Tribal Indian designs in modern format at London Fashion Week

first_img(With Pix) New Delhi, Sep 16 (PTI) Designer Yana Ngoba has teamed up with fabric designer, Nabam Aka to bring to life the loin loom – one of the oldest looms in the world, handwoven by weavers in Arunachal Pradesh at the upcoming London Fashion Week. For Ngoba, the show said to be her first globally heralds a big opportunity and the start of a new journey, which offers a platform to bring fashion from Indias north east on an international stage. “Theres a huge following of boho and gypsy trends in the UK and I plan on capitalising on the same. Its a great platform to bring north eastern tribal accessories, fabric and fine artmanship to the UK market and to the world,” Ngoba told PTI in an email interview. Ngoba is part of the London Fashion Weeks off-schedule shows Fashions Finest and is set to showcase her collection on September 19 at The Grand Connaught Rooms in London. The designer who retails under her label Yana in Style aims to carry forward the legacy passed on by the forefathers in the North East and hopes to bring to the fore heritage handlooms, woven fabrics and handmade jewellery made of bronze, brass, stones and broken bones. Fusing rich traditions with contemporary elements is what defines Ngobas distinctive style. The loin loom, says Ngoba is a heritage fabric whose making has been passed down over generations of weavers. Ngoba with Nabam Aka have worked in the North-East states to uplift traditional weavers and introduce new and safe weaving looms. The colored fabrics have been dyed using the traditional method of Indigo dyeing and also with other vegetable colors. “Nabam is a revered designer from Arunachal Pradesh. She has employed a number of weavers in Itanagar. I have always promoted North East artmanship. Nabam and I were working on loin loom in our respective spaces and thats when we decided to collaborate,” says Ngoba. Since their show is being sponsored by Arunachal Pradesh government, they wanted to present a collection that speaks completely of the fashion in the North East ? clothes and accessories. Hen feathers, agate, bamboo, cane, yarn, silver, brass and jute have been used for the accessories. For Ngoba the aim is to elevate the ethnic accessories and the fabric from loin loom into modern, stylish boho and gypsy international fashion wear. MORE PTI ANS ANSadvertisementlast_img read more

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Share and Share Alike

first_imgI’ve been hearing a lot of talk from freelancers the past few months about the “sharing economy” (some call it the “peer economy”). I’m among the first to say that I like the companies that have come up so far.Airbnb? Huge fan. Kickstarter? Power to ‘em. Gumroad? Tons of our members use it. Zipcar? Loved the concept, although I don’t love how they were bought by Avis.We need to build a strong social sector based on models like cooperatives, where members have ownership and profits are shared. These companies built a brilliant infrastructure to allow large-scale networking and collaboration and are asking essential questions of our society.But there’s a limit to how much actual sharing is going on here.Most of the pioneers of the peer economy are backed by venture capital firms who’ve spent millions building these platforms, and they expect to earn millions in return. And that’s fine, but let’s be clear that most of the fruits of those rewards are being shared among a small group of investors and company owners.The members of these peer communities—the people whose thousands of individual transactions make the networks successful in the first place—aren’t really sharing in the wealth they’re generating. To wit: Zipcar was acquired in January for $500 million, but its members, who made that valuation possible, didn’t get a share of that.These venture-backed peer economy superstars are just one part—an incredibly important part—of a larger economic ecosystem that’s still in its early stages.We also need to build a strong social sector based on models like cooperatives, where members have ownership and profits are shared.We can use the infrastructure created by the peer economy to create social-purpose institutions, nonprofits, community-development organizations, a new labor movement and other collaborative networks.The thing about an ecosystem is that all of its elements are interdependent, nourishing each other. In this new economic ecosystem, we’re already seeing social sector enterprises coming up, learning from the successes of their for-profit peers.There’s a non-profit side of the peer economy, like community network Shareable and lending/bartering sites like Freecycle and others.Sustainable for-profit businesses play another role. They can range from community-classifieds Craigslist (a pioneer in its own right), to local co-working spaces to social-purpose companies like Freelancers Insurance Company.Corporate certification programs are also helping to build this new economic ecosystem, like Fair Trade, LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) and Certified B Corps, which have agreed to certain environmentally- and socially-conscious business practices.Then there’s my personal favorite, the cooperative movement. From the National Cooperative Business Association, to insurance coops like Nationwide, to agricultural cooperatives like Cabot Creamery, Sunkist, and Land O’ Lakes, these guys will have a crucial role in the new economy.In the new economy, all of these sectors are connected—in other words, we’re all swimming together, and I think we’re looking for similar things. There’s a lot more sharing ahead.What’s the sharing economy like in your community? Please let me know in the comments or on Twitter at @Sara_Horowitz.last_img read more

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