St. Anne’s Infant School is National Children’s Action Day Project

first_imgSt. Anne’s Infant School is National Children’s Action Day Project EducationApril 26, 2013 RelatedSeven Primary Schools in East Kingston Get Tablet Computers FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Young Jamaicans are being encouraged to do something for their communities through schools and youth groups on National Children’s Action Day, as part of activities to celebrate Child Month 2013, to be observed in May.The Day, being organised by the National Child Month Committee (NCMC), will be observed on Friday, May 10, and the main project is the St. Anne’s Infant School, 48 North Street, downtown, Kingston. Efforts will be made to repair its facilities, including the playground, bathrooms and surrounding areas.Each year, the NCMC selects a National Action Day Project for the main activity of the day.Speaking at a recent JIS ‘Think Tank’, Chairperson of the NCMC, Dr. Pauline Mullings, said the Day is an opportunity to “promote community spirit” and to help children understand that “whereas they do have rights, they also have responsibilities”.“We are asking all adults to ensure that the children from your church, school clubs and communities are involved in doing beautification programmes,” she said, adding that some children can be involved in projects such as the planting of trees or painting of pedestrian crossings. She emphasized that children must be guided by an adult before embarking on a job. Another main event during Child Month is National Children’s Day to be celebrated on Friday, May 17. Last year, Governor-General, His Excellency the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen, proclaimed the third Friday of May each year as National Children’s Day.“This is the day when every child on the street, in your personal care, and in the school must be treated the same way as we treat Mother’s Day and Father’s Day,” Dr. Mullings said.She is encouraging all Jamaicans to wear something yellow on that Day to reflect the sunshine of children. Motorists are also being asked to keep their headlamps on to show that “we do love, care, recognise, honour and celebrate our children,” Dr. Mullings said.Child Month was first celebrated in May, 1953, under the patronage of Lady Foote, wife of the then Governor.By E. Hartman Reckord, JIS Reporter RelatedSt. Anne’s Infant School is National Children’s Action Day Projectcenter_img RelatedSt. Anne’s Infant School is National Children’s Action Day Project Advertisementslast_img read more

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San Mig eyes 3-2 edge in PBA’s Game 5

first_img“Hinahanapako ng mga teammates ko.Kahit nagmimintis ako, pero hinahanap pa rin nila ako,” the Cebuano big mansaid. “Binibigyan nila ako ng kumpiyansa,kaya kailangan suklian ko ‘yung tiwala nila.”/PN “(In Game 4) June Mar was able to playcomfortably inside and that’s what we need from him,” said Austria. “Theplayers understand what made us a great team in the past few years.” Beermen head coach Leo Austria said he plansto utilize the 6-foot-11 frame of Fajardo once again for a 3-2 series edge. Fajardo feasted on KaTropa’s undersizedfrontline in their 106-101 Game 4 victory Sunday evening. He finished the matchwith 22 points and seven rebounds to back up import Chris McCullough onoffense. The five-time PBA MVP awardee, Fajardo feltgrateful that the Beermen kept their faith on him despite the struggles he wentthrough in the first few games of the finals series. San Miguel Beermen’s June Mar Fajardo evades the defense of TNT KaTropa’s Jeth Troy Rosario for an easy inside basket in Game 4 of the 2019 Honda PBA Commissioner’s Cup finals on Sunday. PBA PHOTO “Yung key basket niya is what we’re looking from him since five years ago becausethat’s his advantage,” he added. “I’m thankful his teammates understand him dahil we won seven championships withhim as the priority in the shaded area.” MANILA – San Miguel Beermen looks to rely onJune Mar Fajardo’s height s it aims for a series lead in Game 5 of the 2019Honda PBA Commissioner’s Cup finals tonight against TNT KaTropa at the SmartAraneta Coliseum. The match starts at 7 p.m.last_img read more

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Tickets sold out for Leeds United clash

first_imgAs a result, it will be the largest crowd in BS3 of the season so far.However, tickets remain on general sale for City’s next home fixture on Tuesday night, under the lights against Ipswich Town (March 12th, 7.45pm KO).Jamie Paterson and Famara Diédhiou struck off the back of an own goal to fire City into a 3-2 win against the Tractor Boys at Portman Road back in November, which kickstarted an incredible unbeaten run.This will be the last fixture at Ashton Gate until Saturday, April 6th.City v Ipswich Town is a silver category match, with tickets now on general sale and available to Forever Bristol Members.Secure your seatlast_img read more

