Canada Para-Dressage Riders at WEG

first_img Horse Sport Enews SIGN UP Email* We’ll send you our regular newsletter and include you in our monthly giveaways. PLUS, you’ll receive our exclusive Rider Fitness digital edition with 15 exercises for more effective riding. More from Horse Sport:Christilot Boylen Retires From Team SportAfter an exemplary career as one of Canada’s top Dressage riders, seven-time Olympian Christilot Boylen has announced her retirement from team competition.2020 Royal Agricultural Winter Fair CancelledFor only the second time in its history, The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair has been cancelled but plans are being made for some virtual competitions.Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Statement on 2020 EventAs the Province of Ontario starts to reopen, The Royal’s Board and staff will adhere to all recommendations put forward by government and health officials.Government Financial Assistance for Ontario FarmersOntario Equestrian has recently released this update of several financial assistance packages available, including those for farm business. Subscribe to the Horse Sport newsletter and get an exclusive bonus digital edition! Canadian Grade 4 Para-Dressage riders competed in the Individual Championship test on October 6 at the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games (WEG) held in Lexington, KY, taking place October 5–9, 2010.Eleonore Elstone of Langley, BC, was the first in for Canada riding Why Not G, a seven-year-old Dutch Warmblood gelding owned by Elstone and Kelleigh Kulscar. The pair performed a very impressive test highlighted by excellent lateral work at the trot and canter. Elstone and Why Not G scored 64.903% for eighth place in the Grade 4 Individual Championship test.“I really liked today’s ride,” said Elstone. “Why Not G really wanted to be in the ring with me today and be my partner. It was really wonderful to ride him. In preparation of Sunday’s Freestyle, I am going to school exactly as I did today.”Competing as an Individual for Canada, Madison Lawson of Bonfield, ON made her debut at the World Championship level of competition with her horse McGuire, a 13-year-old Canadian Sport Horse gelding. They earned a score of 61.419% for 15th place.“I am really proud to be here. It feels amazing, and it is an honour to ride for Canada,” said Lawson.  “We have a lot to work on, but I am only 16-years-old, so I have a lot more to learn. McGuire was really good, and I am really pleased with him. I am going to work on my lateral work to get it more rhythmic leading up to my Freestyle.”“Eleonore is a little bit disappointed in the scores she received today. We all thought that she had a better ride today than yesterday,” said Elizabeth Quigg-Robinson, chef d’équipe of the Canadian Para-Dressage Team. “Madison did an excellent job for her first major games. She really put it together and stayed very cool in the ring. Madison and her horse are a nice combination and I think they have a great future together.”The Para-Dressage Team competition continues on October 7th when Lauren Barwick of Aldergrove, BC and her horse Maile and Jennifer McKenzie of Maple Ridge, BC, and Sunbury Lodge Voodoo will ride their Individual Championship Test. The combined scores from the Team Test and the Individual Championship Test will determine the Team medals.Canadian riders competing as individuals—Sharon Buffitt of Pointe-Claire, QC, and Tara Kowalski of Chilliwack, BC—will also compete with all the team members in the second day of Individual Championship Tests on October 7 and the Freestyle Test on October 8th and 9th.last_img read more

