the Wash: Dunbar High School teacher changing lives one bike ride at a time

first_imgThe pandemic has presented many challenges for kids, from adapting to online classes to taking away extra-curricular activities that may have kept them out of trouble.Alex Clark, physical education teacher at Dunbar High School and founder of Prime Ability, an organization using mentoring and sports training to reach young people of all ages, realized the dilemma kids were facing and went on a hunt to find bikes and funding to start his Stay Prime biking program. “Just staying in the house and thinking that you’re going to stay out the way and not get in trouble is easier said than done when you have so many distractions in your face,” Clark said.Alex Clark (far right), said one take away from the Stay Prime program is that you are totally in control of what your path is and that the bike rides are used as examples of life. (Courtesy of Prime Ability)Through the program, every Monday and Wednesday afternoon since Sept. 14., kids in the Petworth community and surrounding areas meet up at Dunbar high school to cycle to different locations in the District. Sky Mabry,17, junior at DHS, said riding with her Stay Prime family is more than just riding bikes — it has given her a new perspective on life.“It’s actually really fun, and it’s basically like an escape from reality, just riding a bike and feeling the wind blow past you,” Mabry said. “It’s eye-opening and life-changing.”Student Sky Mabry, on how the program has impacted her:Audio Playerhttp://thewash.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Stay-Prime-Sky-_mixdown.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Every week Clark creates a new route for the high schoolers to bike, and recently they biked their longest trail from Dunbar to Anacostia Park and back. Clark also encourages an overall philosophy for the cyclists called H.E.A.R.T., which stands for humility, effort, ambition, respect and teamwork. At each meetup, he focuses instruction on one of those five words, coaching the students through what it means and how to apply it to their daily lives.“The kids are not just learning about cycling and about themselves but learning valid communication skills and networking skills that are going to help them propel as they journey throughout high school and into their professional lives,” Clark said.Clark also said the program helps improve their fitness and physical ability, but the kids look at it as an opportunity to be better. Eighteen-year-old student-athlete Chris Mateo agrees.“It helps me stay in shape but actually coming to this program makes you feel motivated like I can do anything and it keeps me busy,” Mateo said.According to the Metropolitan Police Department, since 2019, there has been a 20% increase in homicides and a 5% increase in assaults with a dangerous weapon in the District. After two kids from DHS were killed last year, Clark said he knew he had to do something within his organization, specifically for kids at DHS and in high-crime and -poverty neighborhoods surrounding Dunbar, such as Sursum Corda and Saratoga.“One kid had just graduated, and he got shot on a Monday and he was leaving to go to Temple University on Thursday,” Clark said. “Two days later, we had another kid who got shot and killed. He was going to be a senior this year and worked his butt off to get back on the football field because he was ineligible last year. He was just trying to make the best of his life.”On their first bike ride 15 kids showed up, and in just two months participation increased to about 40-50 kids per ride. (Courtesy of Prime Ability)Clark began his program by introducing it to his students as extra credit. In just a short time, Stay Prime has increased its cycling participation by at least 30% and now has a total of 120 kids in the biking program. Clark’s success may be due to his character. “He’s courageous to start a program like this, not knowing if people will show up or not,” Mabry said about Clark. “He’s persistent. He tries to get people to come out just to experience it no matter what.”Clark said he had received a great deal of support from volunteers and created partnerships with organizations such as We Ride DC and Perfect Timing Multisport to teach kids about bike safety and how to fix bikes. But Clark said his most prominent supporter has been Dunbar High School Principal Nadine Smith. “My principal has been monumental in this whole process. I’ve never dealt with a leader in my entire career that has supported me as much as she has,” Clark said. “She texts and emails me all the time to see how we can make this better.”Stay Prime wrapped up its first cycling season on Nov. 18 with a socially distant end of season celebration at DHS. The program will resume on March 15. The next step for the organization is to get more exposure, engage with city officials and get funding to expand the program.“The next challenge for our program is to make it bigger and be into more schools,” Clark said. “So that we can challenge more students.”Student-athlete Chris Mateo, on how he views Prime Ability mentor Alex Clark:Audio Playerhttp://thewash.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Stay-Prime-Mateo_mixdown.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.,Fear growing in ICE detention centers as COVID-19 cases steadily climb this winter. Immigration organizations and lawyers are fighting for better health care but are afraid it’s…,Families must wait longer than usual to set up funerals for lost loved ones in another grim consequence of the enduring pandemic.,Black Lives Matter activists and community organizers march outside the L.A. mayor’s…last_img read more