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HOF 2016: Greene follows unique, loud path to Hall of Fame

first_img“I figured out how to pass rush,” Greene said. “I figured out how to put a guy, an offensive tackle three to four inches taller, 80 pounds heavier, put him in a position of failure, and I did that.”Over and over again.Perhaps the most startling aspects of Greene’s time with the Rams, Steelers, 49ers and Panthers were his durability and productivity. He missed just a dozen games at a position where longevity is fleeting. Ten times he finished with at least 10 sacks, including 12 with Carolina in his final season in 1999 at age 37.“Kevin to me represents all the things you want in a Hall of Famer: great work ethic, passion and love for the game, great consistency,” said longtime NFL coach Dom Capers, who will present Greene for induction. “He brought that energy and enthusiasm into the locker room every Sunday.”It occasionally bubbled over, but that energy is what set Greene apart. There were days while Capers was coaching the Panthers — where Greene served as both outside linebacker and coach-in-training — when Capers would wring his hands over how to set the proper emotional tone. Turns out, he needn’t have bothered.“You always worried if you have the right things to say before a game,” Capers said. “But I never had to worry about that because Kevin would have that locker room so wired up before we took the field.”Call it the byproduct of a fervent devotion that extended far beyond mere X’s and O’s. Teammates were “brothers.” The players he led while spending five seasons as a linebackers coach in Green Bay from 2009-13 were his “boys.”“The way he approached the game is the way he approached life,” said Packers linebacker Clay Matthews. “It might rub some people the wrong way as far as how he went about his business. But at the same time, he coached us for truly the love of the game. It wasn’t about the money. It wasn’t about the fame.”That doesn’t mean Greene was averse to chasing glory. He played eight seasons for the Rams, playing with a brazen style that seemed like a perfect fit in glitzy Los Angeles. Yet one season under taciturn Chuck Knox in 1992 left him cold. He planned an expansive tour when he hit free agency in the spring of 1993. It didn’t last long. One trip through the Fort Pitt tunnel — with downtown Pittsburgh exploding into view as he crossed the confluence of the Monongahela, Allegheny and Ohio rivers — and a brief chat with Steelers coach Bill Cowher did the trick.“I knew 15 minutes talking to coach Cowher, I’d found my home,” Greene said.Serving as a tag-team partner with fellow outside linebacker Greg Lloyd, Greene led a revival of the “Steel Curtain” defense that propelled Pittsburgh to three straight playoff berths and a spot in the 1996 Super Bowl.While the ultimate prize never materialized and he left for Carolina after the season, there’s little doubt where Greene considers his true NFL home. Greene will receive his Hall of Fame ring during a halftime ceremony at Heinz Field on Oct. 2 when the Steelers host Kansas City.“I really bleed black and gold,” he said. “That really was the pinnacle of my career. We just crushed people. We had the right attitudes on defense.”One that began with Greene and Lloyd and cascaded down the roster.“His intensity, his leadership, his productivity on the field, was Hall-of-Fame quality,” said former Steelers safety turned coach Carnell Lake. “From classroom work to offseason conditioning, he’s what you wanted in a teammate.”And in a coach too. Matthews credits Greene for turning him into a perennial Pro Bowler with the Packers, one whose football life closely mirrors that of his mentor. A former college walk-on like Greene, Matthews found a kindred spirit when he arrived in Green Bay in 2009.“I felt like we really kind of hit it off just being guys who were looked down upon and not expecting much,” Matthews said. “I think ultimately, he wanted to go out there and prove not only did he belong, but he was the best at doing it.”And if you didn’t like the way — or the volume — with which he did it, that was your problem.___AP Sports Writer Genaro Armas in Green Bay, Wisconsin contributed to this report.___AP NFL website: www.pro32.ap.org and www.twitter.com/AP_NFL The showman in Kevin Greene sometimes overshadowed the football player. Not that the outside linebacker who spent 15 seasons posing over fallen quarterbacks seemed to care.There was the preening after most of his 160 career sacks, third most in NFL history. The side gig in professional wrestling. The unmistakable untamed blonde hair. The mouth that didn’t seem to have an off switch, be it on the field, in the locker room or in life.The image Greene carefully cultivated as a hell raiser for four teams from 1985-99 belied the ardent student underneath. How else to explain how a former walk-on at Auburn molded himself into a 6-foot-3, 247-pound force of nature, one that now finds himself in the rarest company of all: the Hall of Fame?