Mascoma Savings Bank’s CEO announces 2017 retirement plans

first_imgMascoma Savings Bank, FSB,Vermont Business Magazine Stephen F Christy, President and CEO of Mascoma Savings Bank, has announced his plans to retire on January 1, 2017 after almost 27 years at the helm of the local institution he first joined as a teller in 1973. Headquartered in Lebanon, New Hampshire, Mascoma Savings Bank is a $1.4 billion mutually owned bank established in 1899 with 27 branch locations in western New Hampshire and eastern Vermont, and two loan production offices in Vermont. Christy has held the top post at Mascoma Savings Bank since February of 1990. He also serves on the executive committee and the board of directors, which will embark on a search for his successor with the assistance of Kaplan Partners of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.“In making my plans for retirement, I’m comfortable in knowing that the commitment Mascoma Savings Bank has made to its customers and to the communities it serves will not change,” Christy said. “These values are ingrained not only in our culture, but also in our basic foundation as a mutual bank. We’re here for our customers. It’s as simple as that, and I have every confidence that it will always remain that way.”“Mascoma Savings Bank has experienced unprecedented growth and prosperity under Steve Christy’s leadership,” said Gretchen E. Cherington, Chair of the Board of Directors. “His dedication to our customers, his involvement in our communities, his genuine compassion for our employees, and his work on behalf of our industry are truly exemplary.“The board and I are extremely proud of Steve’s accomplishments and his years of service to the Bank,” she added. “His name has become synonymous with Mascoma Savings Bank; it will be a challenge to replace him, but we are confident that his legacy will continue.”Christy’s unwavering commitment to the community banking industry was recognized in 2014 with his selection as the Community Banker of the Year by the New Hampshire Bankers Association. The prestigious award honors individuals who go beyond the course of ordinary business to help improve the state through their civic and community engagement.Born and raised in the South, Christy is a graduate of Northwestern State University in Louisiana, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in history. During his high school and college summers, he worked in New Hampshire on the Mt. Washington Cog Railway. Following his graduation from Northwestern State University, he moved permanently to the Granite State, joining Mascoma Savings Bank more than four decades ago.Christy has held membership and leadership positions with numerous organizations in the community over the years. He is a past trustee of Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital, the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Clinic, and Alice Peck Day Memorial Hospital. He also chaired the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Alliance.  He is a past president and secretary of the Rotary Club of Lebanon. He is a past president of the Lebanon Public Library Foundation. He has also served as a director and chairman of Vital Communities in White River Junction, VT. In addition, he was a trustee and treasurer of the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, VT; a director of the New Hampshire Aviation Historical Society; and is a former member of the Airport Advisory Committee for the City of Lebanon, NH.  Professionally he is a past director of the Vermont Bankers Association and a past director and chairman of the New Hampshire Bankers Association. He is also a former director of the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston, where he chaired the audit committee.  He is a former director of the American Bankers Association in Washington, D.C.;Currently Christy is a director of the Daniel Webster Council of Boy Scouts of America in Manchester, NH; the New Hampshire Humanities Council, and the American Precision Museum in Windsor, VT. A private pilot, he makes his home in Lebanon, NH and plans to remain in the area, and active in the community, following his retirement.LEBANON, NEW HAMPSHIRE, (January 7, 2016)last_img read more

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Food on Friday: Tomat-No!

first_imgLooks promising, doesn’t it? It will be devoured by a squirrel in the next day, guaranteed.By Julia WesthoffWhat’s growing in your garden? I can tell you what is not growing in ours: tomatoes. Our squirrel neighbors are getting every single one of them, despite our best efforts. We’ve protected the plants with netting and had our dog prowl the grounds and still, every time I look out the window I see a little rodent running off with another heirloom tomato. We have six plants, and Jay doubts we will have any kind of harvest. It is crushing my soul.So, friends, any tips? In the meantime, here are some favorite tomato recipes from years past. These are all staples in our house, and I know they will be in yours, too. Now excuse me while I go weep quietly.Checca SauceCheesy Tomato SoupPico de GalloSalsaTomato CandyTomato Mozzarella Bread Saladlast_img read more