Read More

Economic Update: July Class III milk price tops $24.50; PPDs will be negative

first_imgUpdate HighlightsJuly Class III milk price tops $24.50; PPDs will be negativeGlobal Dairy Trade index dropsAg Economy Barometer reveals business changes due to COVID-19Chapter 12 bankruptcy news is mixedUSDA extends RMA deadlines, defers interest accrual July Class III milk price tops $24.50; PPDs will be negativeJuly’s Federal Milk Marketing Order (FMMO) Class III milk price jumped another $3.50 from June to $24.54 per hundredweight (cwt). It’s $6.99 higher than a year ago. The last time the Class III price was above $24.50 per cwt was in September 2014.advertisementadvertisementThe July 2020 Class IV milk price rose just 86 cents from June to $13.76 per cwt. It’s down $3.14 from July 2019.Final July uniform prices and producer price differentials (PPDs) will depend on the level of depooling in each Federal Milk Marketing Order (FMMO). The class price disparity will again provide ample incentive for Class III depooling.As in June, the July Class III milk price is substantially higher than the Class I base price ($16.56 per cwt), the Class II price ($13.79 per cwt) and the Class IV milk price ($13.76 per cwt). While the difference between the Class III and Class I base price in July ($7.98 per cwt) shrunk a little from June ($9.62 per cwt), the difference between the July Class III price and the Class IV price grew to $10.78 per cwt.July FMMO information, including uniform price and PPD calculations will start to be announced late next week. Here’s a reminder of June data. Read: Negative PPD impact will likely vary by order, handler.advertisementThrough the first seven months of 2020, the Class III price averaged $17.30 per cwt, the highest for that period since 2014. The January-July 2020 Class IV price averaged $13.78 per cwt, down $2.23 for the same period a year ago.Global Dairy Trade index dropsAfter posting steady to stronger prices since the end of May, the index of Global Dairy Trade (GDT) dairy product prices was down 5.1% in the latest auction, held Aug. 4.A price summary of individual product categories follows:Skim milk powder was down 4.6% to $2,583 per metric ton (MT).Butter was down 2.8% to $3,438 per MT.Whole milk powder was down 7.5% to $3,003 per MT.Cheddar cheese was down 5.3% to $3,568 per MT.The next GDT auction is Aug. 18.Ag Economy Barometer reveals business changes due to COVID-19The Purdue University/CME Group “Ag Economy Barometer” provides a monthly snapshot of farmer sentiment regarding the state of the agricultural economy. In addition, it reveals producer insights into other topics impacting their businesses.advertisementThe monthly survey collects responses from 400 producers whose annual market value of production is equal to or exceeds $500,000. Minimum targets by enterprise are as follows: 53% corn/soybeans, 14% wheat, 3% cotton, 19% beef cattle, 5% dairy and 6% hogs.The latest survey, released Aug. 4, indicates overall farmer sentiment is improving, but still hasn’t reached levels of optimism seen before the COVID-19 pandemic began in February. The survey was conducted from July 20-24.The July survey found farmers were less concerned about the current economic situation on their farms but were also less optimistic about the future. Two-thirds of those responding said they believe Congress should provide additional economic assistance to farmers in 2020 to help offset the pandemic’s impact on agriculture.Four out of 10 respondents said they are conducting more business online as a result of COVID-19.Just two out of 10 farmers said they have a marketing adviser to help them make marketing decisions. Of those who utilize marketing advisers, about 36% said they chose their adviser based on advice from another producer, while 16% recommendations from an agribusiness firm.The impact of COVID-19 has changed the way producers get their information. Over half of farmers responding to the July survey said they were less likely to attend in-person educational events in 2020 as a result of COVID-19 concerns. When asked what their top information source would be in lieu of attending in-person events, 36% chose farm magazines, 19% chose online webinars, 17% chose farm radio and 17% chose websites.Looking ahead, 56% of producers reported they plan to reduce their farm machinery purchases compared to a year ago, while 38% of surveyed producers reported they plan to keep machinery purchases about the same as last year.Chapter 12 bankruptcy news is mixedThere was mixed news in the latest analysis of Chapter 12 farm bankruptcy filing data from the American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF).While the number of Chapter 12 filings slowed in the first six months of 2020 to 284, filings were up 8% (to 580) for the 12-month period ending June 30, 2020, according to AFBF chief economist John Newton.The lower number of filings through the first half of 2020 – at a time when farmers and ranchers are struggling with the impact of COVID-19 – is due in large part to federal financial assistance, Newton said. With provisions of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act, including direct payments to agricultural producers through the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP), there’s a high likelihood the number of Chapter 12 filings will increase without additional financial assistance.Bankruptcy rates over the previous 12 months were the highest in the Midwest, Northwest and Southeast. Farmers in these regions filed a combined 464 bankruptcies, representing 80% of the filings across the U.S.At nearly 300 filings, a 23% increase, more than 50% of the Chapter 12 filings were in the 13-state Midwest region. The Southeast had 122 Chapter 12 filings, an increase of 22% over prior-year levels. Chapter 12 farm bankruptcies were the highest in Wisconsin at 69, 24 more than the prior 12-month period.USDA extends RMA deadlines, defers interest accrualThe USDA’s Risk Management Agency (RMA) announced it will authorize approved insurance providers (AIPs) to extend deadlines for premium and administrative fee payments, defer the resulting interest accrual, and allow other flexibilities to help farmers, ranchers and insurance providers due to the COVID-19 pandemic.Specifically, the USDA is authorizing AIPs to provide policyholders additional time to pay premium and administrative fees and to waive accrual of interest to the earlier of 60 days after their scheduled payment due date or the termination date on policies with premium billing dates between Aug. 1, 2020, and Sept. 30, 2020. In addition, the USDA is authorizing AIPs to provide up to an additional 60 days for policyholders to make payment and waive additional interest for written payment agreements due between Aug. 1, 2020, and Sept. 30, 2020.   Dave NatzkeEditorProgressive DairyEmail Dave [email protected]last_img read more

