Nova Scotia fixes online workaround of age requirement for cannabis sales

first_imgHALIFAX – Nova Scotia’s government-owned cannabis retailer said it has successfully taken measures to prevent people from skirting the access code required as part of age verification for online sales.The problem popped up hours after the use of cannabis became legal, when someone posted a 77-second online video offering instructions on how to get around using the required access cards.Beverley Ware, spokeswoman for the Nova Scotia Liquor Corporation, said late Thursday afternoon the Crown entity believes it has solved the issue.“It involved moving data stored in a browser to a server,” she said in an email.Earlier, Ware said the change the corporation made “means that you won’t be able to bypass the access code anymore.”She said Nova Scotia is one of two provinces that has a two-step age verification process that involves inputting an access code and then confirming the customer is at least 19 years old.In order to purchase cannabis products online in Nova Scotia, adults have to pick up an access code in person at the province’s liquor and cannabis stores, after showing proof of age. The access code is free and there is no personal information attached to it.Ware said there is an additional step to ensure cannabis is not being purchased by minors.“No matter how you place your order, when it’s shipped to the door the person who receives it still has to provide photo ID proving that they live at that address and proving that they are 19 years old,” Ware said.She said deliveries must be made person-to-person or the product will be shipped back to the corporation.When asked about whether it was possible to know if an adult was getting around the security measures for a minor, Ware raised the idea of social responsibility.“We would hope that Nova Scotians wouldn’t provide liquor to minors and cigarettes to those under age. There is a certain amount of responsibility here that if you are an adult purchasing cannabis we would hope that you don’t provide it to a minor, and it’s illegal to provide it to a minor.”But Nova Scotia’s Opposition Progressive Conservatives said the video was proof that the province’s Liberal government had “failed to keep the drug out of children’s hands.”“They have proven that in addition to not being able to trust them with our private information, we can’t trust them to protect our children,” interim Tory Leader Karla MacFarlane said in a news release.Meanwhile, the liquor corporation said it conducted 12,810 transactions province-wide during the first day of legalization Wednesday, resulting in $660,000 in total sales — with $47,000 of that coming from online sales.last_img read more

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CoOp Students Bring Innovation According to Ted Rogers Dean

center_img At the end of the four months, the ten-person collaboration came up with some innovative ideas that were both tangible and implementable. Their ideas were:A way to standardize fee-billing processes and enhance consistency, efficiency and revenue.A new enterprise-wide communication tool to enhance collaboration.A virtual reality augmented tool that would be used to help employees and clients assimilate complex data. Do you want your company to be more innovative? The key could be hiring more co-op students. At least, that’s what Steven Murphy, the Dean of the Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University, recently told the Globe and Mail. According to Murphy, co-op students help catalyze innovation in companies thanks to their “tech-savvy, resourceful, purpose-driven and unburdened” outlook.Murphy saw this innovation most recently during a collaboration between CIBC Mellow and the Ted Rogers School. The idea behind the collaboration was to partner five Ryerson students—from different backgrounds—with five CIBC Mellon employees for a period of four months. They met in the Business Innovation Hub and were given the mandate to identify and find solutions for challenges and opportunities that CIBC was facing.The key to the collaboration was diversity. The students had backgrounds in everything from business to technology management, accounting, finance, entrepreneurship and even environmental biology. While the CIBC employees also came from diverse areas including accountants, client relations, technical support and a business development proposal writer. To ensure success, there were three rules that the collaboration had to follow:True Partnership: The Ryerson students were given trust and credibility to complete each task at hand.Freedom to Fail: The ten Hub members were encouraged to experiment and potentially fail, if that’s what it took.No Boundaries: The team was encouraged to ask any and all questions, to request data, set up meetings, and do whatever it took to get the job done. “This new model of experiential learning is about so much more than simply letting students gain work experience,” Murphy wrote. “It’s about unleashing the energy and imagination the students embody, to drive innovation in the workplace and help solve the corporate leader’s conundrum of how to shift corporate culture and embrace innovation. Bit by bit, corporate culture is best challenged from within.”last_img read more

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