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October 1, 2010 Letters

first_img October 1, 2010 Letters October 1, 2010 Letters Letters Law and Medicine I read with interest the plan by Florida State University to publish an e-journal to increase the flow of information between the law and medicine. As someone who practiced medicine for several years before obtaining my law degree, I feel qualified to respond. My opinions relate solely to the legal practice of medical malpractice.The standard of care the law applies to physicians bears little resemblance to the standard with which they practice medicine. Upon prescribing medical treatment, the physician must ask, “Is there scientific proof that the treatment prescribed is effective?” This represents evidence-based medicine and stems from the peer-reviewed, scientific method.Unfortunately, the legal standard all too often reflects an expert’s own opinion devoid of any scientific basis. That opinion is purposefully framed in a persuasive manner to support the retaining party, which often encourages intellectually dishonest testimony. While judges have leeway under rules of evidence to exclude such testimony, few actually do as they lack the medical knowledge to honestly evaluate that testimony, which becomes a matter of fact.Of course, few med/mal cases are ever tried. Physicians thus throw up their hands in disgust, left alone to ponder how the law, supposedly about truth and justice, could support a system so flawed.These issues run much deeper, however, and strike at the core of honest and ethical representation of the physician.I see attorneys purposefully not filing dispositive motions on behalf of their physician-client for fear they might succeed, which dries up that revenue stream. I know of senior attorneys informing junior associates not to file motions for summary judgment for fear they may win. I am aware of a number of attorneys and even risk-management teams who refuse to cooperate, purely for financial reasons, with physicians who pursue proactive methods proven to reduce non-meritorious claims. They want those lawsuits as they represent billable hours. I point no fingers, as this simply “is.”The annual Gallup poll on Honesty/Ethics in Professions, in November 2009, found 65 percent of respondents rated physicians as either “very high” or “high.” Contrast that to only 13 percent for the legal profession. No doubt, the actions mentioned above contributed to those numbers. Why, as attorneys, do we do so little to correct this grave problem?A Harvard study found that 54 percent of monies awarded patients injured by negligence went to “administrative” costs, including attorney’s fees. The gross inefficiency of the system is unnecessary and is easily improved, if only the desire existed. This would benefit injured patients and help avoid costly and time-consuming frivolous claims and the resultant personal turmoil caused innocent physicians.I would challenge not only the FSU e-journal to explore these issues, but The Florida Bar to engage and work with the many national medical societies who have adopted expert witness guidelines to ensure those guidelines promote fair, honest, and ethical testimony.I lose little sleep that the public holds the law with such distain or that the law promotes such intellectual dishonestly when it comes to medical malpractice. I am greatly troubled, however, by the fact that so few attorneys seem to care. I pray for the legal profession that I am wrong.Robert W. Patton Clearwater Bar’s Website The Florida Bar has an alleged website. Allegedly, members and the general public can access that website for the purpose of finding a lawyer, checking on a lawyer, getting information regarding CLE, unauthorized practice of law, legal research on Fastcase, etc. It is, in fact, nearly impossible to gain any meaningful access to The Florida Bar website. It is without a doubt the most incompetently designed and maintained website I’ve ever tried to use.In the first place, it is unbelievably slow if and when it works at all. Usually it doesn’t work at all. Usually one gets the home page and nothing more. Sometimes, if you exit and try again, it will move on to the page you want, but more usually it doesn’t.In this “information age” in which we live and work, the Internet, and the ability to access it quickly and efficiently, is an indispensable fact of life. Businesses and organizations routinely operate good, useful, and valuable websites without any significant difficulty. Why is The Florida Bar’s website useless and worthless? Computer hardware and software have advanced to the point where top-flight systems can be obtained with great economy. We do not have to put up with a last-class website that does not work.Be assured that I am not alone in my criticism. Every lawyer I’ve spoken to who has tried to use The Florida Bar website has expressed the same thought. I suggest that the Bar assess its website with an eye to building one that we can use and be proud of.William E. Lowe Bradenton Editor’s Note: The Bar’s website is designed for optimum usability with Internet Explorer and Mozilla browsers. Based on user statistics, 96 percent of visitors access the site with these browsers. Other proprietary browsers create issues for users because they use a copy of the site from past visits rather than loading the live site. The Florida Bar is continuously working to improve its website and recently completed a major study involving hundreds of Bar members providing input and suggestions. The study recommendations are now being applied. Monthly, the site has more than 16.7 million hits and in the latest Bar Membership Opinion survey, 91 percent of Bar members said the site was average or above average in terms of its content and ease of use compared to other legal websites. Foreclosure I write from the frustrating foreclosure trenches of Palm Beach County to challenge the assumption that clearing the backlog of foreclosures is necessarily a good idea.The untested, unproven underlying assumption behind throwing millions of dollars at our court system to reduce the foreclosure backlog is that the sooner we clear ’em out, the sooner the houses can get back on the market; and although it might be bad at first, we can climb out of the hole that much quicker if we just get ’er done.This assumption is plain horse hockey. I don’t see it as my taxpayer civic duty to provide a clearinghouse beyond the norm for banks and speculative lenders, many of whom were downright deceptive and dishonest in how they generated all this hoopla in the first place.I’m not saying the lenders don’t get to have keys to the courthouse. I just don’t believe we need to make them their own special keys and give them their own office space and support system for free and over and above the legitimate needs of everyone else. It’s not just a dollars-and-cents issue either: Why should rapists, muggers, and less palatable crooks have to wait whilst we bend over backwards to help these lenders?I say horse hockey, because if the banks suddenly had control of more than 63,000 homes (the foreclosure backlog) in this county — just in time for Christmas — any recovery/stabilization of the housing market we’ve seen to date will crater with no end in sight. Additionally, right now some banks, seeing that they can’t just come in and throw a family into the street, have to deal with families. There is a business decision to be made that allows families to work it out with the lenders when the lenders know they have to otherwise wait a good long time.I say horse hockey, because the banks don’t really want these properties. The September 1 News touched on that, but only in passing. These banks don’t do anything to take care of the properties they get, and they stiff condo and homeowners’ associations every chance they get. Go ahead, try to sue them; you’ll wait a long time, since all our resources are going to do their dirty work.What we really need is to take both a liberal and a conservative attitude to this mess: Liberal, in that we need the courts to remember that foreclosure is a matter of equity and the homeowner should be protected as broadly as possible; conservative, in that most all government involvement should cease. That is, using nothing other than the common law and equity, the courts should simply be letting the parties work out full and fair common sense business solutions. As it is, even in court-ordered mediation, our hands are tied.For example, if a property is worth $200,000 and the loan is $300,000, and if next year that same property is going to be worth only $100,000, then let the parties agree to cut their losses and move on. Not fair to the banks? Then make the banks tell us how much of these losses were bailed out on.I know some people will react negatively to what I’m saying (can’t let deadbeats be rewarded), but we need to practice a bit of forgiveness and there-but-for-the-grace-of-God-go-I mentality. It does not matter what happened, why it happened, or who is to blame anymore. Foreclosures themselves are the problem. Putting people into the streets is going to be a bigger problem. Let’s simply cut our losses. Work it out. Live and let live.Tim Morell Boynton Beachlast_img read more