Read More

Madrid goalkeeper seen as ‘one of the first options’ for Man…

first_imgMundo Deportivo reported on Tuesday that the ‘first diagnosis’ suggests the Chilean international could be out for the rest of the season.Pep Guardiola is now left with Daniel Grimshaw as a back up to Ederson and the former is yet to make his first team debut at the Etihad.The Catalan newspaper reported Barcelona’s Jasper Cillessen has emerged as a target for the English club, which was ruled out by Sport.Embed from Getty ImagesSpanish newspaper AS now claims the Premier League winners are looking to bring in a player and Real Madrid keeper Keylor Navas would be ‘one of the first options’ for City. He has two years left on his contract with the Champions League winners and has expressed his desire to continue at Santiago Bernabeu, despite Thibaut Courtois’ arrival. The 13-time European champions are willing to allow the Costa Rican custodian join City, if he asks Real Madrid for a transfer.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksTrending TodayForge of Empires – Free Online GameDon’t Play This Game, it’s Addictive.Forge of Empires – Free Online GameUndoRaid: Shadow Legends | Free DownloadEven Non-Gamers Are Obsessed With This RPG Game (It’s Worth Installing!)Raid: Shadow Legends | Free DownloadUndoStanChart by CNBC CatalystDigitization in Banks Is No Longer About Efficiency, but Business Resilience. Don’t Get Left Behind.StanChart by CNBC CatalystUndoInstant Voice TranslatorGenius Japanese Invention Allows You To Instantly Speak 43 LanguagesInstant Voice TranslatorUndoKeto减肥1個簡單的妙招一夜「融化」腹部贅肉(今晚試試)Keto减肥UndoCNBC InternationalSingapore’s Freelancers Find New Income During the Coronavirus Pandemic.CNBC InternationalUndoDating.comThe Most Handsome Men In Hong Kong On This Dating SiteDating.comUndoPerfect-Dating.comReveal Tung Chung As The Best City to Date for Love & RomancePerfect-Dating.comUndoTheTopFiveVPNEnjoy Netflix Now Without Any RestrictionsTheTopFiveVPNUndo Two days ago, Manchester City confirmed Claudio Bravo has “sustained an achilles tendon injury in training”.last_img read more