“I wasn’t the biggest (and) I wasn’t fastest,” Greene said. “But as long as you have a motor, you have heart … that will overcome any physical limitations.” Outsmarting opponents helps. For all of Greene’s considerable charisma, the most important moments of his career often came in silent film sessions far away from the cameras as he searched for weaknesses to exploit. “I figured out how to pass rush,” Greene said. “I figured out how to put a guy, an offensive tackle three to four inches taller, 80 pounds heavier, put him in a position of failure, and I did that.”Over and over again.Perhaps the most startling aspects of Greene’s time with the Rams, Steelers, 49ers and Panthers were his durability and productivity. He missed just a dozen games at a position where longevity is fleeting. Ten times he finished with at least 10 sacks, including 12 with Carolina in his final season in 1999 at age 37.“Kevin to me represents all the things you want in a Hall of Famer: great work ethic, passion and love for the game, great consistency,” said longtime NFL coach Dom Capers, who will present Greene for induction. “He brought that energy and enthusiasm into the locker room every Sunday.”It occasionally bubbled over, but that energy is what set Greene apart. There were days while Capers was coaching the Panthers — where Greene served as both outside linebacker and coach-in-training — when Capers would wring his hands over how to set the proper emotional tone. Turns out, he needn’t have bothered.“You always worried if you have the right things to say before a game,” Capers said. “But I never had to worry about that because Kevin would have that locker room so wired up before we took the field.”Call it the byproduct of a fervent devotion that extended far beyond mere X’s and O’s. Teammates were “brothers.” The players he led while spending five seasons as a linebackers coach in Green Bay from 2009-13 were his “boys.”“The way he approached the game is the way he approached life,” said Packers linebacker Clay Matthews. “It might rub some people the wrong way as far as how he went about his business. But at the same time, he coached us for truly the love of the game. It wasn’t about the money. It wasn’t about the fame.”That doesn’t mean Greene was averse to chasing glory. He played eight seasons for the Rams, playing with a brazen style that seemed like a perfect fit in glitzy Los Angeles. Yet one season under taciturn Chuck Knox in 1992 left him cold. He planned an expansive tour when he hit free agency in the spring of 1993. It didn’t last long. One trip through the Fort Pitt tunnel — with downtown Pittsburgh exploding into view as he crossed the confluence of the Monongahela, Allegheny and Ohio rivers — and a brief chat with Steelers coach Bill Cowher did the trick.“I knew 15 minutes talking to coach Cowher, I’d found my home,” Greene said.Serving as a tag-team partner with fellow outside linebacker Greg Lloyd, Greene led a revival of the “Steel Curtain” defense that propelled Pittsburgh to three straight playoff berths and a spot in the 1996 Super Bowl.While the ultimate prize never materialized and he left for Carolina after the season, there’s little doubt where Greene considers his true NFL home. Greene will receive his Hall of Fame ring during a halftime ceremony at Heinz Field on Oct. 2 when the Steelers host Kansas City.“I really bleed black and gold,” he said. “That really was the pinnacle of my career. We just crushed people. We had the right attitudes on defense.”One that began with Greene and Lloyd and cascaded down the roster.“His intensity, his leadership, his productivity on the field, was Hall-of-Fame quality,” said former Steelers safety turned coach Carnell Lake. “From classroom work to offseason conditioning, he’s what you wanted in a teammate.”And in a coach too. Matthews credits Greene for turning him into a perennial Pro Bowler with the Packers, one whose football life closely mirrors that of his mentor. A former college walk-on like Greene, Matthews found a kindred spirit when he arrived in Green Bay in 2009.“I felt like we really kind of hit it off just being guys who were looked down upon and not expecting much,” Matthews said. “I think ultimately, he wanted to go out there and prove not only did he belong, but he was the best at doing it.”And if you didn’t like the way — or the volume — with which he did it, that was your problem.___AP Sports Writer Genaro Armas in Green Bay, Wisconsin contributed to this report.___AP NFL website: www.pro32.ap.org and www.twitter.com/AP_NFL,The showman in Kevin Greene sometimes overshadowed the football player. Not that the outside linebacker who spent 15 seasons posing over fallen quarterbacks seemed to care.There was the preening after most of his 160 career sacks, third most in NFL history. The side gig in professional wrestling. The unmistakable untamed blonde hair. The mouth that didn’t seem to have an off switch, be it on the field, in the locker room or in life.The image Greene carefully cultivated as a hell raiser for four teams from 1985-99 belied the ardent student underneath. How else to explain how a former walk-on at Auburn molded himself into a 6-foot-3, 247-pound force of nature, one that now finds himself in the rarest company of all: the Hall of Fame?“I wasn’t the biggest (and) I wasn’t fastest,” Greene said. “But as long as you have a motor, you have heart … that will overcome any physical limitations.”center_img Outsmarting opponents helps. For all of Greene’s considerable charisma, the most important moments of his career often came in silent film sessions far away from the cameras as he searched for weaknesses to exploit. In this Jan. 28, 1996, file photo, Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker Kevin Greene gives a thumbs up in Sun Devil Stadium before taking on the Dallas Cowboys in Super Bowl XXX in Tempe, Ariz.  (AP Photo/Hans Deryk, File)last_img read more