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APA: Majority Of Adults Stressed By Mass Shootings

first_imgAPA News: WASHINGTON, D.C. — A large majority of adults in the United States are stressed by mass shootings, and a third of U.S. adults say that fear of mass shootings stops them from going to certain places and events, according to a new survey on stress and mass shootings by the American Psychological Association.  Methodology Hispanic adults (32%) are more likely than white non-Hispanic adults (15%) to say they experience stress often or constantly related to the possibility of a mass shooting. Hispanic adults and African American adults also are more likely than white non-Hispanic adults to say they do not know how to cope with the stress they feel as a result of mass shootings (44% of Hispanic adults and 43% of African American adults vs. 30% of white adults). Black adults are more likely to feel that they or someone they know will be a victim of a mass shooting (60% compared with 41% of white adults and 50% of Hispanic adults). For additional information on stress and behavioral health, visit www.apa.org/helpcenter. Join the conversation about stress on Twitter by following @APA and #stressAPA.  To download related graphics, and for information on managing distress in the aftermath of a mass shooting, visit www.stressinamerica.org. Women report feeling stressed more often than men about the possibility of a shooting (85% vs. 71%), and parents of children under the age of 18 are nearly twice as likely as those without children under 18 to say they experience stress often or constantly because of the possibility of a mass shooting (28% vs.16%). Further, 62% of parents say they “live in fear that their children will be victims of a mass shooting”.  The survey found that more than three-quarters of adults (79%) in the U.S. say they experience stress as a result of the possibility of a mass shooting. Additionally, many adults report that they are changing their behavior due to fear of mass shootings. Nearly one in three adults (32%) feel they cannot go anywhere without worrying about being a victim of a mass shooting, while just about the same number (33%) say fear prevents them from going to certain places or events. Nearly one-quarter (24%) of adults report changing how they live their lives because of fear of a mass shooting.  All sample surveys and polls, whether or not they use probability sampling, are subject to multiple sources of error that are most often not possible to quantify or estimate, including sampling error, coverage error, error associated with nonresponse, error associated with question wording and response options, and post-survey weighting and adjustments. Therefore, the words “margin of error” are avoided, as they are misleading. All that can be calculated are different possible sampling errors with different probabilities for pure, unweighted, random samples with 100% response rates. These are only theoretical because no published polls come close to this ideal.center_img “It’s clear that mass shootings are taking a toll on our mental health, and we should be particularly concerned that they are affecting the way many of us are living our daily lives,” said Arthur C. Evans Jr., PhD, APA’s chief executive officer. “The more these events happen in places where people can see themselves frequenting, the greater the mental health impact will be. We don’t have to experience these events directly for them to affect us. Simply hearing about them can have an emotional impact, and this can have negative repercussions for our mental and physical health.” The results of this survey come in advance of the findings of APA’s annual Stress in America™ survey, which will be released this fall. To better understand the impact of mass shootings on stress and health in the aftermath of the recent tragic El Paso and Dayton shootings, APA commissioned the nationally representative survey. It was conducted online by The Harris Poll between Aug. 8 and 12 among 2,017 adults ages 18 and older who reside in the U.S.  This survey was conducted online within the United States between Aug. 8 and 12, 2019, among 2,017 U.S. adults (ages 18 and older) by The Harris Poll on behalf of the American Psychological Association via its Harris On Demand omnibus product. Figures for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, region and household income were weighted where necessary to bring them into line with their actual proportions in the population. Propensity score weighting was used to adjust for respondents’ propensity to be online. When asked which places they are stressed about the possibility of a mass shooting occurring, adults most commonly say a public event (53%), mall (50%), school or university (42%) or movie theater (38%), with only one in five (21%) saying they never experience stress as a result of the possibility of a mass shooting. Respondents for this survey were selected from among those who have agreed to participate in our surveys. The data have been weighted to reflect the composition of the adult population. Because the sample is based on those who agreed to participate in the online panel, no estimates of theoretical sampling error can be calculated.  “Mass shootings are a public health issue, and we need to take a comprehensive public health approach to understand and devise lasting policy solutions,” Evans said. “It is important that people and policymakers realize that this is not an insurmountable issue; it is something we have the power to change.”  last_img read more