Read More

‘Lost Recipes’ book tells story of bygone restaurants, inns

first_imgA new cookbook called “The Book of Lost Recipes” remembers classic dishes from long-gone hotels, iconic restaurants and roadside eateries of yesteryear. But the book is more than a collection of recipes. It also chronicles the evolution of American food culture, telling stories of how and why certain dishes and restaurants became popular when they did.“A good restaurant, a restaurant that becomes famous or that a community cares about — it has to do with food, but it has to do with so much more,” said cookbook author Jaya Saxena, a writer for The Daily Dot. “The things people are driven to eat are influenced by the economy, politics, immigration trends and all kinds of other things.”A recurring theme in the book, out this month from Page Street Publishing, is how immigrant chefs took ethnic food mainstream. There are recipes from establishments like Paoli’s Restaurant (Italian) in San Francisco, Ruby Chow’s (Chinese) in Seattle, and iconic Jewish delis like Ashkenaz’s in Chicago and Wolfie’s Rascal House in Miami.Celebrity culture gets its turn in the book, too, with recipes from Chasen’s, a West Hollywood joint that hosted the likes of Liz Taylor and Ronald Reagan, and The Pump Room in Chicago, which Frank Sinatra referenced in a song. Other dishes in the book were beloved by regular folk, like chicken soup and mac-and-cheese from Horn & Hardart’s, the famed automat.This image provided by Page Street Publishing shows the cover of “The Book of Lost Recipes” by Jaya Saxena. The new cookbook takes readers on a nostalgic trip down memory lane to explore classic dishes served in famous hotels of yesteryear and other bygone destinations. (Page Street Publishing via AP)Many recipes offer a window into travel trends and pop culture. Saxena describes, for example, how tiki culture, a fake, kooky mashup of South Pacific motifs, reigned supreme at the Kahiki Supper Club in Columbus, Ohio. And how a dude ranch in Tucson, Arizona, opened an upscale restaurant called The Tack Room so that its guests — who came to Arizona to escape cold weather — could enjoy fancy meals like veal with chanterelle mushrooms after a long day of riding horses.Saxena not only pored over old guidebooks to see what restaurants were recommended as worthwhile for diners to seek out on their travels, but she also tracked down descendants of chefs and restaurant owners to get their stories. Once she had an original recipe in hand, she scaled it down from restaurant-size portions to family-size. She has no formal training as a chef, but with help from her mom and others, each dish was tested in a home kitchen.A few of the lost recipes sound archaic today or involve obscure ingredients, like one for roast venison with currant port sauce from New York’s long-defunct Planters Hotel. But other dishes would be right at home in any hipster cafe in Brooklyn, like bratwurst and sweet-and-sour lentils, created by a German immigrant, Henry Thiele, a famous restaurateur in the Pacific Northwest who was admired by none other than a young James Beard. The sausage-and-lentils dish is one of Saxena’s favorites.“This recipe from 50 or 60 years ago tasted current, like the upscale comfort food that has become such a big thing,” she said. “I could see people eating this for hundreds of years in Germany but it also appeals to a modern palate.”ASHKENAZ’S BLINTZ TREAT(From “The Book of Lost Recipes” by Jaya Saxena, Page Street Publishing Co., 2016)Start to finish: 20 minutesServings: 6For the crepes:1 cup all-purpose flour1 ¼ cups waterPinch saltVegetable oil (for cooking)For the cheese mix:1 pound dried farmers cheese or dried baker’s cheese1 egg6 tablespoons sugarFor garnishing:Sour cream, apple sauce and sugared blueberriesTo make the crepes, heat an 8-inch pan over medium-low heat. Whisk together the flour, water and salt, and grease the pan lightly with vegetable oil or butter, using a towel to apply so all corners of the pan are covered. When the pan is hot, pour about half a ladle of batter into the pan, and turn the pan to spread it as thin as possible. When the crepe begins to curl (after about a minute), flip it onto a paper towel.For the filling, stir together the cheese and eggs, sprinkling sugar on top of the mixture as you turn it in. The mixture should still be firm. Lay about ¼ cup of the mixture on the blintz in a 4-inch row. Fold the sides of the crepe over, and roll the blintz back to front. Heat a half-inch of vegetable oil in a pan. Once the oil is hot, fry blintzes (being sure not to crowd the pan) for 2-3 minutes per side, until they’re lightly golden and crispy. Remove blintzes to a paper towel to drain, and place on a heated serving platter.Serve with sour cream or apple sauce, and sugared blueberries.Nutrition information per serving: 234 calories; 72 calories from fat; 8 g fat (4 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 60 mg cholesterol; 110 mg sodium; 29 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 9 g sugar; 19 g protein.last_img read more

Read More