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RPPTL fellowships aim to attract young lawyers

first_imgRPPTL fellowships aim to attract young lawyers The Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section is now accepting applications to its fellowship program aimed at recruiting young practitioners to the Bar’s largest and oldest section.The fellowship program — created in 2007 and modeled after the successful fellowship program of the ABA — allows individuals to be substantially involved in the section’s work, receive leadership training, and work closely with leading attorneys in their field.In its inaugural year, the program received more than 80 applicants for four positions.The fellowship program is open to all lawyers who are members of the RPPTL Section and have been admitted to the Bar for fewer than 12 years or are younger than 38 years of age. Applicants should be able to demonstrate that a substantial portion of their practice is focused in the area of real property, probate, or trust law.Fellowships are provided for a two-year term. The RPPTL Section has more than 50 active committees and an Executive Council with more than 225 active members. The Executive Council and the section committees meet on a quarterly basis, beginning in June each year, at locations throughout the state. The quarterly meetings usually run from Thursday through Saturday and include substantive work and social events for networking.Each fellow will receive a subsidy of up to $2,500 annually (not to exceed actual out-of-pocket expenses) to help defray the expense of attending RPPTL Section meetings. Each fellow will also be assigned a social mentor who is a member of the Executive Council to assist the fellow in maximizing his or her experience.In addition, each fellow will be assigned a committee mentor to assist the fellow’s active involvement in the committee that most closely fits the fellow’s practice area with the goal of maximizing his or her professional development through the program.In return for the RPPTL Section commitments, a fellow is required to attend a minimum of three Executive Council meetings per year, serve as an active member of either the Membership Development Committee or the Membership Diversity Committee, and be an active member of at least one substantive committee. As an active committee member, the fellow will be required to complete one substantive work project on behalf of the committee on an annual basis. This project may include writing an article in his or her area of expertise for the section’s publication, Action Line, chairing a subcommittee, or drafting proposed legislation on behalf of the committee. To assure these requirements are fulfilled, each fellow must submit a work plan to the Fellowship Committee by October of each year, which outlines the substantive work project they have chosen, and a report at the end of each year.The fellows’ application is available through the RPPTL Section Web site at www.rpptl.org. All applications should be submitted to RPPTLfellowship@gmail.org or by mail to RPPTL Fellowship Program, Attn: Elizabeth Smith, The Florida Bar, 651 E. Jefferson Street, Tallahassee 32399-2300.The deadline to apply is April 1.The co-chair of the committee is Tae Bronner. She is available for additional information and m ay be reached at tae@estatelaw.com or (813) 907-6643. RPPTL fellowships aim to attract young lawyers January 15, 2010 Regular News Winners will be provided leadership training and mentorslast_img read more

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Three national champs and a top-10 finish for women in Texas