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Hamilton makes NASCAR history as first Black race director

first_imgFONTANA, Calif. (AP) — Jusan Hamilton grew up working on cars in his grandfather’s garage, and he has been in love with motorsports ever since.He dreamed of driving all the way from upstate New York’s dirt tracks to the bright lights of NASCAR. When it didn’t work out behind the wheel, he poured himself into a career behind the scenes of racing.Hamilton hit a milestone Saturday when he debuted as a NASCAR race director for the Xfinity Series event at Fontana. He is the first Black race director in NASCAR history, and his co-workers say the 26-year-old can go any direction he chooses in the sport he loves.“I think this sport is open to everyone,” Hamilton said. “Like myself, if you find a passion in this sport and it’s something you enjoy, I think there’s an opportunity for everyone to come into the sport.”Hamilton likens a race director to a quarterback. Wearing a headset in the control tower high above Auto Club Speedway, Hamilton communicates with track and race officials while overseeing everything that occurs in the race, including penalties, crashes and cleanups.Hamilton has to make quick decisions involving safety personnel and even emergency services, and he had plenty to do in an eventful Xfinity race that featured several yellow flags and plenty of car damage.Just three weeks after getting married to his college sweetheart, Hamilton ran his first race without a significant hitch.After getting extensive experience in other areas of NASCAR’s operation, Hamilton has been preparing for this new role for several months. He oversaw the practice sessions at Fontana earlier in the week before his first chance to run the show in a real race.“Having a really good understanding of racing coming in has definitely benefited me,” Hamilton said. “I’ve been observing, and I’ve been on the radio for a while now.”Hamilton became a multisport athlete who participated in track and field at Ithaca College, even while he dreamed of driving like Kevin Harvick and Bobby Labonte. Hamilton applied to NASCAR’s Drive for Diversity training program, which helps minority drivers — but he wasn’t accepted.He still did three internships in various aspects of sports before landing a full-time job with NASCAR four years ago. Jim Cassidy, NASCAR’s senior vice president of racing operations, has played a significant role in Hamilton’s extensive experience across several departments.“He’s younger, but he’s curious, and he probably knows as much as I do from a race procedure standpoint, having been a driver,” Cassidy said. “There are some instances where I’m going to learn from him. … I want those working close with me to know everything I know, and I think that helps our relationship quite a bit, because he’s a sponge. It’s a pleasure to work with him. A pleasure to see where he’s come from, and where he could go.”NASCAR has made extensive efforts to expand its fan base and internal structure beyond the white, Southern stereotype commonly imposed on the sport, although CEO Brian France’s endorsement of Donald Trump last year undid some of that work.The governing body has established internships, outreach programs and even more specialized ideas, such as a program to welcome minority athletes for training to work on pit crews. Hamilton oversaw that pit crew program along with his new competition responsibilities.Hamilton realized he wasn’t racing with many other minorities during his youth in New York, but he didn’t perceive any obstacles because of it.“I don’t really think race comes into play at all when it comes to who ends up in the sport,” Hamilton said. “It’s just a matter of the knowledge of the sport, and some people don’t get that opportunity to learn about the sport at a young age like I did. So if you have that family member who has that connection and can share that with you, or if you develop it on your own, I think there’s a path for everyone.”Except for an occasional stint in an iRacing simulator, Hamilton doesn’t have much time to get behind the wheel. He’s too busy driving his own career forward.“I want to continue to be a successful race director, and I’d like to stay with the company somewhere on the competition side,” Hamilton said. “Anything that allows me to positively influence the sport, that would be my goal.”