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Movie Review: Judy

first_img RelatedMovie Review – HarrietBy David Lee Zamora  Special to the Parade   Harriet is a thrilling and exciting film filled with powerful acting that tells the story of Harriet Tubman (Cynthia Erivo) and her journey from slave to one of America’s greatest abolitionists. The film starts by showing Harriet dealing with her struggles…December 13, 2019In “News”‘Craft’ second film in Foreign Film FestivalAt 7 p.m. Tuesday, January 22, hard on the heels of a stunning political satire from Argentina, the Laguna Madre Foreign Film Festival now brings a highly engaging show, this time from Brazil. Riscado, with the English title of Craft, takes a close look at the trials and tribulations of…January 10, 2013In “South Padre Parade”Movie Review: Where’d You Go, BernadetteBy DAVID LEE ZAMORA Special to the Parade Where’d You Go, Bernadette, based on the novel by Maria Semple, follows Bernadette Fox (Cate Blanchett), a famed architect turned stay-at-home mother who finds any human interaction with anybody outside of her family challenging and stressful. All this builds up on the…August 30, 2019In “News” Share By David Lee ZamoraSpecial to the ParadeJudy is a way better Bohemian Rhapsody, a movie that truly makes you feel for Judy Garland (Renee Zellweger) and her struggles to make money and to take back custody of her children from her ex-husband. Garland played Dorothy in the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz and was a singer and dancer. The pressures and environment of early stardom plagued Garland with alcohol and substance abuse and insomnia. Film executives told her she was unattractive and forced her work countless hours without sleep or food.Just to clarify, I’m not saying Bohemian Rhapsody was bad, but that it missed its mark by just focusing on Freddy Mercury and his life while leaving the rest of Queen in the background. Judy, on the other hand, intentionally focuses on one person, and that’s Judy Garland, and because of this singular-focus, the film emphasizes the horrible struggles Garland went through as a child, like film studio staff giving her appetite-suppressing amphetamines in fear of her gaining weight for The Wizard of Oz shoots.This film leaves no doubt that her teen years were hell, and that’s shown through flashbacks throughout the film.One of the great things about this film is the performance of Renee Zellweger. She truly does wear her emotions on her sleeves, making you feel  her fear when she realises that shes going to perform on stage in front of hundreds of people again, or her sadness when she brings up her kids. It’s not just Zellweger: everyone else is great too. Finn Wittrock, who plays Garland’s new husband, Mickey Deans, comes off as a charming man who’s genuinely interested in Garland, but there’s something off about him that’s shown later on. His character is one of my favorites in the film; favorite in the fact that I love to hate him.I had no problem with this film. If I had to think of one, I couldn’t. Well, maybe one little thing: when Garland’s coworkers take her out for a surprise goodbye cake, they all say it looks delicious, but in my opinion, it just looks disgusting. Like a creamy mess of a cake. Yeah, that’s my only problem with the film. Regardless of the cake, the happy ending is good: it makes a good send off to her flawed-but-good, kind-hearted character. This film is a typical musician biopic that tells you about the subject, with a bit of made-up stuff to add to the film. It’s very reminiscent of the film Selena or La Bamba, and if you enjoy these films for their stories and music, then you should try Judy.last_img read more

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