first_imgShe would go on to be honored as the College Swimming Coaches Association of America (CSCAA) Diver of the Championships for her performances.Junior Kaylee Jamison bettered her school record in the 100-yard butterfly with a time of 52.69 and was an All-America honorable mention, as were the 200-yard medley, and 800-yard freestyle relays.Through two days, Minnesota had two national champions. Why would it slow down Saturday?Sophomore Spencer won the title in the 200-yard breaststroke with a time 2:06.12.âÄúI didnâÄôt know IâÄôd won,âÄù Spencer said. âÄúIn that last 10 yards, I did what I always do. I stuck my head down to go for it.âÄùSpencer was in fourth place entering the final 25 yards, but rallied with a 32.30 second split to win by a mere six one-hundredths of a second.âÄúHaley always has a great back half of the race,âÄù co-head coach Kelly Kremer said. âÄúThis isnâÄôt a surprise. Haley has worked really hard all year. What a great way to end the meet.âÄùTyler finished fourth after recording the fastest time in the prelims.Steenvoorden improved upon her school record in the 1650-yard freestyle with a 15:53.80 and a fourth place finish.âÄúThe Gophers brought a squad here that was prepared and ready to compete,âÄù co-head coach Terry Nieszner said. âÄúThis group made a statement about Minnesota swimming and diving.âÄù Three national champs and a top-10 finish for women in TexasKelci Bryant, Jillian Tyler and Haley Spencer led an experienced group of Gophers at the NCAA championships. Samuel GordonMarch 21, 2011Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintThe Minnesota womenâÄôs swimming and diving team traveled to Texas on Tuesday for the NCAA national championships, and returned with three national champions and 13 All-Americans.Kelci Bryant, Jillian Tyler and Haley Spencer led an experienced group of Gophers to a ninth-place finish. MinnesotaâÄôs 192 team points were a school record, while the University of California won the team championship, its second in the past three years.Bryant got things started on Thursday with a victory in the 1-meter dive. The junior was runner-up in last yearâÄôs event, but would not be denied this year. Bryant grabbed the lead following the first dive and never relinquished it, as she led after each of the six dives.âÄúI was thinking through my dive,âÄù Bryant said of her final dive. âÄúI was kind of zoning out. I wasnâÄôt stressing too much. I was having fun. I think I kind of had it in my head that I had [the win] in the bag already. I tried not to focus on what bad could happen.âÄùAshley Steenvoorden made a little history of her own that night. The All-American set a school record in the 500-yard freestyle prelims with a time of 4:36.48. She went on to swim a 4:37.11 in the finals, good enough for fourth place and All-America honors.Minnesota finished out ThursdayâÄôs portion of the championships with a sixth-place finish and All-America honors in the 400-yard medley relay.Tyler highlighted Friday for the Gophers. The senior clocked a 58.39 in the 100-yard breaststroke to claim her first national title.âÄúIâÄôm so thankful for the experience. This means the world to me,âÄù Tyler said. âÄúI just put my head down and swam to the finish. You just think about all the hard training weâÄôve done this year. I knew I couldnâÄôt lose it on the last 25. I raced hard to the wall.âÄùWith the victory, Tyler became just the second Gophers swimmer to win the NCAA title in the 100 breast and the first to achieve All-America status four consecutive years in the same event.On the heels of her championship on the 1-meter board, Bryant finished second in the 3-meter dive. The 2010 3-meter champ finished 13.50 points short of first place and back-to-back titles.last_img read more

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Study: Americans are more likely than Chinese to want to be ‘a big frog in a small pond’