___More AP auto racing: www.racing.ap.org,FONTANA, Calif. (AP) — Jusan Hamilton grew up working on cars in his grandfather’s garage, and he has been in love with motorsports ever since.He dreamed of driving all the way from upstate New York’s dirt tracks to the bright lights of NASCAR. When it didn’t work out behind the wheel, he poured himself into a career behind the scenes of racing.Hamilton hit a milestone Saturday when he debuted as a NASCAR race director for the Xfinity Series event at Fontana. He is the first Black race director in NASCAR history, and his co-workers say the 26-year-old can go any direction he chooses in the sport he loves.“I think this sport is open to everyone,” Hamilton said. “Like myself, if you find a passion in this sport and it’s something you enjoy, I think there’s an opportunity for everyone to come into the sport.”Hamilton likens a race director to a quarterback. Wearing a headset in the control tower high above Auto Club Speedway, Hamilton communicates with track and race officials while overseeing everything that occurs in the race, including penalties, crashes and cleanups.Hamilton has to make quick decisions involving safety personnel and even emergency services, and he had plenty to do in an eventful Xfinity race that featured several yellow flags and plenty of car damage.Just three weeks after getting married to his college sweetheart, Hamilton ran his first race without a significant hitch.After getting extensive experience in other areas of NASCAR’s operation, Hamilton has been preparing for this new role for several months. He oversaw the practice sessions at Fontana earlier in the week before his first chance to run the show in a real race.“Having a really good understanding of racing coming in has definitely benefited me,” Hamilton said. “I’ve been observing, and I’ve been on the radio for a while now.”Hamilton became a multisport athlete who participated in track and field at Ithaca College, even while he dreamed of driving like Kevin Harvick and Bobby Labonte. Hamilton applied to NASCAR’s Drive for Diversity training program, which helps minority drivers — but he wasn’t accepted.He still did three internships in various aspects of sports before landing a full-time job with NASCAR four years ago. Jim Cassidy, NASCAR’s senior vice president of racing operations, has played a significant role in Hamilton’s extensive experience across several departments.“He’s younger, but he’s curious, and he probably knows as much as I do from a race procedure standpoint, having been a driver,” Cassidy said. “There are some instances where I’m going to learn from him. … I want those working close with me to know everything I know, and I think that helps our relationship quite a bit, because he’s a sponge. It’s a pleasure to work with him. A pleasure to see where he’s come from, and where he could go.”NASCAR has made extensive efforts to expand its fan base and internal structure beyond the white, Southern stereotype commonly imposed on the sport, although CEO Brian France’s endorsement of Donald Trump last year undid some of that work.The governing body has established internships, outreach programs and even more specialized ideas, such as a program to welcome minority athletes for training to work on pit crews. Hamilton oversaw that pit crew program along with his new competition responsibilities.Hamilton realized he wasn’t racing with many other minorities during his youth in New York, but he didn’t perceive any obstacles because of it.“I don’t really think race comes into play at all when it comes to who ends up in the sport,” Hamilton said. “It’s just a matter of the knowledge of the sport, and some people don’t get that opportunity to learn about the sport at a young age like I did. So if you have that family member who has that connection and can share that with you, or if you develop it on your own, I think there’s a path for everyone.”Except for an occasional stint in an iRacing simulator, Hamilton doesn’t have much time to get behind the wheel. He’s too busy driving his own career forward.“I want to continue to be a successful race director, and I’d like to stay with the company somewhere on the competition side,” Hamilton said. “Anything that allows me to positively influence the sport, that would be my goal.”___More AP auto racing: www.racing.ap.org Jusan Hamilton stands on the track after the NASCAR Xfinity auto race at the Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, Calif., Saturday, March 25, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)last_img read more

