-minded team, but it will have to find ways to put up more points, as the Gophers only scored 57 in their season opener. “We’re getting good shots, our players are doing a good job of crashing the boards and getting second chances. Now we just need to finish,” sophomore guard Brittany McCoy said. “We work so hard sometimes to get a good shot or an offensive board, and then we just throw those opportunities away. That’s something we’ve been focusing on getting away from.”Northern Iowa is starting three freshmen in a young lineup, but is led by sophomore guard Danielle Wubbens, who scored a team-high 14 points in the season opener.Senior forward Megan Keefe averaged 9.2 points per game last year and is the only returning player to average more than four points per game at the college level over a full season.“We talked about going out hungry because Northern Iowa does have freshmen starting, and we know how it was last year, playing against more experienced teams,” McCoy said. “So we’re going to go in there knowing that this is a game we can and should win, and we’re going to take care of business.”Minnesota, meanwhile, has 81 percent of its scoring back for this season, and if the defense creates the turnovers it has so far this year, the Gophers have the ability to put up a lot of points in a hurry, as they did against Riverside, transitioning quickly from defense to offense for easy baskets.But Borton said the main goal was to work on improving the team, listing everything from half-court offensive sets to defensive breakdown, to rebounding as things that needed improvement in the coming months.“Everything that involves the game of basketball, we’re working on,” she said. “We’re still working on fundamentals and breaking down different things so we can become better at it. I don’t think we’re great at anything right now.”last_img read more

Read More

E coli outbreak strain found in hazelnut sample

first_img Mar 8 Capital Press story Shaun George, a representative of George Packing Co., based in Newberg, Ore., told the Capital Press the company declined to share the grower names with the FDA, because the information is proprietary and the hazelnuts had not been definitively linked to the E coli illnesses. Mar 7 CIDRAP News story “Suspected pathogens spark peanut butter, hazelnut recalls” George said he believed the FDA would investigate practices at the farms, where nuts are harvested off the ground. On Mar 4, DeFranco and Sons, based in Los Angeles, recalled its bulk and consumer-pack in-shell hazelnut products after illness investigations in Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin linked them to seven E coli O157:H7 infections. The company said it received the in-shell nuts from suppliers and growers and distributed them nationwide and to Canada. In other developments, a hazelnut packer that distributed some of the products is refusing share the names of farm sources with US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) investigators, the Capital Press, a grower industry Web site, reported yesterday. In the Mar 4 FDA recall notice, George Packing was listed as one of the brands distributed by DeFranco and Sons. Other nuts are harvested off the ground as well, but in 2007, the US Department of Agriculture said California almonds had to comply with new pasteurization regulations established in response to Salmonella outbreaks linked to almonds. The rule was developed by the Almond Board of California, an industry group. California is the world’s largest almond producer. Joshua Rounds, MPH, an epidemiologist with the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH), said the in-shell hazelnuts were collected for testing by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture. The findings are the first product test to suggest that the hazelnuts were contaminated. Earlier epidemiologic investigations in Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin had already found that the seven patients sickened in the outbreak had consumed in-shell hazelnuts.center_img Mar 9, 2011 (CIDRAP News) – Lab tests have shown that Escherichia coli O157:H7 coli found in hazelnuts from the home of one of three Minnesotans sickened in a three-state E coli outbreak matches the outbreak strain, Minnesota officials said today. So far, the hazelnuts from one of Minnesota’s three patients appear to be the only ones available for testing. Spokeswomen from the Michigan and Wisconsin health departments told CIDRAP News that none of their patients had nuts left for testing. They also said no new illnesses in the two states have been associated with the outbreak. See also: The United States is the world’s third largest hazelnut producer, behind Turkey and Italy. About 99% of the nation’s hazelnut crop is grown in Oregon’s Willamette Valley, according to an Iowa State University industry profile. In 2008 US growers sold 22,400 tons of in-shell hazelnuts. Iowa State University background information on the hazelnut industry Apr 6, 2007, FoodNaviagator-usa.com storylast_img read more