first_imgPinterest LinkedIn Share Share on Twitter Share on Facebookcenter_img Email Culture matters it comes to being a the big frog in a small pond or the small frog in a big pond. New research has found that Americans would rather be remarkable in an average place, while Chinese would rather be average in a remarkable place.Psychologist Kaidi Wu of the University of Michigan, the study’s corresponding author, told PsyPost that she was interested in the topic for two main reasons.“It is hard to imagine going through life without having to make frog-pond decisions: which school to go to, which internship to choose, which company to work for,” she explained. “What we end up choosing has downstream consequences and may significantly alter the paths of our lives. It is no surprise that this topic has interested sociologists, economists, and educational psychologists for decades. However, although these studies tell you how you would feel after you’ve joined the “pond” of your choice, I have always wondered how people come to these decisions in the first place.” “Which brings me to the second reason. It’s a well-known adage in the West that ‘it is better to be the big frog in a small pond.’ I grew up in Shanghai, and I wasn’t really familiar with this idiomatic expression until I arrived in the U.S. Nonetheless, I am well aware of frog-pond quandaries each time I encountered them. “What’s interesting is that cultures around the world have come up with a myriad of metaphors,” Wu continued. “They all recognize the same decision dilemma, but have different ways of going about it. The Chinese have a saying that ‘it’s better to be the head of a chicken than the tail of a phoenix’, whereas the Koreans sometimes acknowledge ‘it’s better to be the tail of a dragon than being the head of snake’. Be it the ‘Frog-Pond’ or the ‘Chicken-Phoenix’, these adages paint a kaleidoscopic canvas of decision-making that is culturally informed. And I thought it would be interesting to explore the diversity in frog-pond decision-making rather than just proffering a universal solution.”In their three-part study, Wu and her colleagues found that Americans were more likely than Chinese to prefer being a “big frog in a small pond” rather than a “small frog in a big pond.” When given the option of attending a top 10 ranked college while having below-average grades or attending a top 100 ranked college while having above-average grades, Americans tended to choose the second option.The study, which was published in the Social Psychological and Personality Science, examined 888 students and working adults from the U.S. and China.“We often hear about the touted benefits of being the ‘big frog in a small pond.’ But the choices we make are the products of our culture. The next time you are faced with a frog-pond dilemma, take heart that there is not one right way of choosing; nor is there a universal standard of a single rational decision to be made,” Wu said.“It is easy to have preconceived notions about cultural differences. In the psychological literature, it has been long known that East Asians (the ‘collectivists’) tend to attune to a collective self embedded in social groups, whereas Westerners (the ‘individualists’) tend to focus on an individual self as a distinctive agent. So if we just look at the overall pattern that Chinese are more likely to choose the big pond, it is tempting to think Chinese don’t want to be the big frog as much as Americans, because as a collective whole, Chinese may not want to engage in social comparison within the pond in order to preserve social harmony.”“But that was not the case. The real reason Chinese go for the big pond is that they are more concerned about prestige.”“The caveat here is that as we draw cultural delineations, it is easy to end up with a reductionist way of construing opposing schemas: West – individualism, independence, analytic thinking; East – collectivism, interdependence, holistic thinking. But cultures are complex, porous, dynamic, ever-changing,” Wu told PsyPost. “Although it might be intuitive to conjure up collectivists who are cooperative and less inclined to compare themselves with others, they are not. In fact, we found Chinese are much more likely to engage in social comparison than Americans. Other qualitative accounts have also revealed strong desire to compete and achieve even within one’s pond (you may have seen the ‘Asian grading scale’ meme – A is average, B is bad, C is crap, F is find another family).” “To fathom any cultural phenomena, we need to delve into the social structure and historical underpinnings of the culture of study, and be willing to entertain possibilities beyond the individualism-collectivism dichotomy. Otherwise we might end up with an impoverished understanding with a specious reasoning.”“If cultures across the globe differ in their propensity to choose the “big pond”, what does this mean as the world becomes more globalized and when cultures interact? Over the past ten years, U.S. colleges witnessed a dramatic 85% increase of international students, a majority of whom hail from Asia. Coming from cultures that place a heavy emphasis on prestige and obtaining an elite education, it makes sense for Asian internationals to vie for the big pond. “In fact, many Chinese international students have gone to great lengths to get into (or help their children get into) top U.S. colleges,” Wu told PsyPost. “But what appears to be a culturally normative choice in China may not be one in the U.S. If you look at top executives at Fortune 100 companies from 1980 to 2011, the percentage of those with an Ivy League undergraduate degree has decreased. If you didn’t come from a big pond, you can still do well in life. “This doesn’t mean that people should give up on their pursuit of the big pond all together, but it pays to think twice about consequences of being the small frog: sinking to the bottom of the class risking being expelled, language difficulties, mental health struggles. At the end of the day, is it worth choosing the big pond – in a cultural context where big frogs in small ponds can also succeed?”The study, “Frogs, Ponds, and Culture: Variations in Entry Decisions“, was also co-authored by Stephen M. Garcia and Shirli Kopelman.last_img read more

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Continental Automotive Systems Appoints New Aftermarket Director

first_imgLSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  AUBURN HILLS, MI — Continental Automotive Systems has appointed David Mestdagh director of its North American aftermarket business. In this position, Mestdagh will be responsible for the overall business strategy, product quality and performance; as well as development of effective sales and marketing activities in North America for the ATE brand of products. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement Prior to joining Continental, Mestdagh served as national accounts sales manager for Visteon’s aftermarket group, where he led a sales team responsible for a range of program support, retail, co-manufacturing, export and traditional distribution channels. Before that, he held various sales, marketing, finance and logistics positions at Federal-Mogul, including national retail sales manager, program group manager and sales and marketing development manager. Mestdagh is a member of the Automotive Aftermarket Industry Association (AAIA) Leadership Development Network, and has received his Automotive Aftermarket Professional designation from the University of the Aftermarket. For additional information about Continental, go to: www.conti-online.com. _______________________________________ Click here to view the rest of today’s headlines.,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain.last_img read more