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So far, so good for Xavi Hernandez with Al-Sadd in Qatar

first_img 07/09/2015 Xavi is the player with the most appearances in the history of FC Barcelona, spread over 16 seasons in the first team, and he left with a good relationship with the fans. Barça hope to continue to be as successful in the post-Xavi era, led by the Neymar-Suarez-Messi trident. Upd. on 22/11/2016 at 03:06 CET Sport EN Xavi Hernandez is enjoying his new life after signing for Al-Sadd in Qatar. The former Barcelona player said in a press conference that he is “happy. We have a great team and a great manager. We want to win a lot of titles.”  His official debut for his new club will be on September 11 when the league begins.  In the press conference, Xavi continued: “I have a ton of titles, with Spain and with Barça, but I always want to win more. And not just the local championship, we also want to be fighting for the Asian Champions League. We have the ingredients to win it.” last_img read more

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Sex page rip out order defended

first_imgBy ANEEKA SIMONIS AND ALANA MITCHELSON ST Francis Xavier College’s Berwick campus principal has defended controversial orders handed down to…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

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Leafs shock Nitehawks again, up 2-0 in Murdoch Final

first_imgWho’d of thunk two games into the Murdoch Division Final, on home ice, no less, the Beaver Valley Nitehawks would have not scored a single goal.The Nelson Leafs did the unthinkable entering the best-of-seven Kootenay International Junior Hockey League Divisional Final, holding the offensive-minded Hawks scoreless in a 5-0 playoff victory Tuesday night at the Fruitvale Arena.The win, coupled with a 6-0 shellacking Monday in Game one of the series, gives Nelson a commanding 2-0 lead. The series now shifts back to the NDCC Arena for Games three and four, Thursday and Friday. Tuesday, the Leafs had the powerplay clicking on all cylinders, going 3-for-9 with the man advantage. Rookie Joe Davidson scored the first of three with the man advantage six minutes into the game to give the visiting team an early 1-0 lead.Aiden Jenner, with his first of two on the night, made it 2-0 three minutes later before KI playoff scoring leader Shawn Campbell added another powerplay goal to increase Nelson’s advantage.Leading 3-0, the Leafs turned the game over to Anderson Violette who stopped all 27 shots in the final 40 minutes to register his second shutout of the series.Jenner, in the second, and Keenan Crossman, with the man advantage, completed the scoring for a Nelson team that has not allowed a goal in more than 180 minutes dating back to the Spokane series.Nelson outshot Hawks 36-32 in the contest. Hunter Young was in goal for Beaver Valley.PLAYOFF NOTES: The Leafs, outscoring their opponents 30-7, are getting it done at both ends of the ice in the KIJHL Playoffs. Nelson has four players, including league leading Shawn Campbell with 12 points, in the top five playoff scorers while goalie Anderson Violette is currently second in goalie stats with a sizzling 1.40 goals against average. Brock Palmer of Kimberley is second behind Campbell in playoff scoring with 10 points with Leafs Aiden Jenner, Reid Wilson and David Sanchez at three, four and five spots, respectively. . . . Wilson currently is riding a six-game point streak in the playoffs. . . . Kimberley took a 2-0 lead in the Eddie Mountain Final with a 3-0 win Tuesday in the Bavarian City. . . . In the Okanagan Conference, both series are tied 1-1 after 100 Mile House up against defending KI Champion Revelstoke, and Kelowna at home against Princeton, won, 3-2 and 2-1, respectively.last_img read more

