Liberty Versus Security To Be Debated At CU-Boulder Philosophy Camp For Teens

first_imgNote to Editors: Students will debate Friday, July 19, at 1 p.m. in room E155 of the Bruce Curtis Museum Collections Building, located near the intersection of Broadway and College Avenue on the CU-Boulder campus. High school students have converged this week at the University of Colorado at Boulder for a summer philosophy camp that examines the balance between personal freedom and state security. The Summer Philosophy Institute of Colorado, an outreach program of the CU-Boulder philosophy department, is hosting its seventh annual camp July 14-20. Classic and contemporary philosophical problems will be read and discussed by 15- to 17-year-old students from all over Colorado.The week will culminate in a Lincoln-vs.-Douglas-style debate on the priority of individual liberty or security within society on Friday, July 19, at 1 p.m. in room E155 of the Bruce Curtis Museum Collections Building on the CU-Boulder campus. “This is a very topical problem, especially since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks,” said Ryan Mott, a philosophy master’s degree candidate and co-director of the camp.The program’s goal is to bring philosophy to otherwise underrepresented groups in the CU-Boulder community, Director Sheralee Brindell said.”The idea is to bring critical thinking and philosophy skills to high school students,” Brindell said. “We’re particularly interested in exposing philosophy to kids from smaller communities in areas like the Western Slope, the eastern plains or the mountains.”Other sessions at this year’s camp, led by CU-Boulder philosophy professors and graduate students, include “The Problem of Evil,” “Punishment and Retributivism,” “Free Will vs. Determinism,” “Global Ethics,” and “Feminist Issues.” “It’s not your typical curriculum for high school students,” Mott said.Organizers were pleased to note the equal ratio of girls to boys at this year’s camp. “Philosophy is a field that is often considered to be male dominated,” Mott said. “The program has pretty much had a 50-50 split of male and female students in the past, too.” The students attend two or three class and debate sessions per day during the week. In the evenings, they will watch movies and will see a performance of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” at the Colorado Shakespeare Festival on the CU-Boulder campus.”I’m truly amazed by the group of kids who come to this camp,” Brindell said. “These are kids who are choosing to sit through six hours of philosophy discussion every day for a week of their summer vacation.” For more information visit the program Web site at http://www.colorado.edu/philosophy/outreach_spico.html Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: July 14, 2002 last_img read more

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St. Anne’s Infant School is National Children’s Action Day Project

first_imgSt. Anne’s Infant School is National Children’s Action Day Project EducationApril 26, 2013 RelatedSeven Primary Schools in East Kingston Get Tablet Computers FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Young Jamaicans are being encouraged to do something for their communities through schools and youth groups on National Children’s Action Day, as part of activities to celebrate Child Month 2013, to be observed in May.The Day, being organised by the National Child Month Committee (NCMC), will be observed on Friday, May 10, and the main project is the St. Anne’s Infant School, 48 North Street, downtown, Kingston. Efforts will be made to repair its facilities, including the playground, bathrooms and surrounding areas.Each year, the NCMC selects a National Action Day Project for the main activity of the day.Speaking at a recent JIS ‘Think Tank’, Chairperson of the NCMC, Dr. Pauline Mullings, said the Day is an opportunity to “promote community spirit” and to help children understand that “whereas they do have rights, they also have responsibilities”.“We are asking all adults to ensure that the children from your church, school clubs and communities are involved in doing beautification programmes,” she said, adding that some children can be involved in projects such as the planting of trees or painting of pedestrian crossings. She emphasized that children must be guided by an adult before embarking on a job. Another main event during Child Month is National Children’s Day to be celebrated on Friday, May 17. Last year, Governor-General, His Excellency the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen, proclaimed the third Friday of May each year as National Children’s Day.“This is the day when every child on the street, in your personal care, and in the school must be treated the same way as we treat Mother’s Day and Father’s Day,” Dr. Mullings said.She is encouraging all Jamaicans to wear something yellow on that Day to reflect the sunshine of children. Motorists are also being asked to keep their headlamps on to show that “we do love, care, recognise, honour and celebrate our children,” Dr. Mullings said.Child Month was first celebrated in May, 1953, under the patronage of Lady Foote, wife of the then Governor.By E. Hartman Reckord, JIS Reporter RelatedSt. Anne’s Infant School is National Children’s Action Day Projectcenter_img RelatedSt. Anne’s Infant School is National Children’s Action Day Project Advertisementslast_img read more

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Biden to extend foreclosure moratorium, mortgage forbearance

first_imgBiden’s announcement extends the foreclosure moratorium until June. (Getty) The Biden administration announced Tuesday that it would extend the nationwide foreclosure moratorium and mortgage forbearance through June.The move would prevent home foreclosures and allow for delayed mortgage payments. It would also offer six months of additional mortgage forbearance for those who enroll on or before June 30, Politico reported.Some 2.7 million homeowners with government-backed mortgages are enrolled in the mortgage forbearance program, which remains available to another 11 million owners.The actions would extend an order originally enacted by the Trump administration and expanded by the Biden administration on President Joe Biden’s first day in office.Read moreBiden’s $1.9T package would extend eviction ban, boost rent reliefBiden bans LGBT-based housing discriminationBiden to extend limits on evictions, foreclosures This content is for subscribers only.Subscribe Now Full Name* Email Address*center_img Message* The eviction and foreclosure moratoriums had been in place until March. The eviction ban was not mentioned in Tuesday’s announcement.The announcement by the White House increases pressure on Congress to pass Biden’s $1.9 trillion Covid-19 relief package. If passed in its entirety, the proposal would extend a national moratorium on evictions and foreclosures through Sept. 30.[Politico] — Sasha JonesContact Sasha Joneslast_img read more

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