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Legals land in City at empty UBS nest

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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EDITORIAL: Keep up legislative pressure for fair COVID-19 concert refund policies

first_imgGAZETTE COVID-19 COVERAGEThe Daily Gazette is committed to keeping our community safe and informed and is offering our COVID-19 coverage to you free.Our subscribers help us bring this information to you. Please consider a subscription at DailyGazette.com/Subscribe to help support these efforts.Thank YouWhile those companies have in the last couple of weeks modified their refund policies under pressure from state and federal lawmakers, it’s clear that legislation is needed to protect consumers from having to wait too long for their money when concerts are canceled or postponed.And it’s clear that state and federal officials need to continue investigating how these companies are dealing with our money.What prompted government intervention   was a large number of people finding out they couldn’t get refunds for certain concerts that had technically only been postponed, not canceled.A policy change in March by Ticketmaster to only offer refunds on canceled concerts prompted a call for a state attorney general investigation into its refund policies. Members of Congress also piped in, and all that outrage compelled companies to change their policies.According to Rolling Stone, AEG now will give ticket holders 30 days to request a full refund to shows that have already been rescheduled with solidified dates. Tickets for shows that have been postponed — but do not yet have publicly confirmed replacement dates — will not be eligible for refunds until new dates are announced, Rolling Stone reported. With Live Nation, if your event was canceled, you will be automatically get a refund. If your event has been postponed, tickets will be valid for the new date. If you then want a refund, you have 30 days to request it, starting from the announcement of the new show date, according to the Vulture website.For more details on specific company policies, visit their respective websites. Categories: Editorial, OpinionBecause of the coronavirus, we’re not going to concerts.But many performers and the ticket companies that manage their shows have been acting as if we are.While people struggle to pay bills, entertainment companies like Live Nation and AEG had been clinging to old refund policies or modifying existing ones so they could hold onto your ticket money even longer.They’ve done this by not officially canceling concerts, but instead only declaring them “postponed.” GAZETTE COVID-19 COVERAGEThe Daily Gazette is committed to keeping our community safe and informed and is offering our COVID-19 coverage to you free.Our subscribers help us bring this information to you. Please consider a subscription at DailyGazette.com/Subscribe to help support these efforts.Thank YouMore from The Daily Gazette:HIGH NOTES: PPEs, fighting hunger, backpacks and supplies for kidsEDITORIAL: Don’t repeal bail reform law; Fix it the right wayEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Make a game plan for voting. Do it now.EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censuscenter_img How long customers waiting for concerts to be rescheduled will have to wait for their refunds is unknown. If you’re one of those fans, you have no recourse but to wait. That’s not right.Customers need more government protection so they can get their money back when they feel they’re not getting what they paid for.Even though these entertainment companies changed their policies in response to political pressure, there’s nothing stopping them from changing their policies again later.Ticket buyers shouldn’t have to bombard the government with complaints and jump through hoops, and legislators shouldn’t have to make threats, for consumers to their own money back.The state Senate Investigation and Government Operations Committee needs to continue its investigation into ticket company policies to ensure they’re fair and that they put consumers above corporate profits.And the state Legislature and Congress need to pass more clear and consistent legislation to make sure such a situation doesn’t arise again.last_img read more

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Cryostar refines distribution in North America

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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CEE and Priority Cargo Network meet in Bremen

first_imgCEE brings together asset-based forwarders, while the Priority Cargo Network links general freight forwarders.The events included presentations and discussions about the past, present and future of networks as well as the market outlook.There were changes to the CEE network’s board of advisors, with Rudiger Glanzel of Direct Intercontinental and Carlos Guimet of Multitrade Spain elected to join SAL Heavy Lift’s Kai-Stefan Vogel and Sergey Ovsienko of Beluga Projects.After the conference and meetings between members, delegates enjoyed a guided tour of the Beck’s brewery, followed by dinner onboard the Alexander von Humboldt on the River Weser.Both conferences will take place in Bremen again next year, a day ahead of the annual Breakbulk Europe exhibition held in the German city.www.cargoequipmentexperts.comwww.prioritycargonetwork.comlast_img read more

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