Read More

US debuts life sciences dual-use research policy

first_imgMar 29, 2012 (CIDRAP News) – Federal health officials today unveiled a new policy for overseeing life sciences dual-use research, such as two recent H5N1 transmission studies that have sparked bioterror concerns as well as cries of censorship.The launch of the new policy, first reported by ScienceInsider, comes while a US biosecurity advisory group is meeting to discuss the latest version of two H5N1 transmission papers, one by a group from Erasmus University in the Netherlands and one by a team from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.The move also follows a demand from a US congressman that President Obama’s science office explain why the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity (NSABB) didn’t consider the dual-use implications until after the studies were completed and what safeguards are in place to protect Americans against biological attacks. The congressman, Rep Jim Sensenbrenner, R-Wisc., asked John Holdren, who leads the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, to report back by Mar 31.The NSABB is meeting today and tomorrow to weigh further data presented by the two research groups on their studies.The 4-page policy, which came from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of Biotechnology Activities, requires federal agencies to routinely review potential risks of federally funded studies that involve 15 “high consequence” pathogens and toxins, including H5N1 avian flu, Bacillus anthracis, and Ebola virus.According to the NIH’s Web site, “The fundamental aim of this oversight is to preserve the benefits of life sciences research while minimizing the risk of misuse of the knowledge, information, products, or technologies provided by such research.”The policy expands reviews that the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the government’s two largest biomedical agencies, already conduct on staff-run studies and extends oversight to federally funded studies at universities and other facilities. The new requirements also apply to other federal agencies that conduct unclassified life sciences research, such as the Department of Defense.It applies to research studies that are on the horizon and ones that have already been funded. Reviews that find dual-use potential require the funding agencies and scientists to develop a risk mitigation plan.According to the new policy, if the risks can’t be mitigated with several suggested measures, federal agencies are required to determine whether to request voluntary redaction of the resulting research publications or communications, to classify the research, or to withhold or terminate funding for the study.Actions to restrict publication may have implications for export control laws and regulations, the new policy states. Earlier this month, the Dutch government said it was considering using export controls to prevent full publication by the Erasmus group.Within 60 days federal agencies are required to report to the White House the number of proposed or ongoing studies related to the 15 high-consequence agents, and in 90 days to report how many have dual-use potential.The NIH has already completed its own dual-use biosecurity assessment and found fewer than 10 studies that warrant further risk management, the Washington Post reported today.See also:Mar 29 ScienceInsider storyUS government dual-use oversight policyNIH Web site on dual useMar 12 CIDRAP News story “Dutch export rules could block publication of Fouchier H5N1 study”Mar 5 CIDRAP News story “Details of H5N1 study sparks queries from congressman, experts”last_img read more