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Galway heroes of 1987 to be honoured at GPA Former Players Event in September

first_imgThe annual GPA Former Players Reunion Lunch will take place on September 16 2017, on the eve of the All Ireland Football Final, and at this year’s event they will recognise the achievements of 10 teams, hurling and football All-Ireland winners through the decades from 1967-2007. Speaking ahead of the event, GPA CEO Dermot Earley said: “The GPA Former Players Event is always a special date in our calendar and this year will be no different as we honour Eddie Keher and Brian McEniff with Lifetime Achievement awards for their brilliant careers.“We also congratulate all 10 All-Ireland-winning teams and the GPA invites all players from those squads to celebrate your success on the pitch together as we recognise the immense contribution that all of our former players have made to our games. A lot may have changed, but your place still remains.”print WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Email This includes the Galway team of 1987 and the GPA would like to extend an invite to all players who were involved with either squad as we celebrate their on-field achievements for the Tribesmen while honouring many of the game’s greats.The GPA hopes to raise awareness of the event amongst both squads to ensure that each player is honoured accordingly.While they are honouring those 10 teams, they also invite all former inter-county footballers and hurlers to be present and enjoy the event.There will be approximately 500 former players with some special guests in attendance at the event and as well as honouring some of the GAA’s finest, the ambition is to grow this event, expand our ‘Alumni’ of former players and enhance the level of support they can provide to former players if and when needed.All profits from this event will go directly to the GPA Former Players Benevolent Fund.Each year, they also recognise one former hurler and one former footballer for Lifetime Achievement awards for their outstanding contribution to both codes. This year the hurling award recipient is Kilkenny’s Eddie Keher while Donegal’s Brian McEniff takes the football award.last_img read more

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Leafs rock Nitehawks in Murdoch Final opener

first_imgNelson finished the game outshooting Beaver Valley 35-29. The Leafs were 1-for-9 on the power play while the Hawks went scoreless.Nelson pitched a shutout for the second consecutive game in the playoffs. Tenzin Mint stopped all shots last week as the Leafs shutout Spokane Braves 3-0 to clinch the Murdoch Division Semi-Final Series in the Lilac City.Kootenay Ice to the rescueNelson was missing defenceman Ryan Quinn Nielsen-Webb for Game one of the series against Beaver Valley. The Kelowna player is serving a suspension for a Game Misconduct in the final 10 minutes of Nelson’s Game four win over Spokane.Nelson called up Kootenay Ice affiliate player Dallas Maximick for the contest.Quinn Nielsen-Webb is eligible to play when the series shifts back to Nelson Thursday for Game three.Nitros, Grizzlies, Posse take 1-0 leads after opening night winsKimberley Dynamiters edged Columbia Valley Rockies 4-3 in overtime to take a 1-0 lead in the best-of-seven Eddie Mountain Division Final Monday in the Bavarian City.Former Nelson Leaf Ryan Piva scored an unassisted marker at 7:17 of the first overtime period.Kimberley, trailing 3-2 in the third period, tied the game with one second remaining in the third period to force overtime. The Rockies outshot the Nitros 32-30 in the game. Game two is Tuesday in Kimberley.Meanwhile, in the Okanagan Conference Revelstoke Grizzlies and Princeton Posse each grabbed 1-0 leads in their respective Divisional Finals.Revelstoke shutout 100 Mile House Wranglers 3-0 while Princeton upset Kelowna 2-1. Each series resumes Tuesday. The Nelson Leafs made a strong statement during Game one of the Murdoch Division Finals.The Green and White blasted the Beaver Valley Nitehawks 6-0 to take a one game lead in the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League Playoff Series Monday night at the Fruitvale Arena.Shawn Campbell and Reid Wilson each scored twice and Leaf goalie Anderson Violette stopped all 29 shots to give Nelson a 1-0 lead in the best-of-seven Division Final.Game two is Tuesday night in Beaver Valley before the series shifts to the NDCC Arena for Games three and four, Thursday and Friday.It didn’t take long for Nelson to turn the tables on the hometown Hawks. Seconds after Brady Miller was sent to the penalty box for slashing, Campbell beat Hunter Young in the Beaver Valley nets to give the visitors the early lead less than three minutes into the game.Nelson’s leading scorer Reid Wilson added to the lead four minutes later before Brandon Costa made it 3-0 less than 12 minutes into the contest.Nelson scored three times in the second, Wilson, David Sanchez and Campbell — the final tally coming on the power play with only five seconds remaining in the period — to assume complete control of the game.In the third Nelson kept up the pressure on the deflated Hawks, as the defence only allowed six shots on Violette in the period.last_img read more

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