Read More

Study hints flu shot effects may last more than one season

first_imgA new study found that influenza vaccine yielded moderate overall protection during the 2012-13 flu season, an unsurprising result. But it also offered a couple of surprises, including that patients who missed the current vaccine but had received the previous year’s version still seemed to have some protection against the virus.The study, published this week in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, also suggested that the flu vaccine was not significantly protective against influenza A/H3N2 in children ages 9 through 17, a finding that puzzled the authors.The investigators also found that the trivalent (three-strain) vaccine for 2012-13 provided moderate protection against both lineages of influenza B, not just the Yamagata lineage included in the vaccine—unlike some previous studies.”Cross-lineage protection and residual effects from prior vaccination were observed and warrant further investigation,” the report observes tersely.Test-negative design usedThe study was conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) US Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness (VE) Network, which includes five centers around the country, in Marshfield, Wis.; Ann Arbor and Detroit; Temple-Belton, Tex.; Seattle; and Pittsburgh.The authors used a test-negative case-control study design, wherein patients with an acute respiratory illness during flu season are tested for flu and their vaccination status is determined. Those who test positive are classified as cases and those who test negative as controls.The team enrolled 6,766 patients in the study, of whom 6,452 were included in the analysis. Of those, 36% tested positive for flu. Among cases in which the flu type could be determined, 1,292 were H3N2, 52 were 2009 H1N1, 582 were influenza B/Yamagata (the vaccine strain), and 303 were B/Victoria.Current-season flu vaccination was documented in 45% (2,877) of the patients. Of these, 83% received inactivated flu vaccine (IIV), 8% received the live attenuated (nasal spray) vaccine (LAIV), less than 1% received other vaccine types, and 8% had an unknown vaccine type. Current and prior-year vaccination were highly correlated.Overall effectiveness 49%With those numbers, the authors calculated the overall VE, adjusted for various confounders, at 49% (95% confidence interval [CI], 43%-55%). By virus subtype, VE was 39% against H3N2 (95% CI, 29%-47%), 66% against B/Yamagata (95% CI, 58%-73%), and 51% against B/Victoria (95% CI, 36%-63%). VE against H1N1 was not assessed because there were too few cases to give meaningful results.In an age-group analysis, the researchers found that the vaccine provided significant protection against any flu strain in all groups except those 65 and older. For H3N2, VE was low not only in the elderly (11%; 95% CI, –41%-43%) but also in children ages 9 through 17 (24%; 95% CI, –12%-49%).In other findings, the effectiveness of IIV and LAIV did not differ significantly in children aged 2 through 17 years, the report says. For H3N2, IIV had 36% effectiveness (95% CI, 15%-51%), compared with 46% for LAIV (95% CI, 13%-66%). For B/Yamagata, the numbers were 68% (54%-77%) for IIV and 53% (20%-73%) for LAIV.Effect of prior-year vaccinationTo assess the effects of previous-year vaccination, the researchers defined four vaccine-exposure groups: those vaccinated in both the current and prior seasons, vaccinated in the current season only, vaccinated in the prior season only, and not vaccinated in either season. They limited the analysis to patients at least 9 years old. Also, they note that the H3N2 and B components of the vaccine were changed for the 2012-13 season.The investigators found that, when compared with those who received neither year’s vaccine, the first three groups all had similar protection against H3N2. The adjusted VE numbers were 35% (CI, 21%-47%) for those vaccinated both years, 37% (CI, 19%-51%) for current-season-only vaccinees, and 33% (12%-49%) for prior-season-only vaccinees. The results varied somewhat by age-group.In the same analysis for type B, the researchers found that VE was higher than for H3N2 and similar for all combinations of current and prior-season vaccination and all age-groups. For example, VE against B/Yamagata was 62% for both-season vaccination, 69% for current-season only, and 50% for prior season only.”Overall, we found minimal differences in effectiveness against A/H3N2 and B for each of the three current and prior season vaccination exposure groups, suggesting some residual effect of prior vaccination on current season VE,” the authors wrote.More than expected residual protection”The point is that there’s more residual protection than we thought,” said coauthor Arnold Monto, MD, a professor of epidemiology and public health at the University of Michigan, in an interview. But he cautioned, “I think the whole issue of prior-year vaccination is one we don’t fully understand.”Monto said his group has been analyzing some of its findings from comparative clinical trials of IIV and LAIV from 2004 to 2008 and has found that with IIV, the waning of antibodies after vaccination was less than previously thought. “Therefore the concept that it’s very important to get vaccinated late in the vaccination season,” to shorten the time between vaccination and potential flu exposure, “may have been relatively overstated.”The current findings contrast with those of a study published last year by Monto and colleagues in Clinical Infectious Diseases. They recruited 328 households and monitored them during the 2010-11 flu season. The results showed that flu risk was almost the same in vaccinated and unvaccinated participants. But when the researchers looked separately at participants who had been vaccinated in the 2010-11 season but not in the previous season, they found a VE of 62%, whereas those who were vaccinated in both years had no significant protection.Monto said his group’s household studies generally suggest that those who were vaccinated in the current season but not the previous season had more protection than those who were vaccinated in both seasons. “But the differences are not that great,” as the confidence intervals for the estimates tend to be wide and overlapping, he added.In the new paper, the authors observe, “The immunologic effects of repeated vaccination are not well understood, and additional studies are needed to understand the impact of past infections, past vaccinations, and antigenic variability on risk of illness.”In other comments, the authors said the low VE against H3N2 in 9- to 17-year-old children was unexpected, since vaccine performance in that age-group was similar to that in other groups in the previous season. Further work, they said, is needed to identify factors that might contribute to lower protection in older children.Monto suggested that the finding of low VE for H3N2 in older kids may not mean much. “If you cut things too much in terms of the age-groups, you’ll find results that can’t be replicated in other years,” he said in the interview. “There’s some degree of random variation, because we’ve always found that age-group pretty responsive” to the vaccine.As for the finding of significant protection against both type B lineages, the authors wrote that cross-lineage protection was also found in Canada in 2012-13 and in the United States in 2011-12, but Canadian data for 2011-12 showed little or no cross-lineage protection.The authors said their current finding of cross-lineage effectiveness, along with the similar previous evidence, suggests that quadrivalent (four-strain) flu vaccines “may provide little or no additional protection compared to trivalent vaccines,” which target just one type B lineage.They added that further research is needed to assess whether quadrivalent vaccines yield greater benefits in children, who have had fewer natural influenza B infections than older groups have.McLean HQ, Thompson MG,. Sundaram ME, et al. Influenza vaccine effectiveness in the United States during 2012-13: variable protection by age and virus type. J infect Dis 2014 (Early online publication Nov 18) [Full text]See also: Mar 1, 2013, CIDRAP News story on earlier Michigan study examining effect of prior-year vaccinationlast_img read more

Read More