Comment / The search for a single set of standards to service today’s supply chains

first_img This the first part of a two-part article co-authored by a group of leading IT and innovation executives from the freight industry, stressing the need for more comprehensive data standards to service 21st century supply chains.The second part will be published tomorrow.End-to-end supply chains typically involve several modes of transport and a wide range of stakeholders. The original seller, as well as the final buyer of the product have little visibility of the location and condition of the product during the transportation phase(s). The original shipment from the seller is represented as a consignment under contract with each transport operator and may be identified using different identification methods. The shipment also may be consolidated with other non-related seller to buyer shipments in different ways, depending on the mode of transport.Various standards organisations focused on individual modes of transport have developed methodologies that have been adopted by their stakeholders in their supply chains. But in the larger picture, the ability to accommodate all modes of transport by a single set of standards has been elusive. By Hanane Becha, Todd Frazier, Rudy Hemeleers, Steen Erik Larsen, Bertrand Minary, Henk Mulder, André Simha, and Jaco Voorspuij 07/10/2020 Photo 93297972 © Leowolfert – Dreamstime.comcenter_img Some of the standards referenced have been developed and available for years but have not been universally adopted. Due to advances in technology and increased cost effectiveness, several international organisations are now developing key new standards for communication and interface technology implementation. Cooperation and adoption of international standards are the building blocks that will facilitate data visibility for intermodal transport communications and interoperability between the stakeholder platforms. Background and current stateWe are now in a transition from older standards adopted by individual transport modes to the current effort conducted by multiple international standards organisations to identify a normalised method of identification of required data that will be applicable to any seller to buyer shipment, regardless of the transport mode. Any authorised stakeholder to the transaction should be able to access the same data in near-real time.In order to enable end-to-end tracking and to enhance the collaborations between all stakeholders involved, there is a need for standards for intermodal transport and interoperability in the exchange of data across varying modes of transport platforms.Several standards organisations and initiatives are beginning to focus efforts on identifying and addressing the gaps and challenges for specific domains. The standards organisations for the most part tend to organise themselves by transport mode, eg, the International Road Transport Union (IRU), or the International Air Transport Association (IATA) with focus on road and air transport. Other organisations are concerned with the specifics of the transport mode,  eg, Digital Container Shipping Association (DCSA) concentrating on container-based transport, or a sub-segment of the supply chain.In the latter category, examples for marine shipping are Sea Traffic Management (STM), a concept programme that provides services to the maritime industry for improving connectivity, facilitating information exchange, and driving maritime efficiency, working in conjunction with the International Taskforce on Port Call Optimisation (ITPCO) to further benefit shipping companies.Nearly all of these focused standards groups are now addressing the need to cooperate and normalise their differences to close the gaps between transport modes. Such efforts have the power to facilitate more effective and transparent intermodal supply chains.Identifying common data requirementsThis article identifies some of the gaps and common requirements needed to enable effective end-to-end tracking across all modes of transport. The authors’ joint vision is to emphasise the need for international standards development, adoption and cooperation, working toward more normalised processes that will readily provide shipment data to all authorised stakeholders for both transport and trade in a near-real time manner.In the end-to-end transfer from a seller of goods to a buyer of the goods, the movement of the goods (termed ‘shipment’ in UN/CEFACT and GS1 terminology) may often be handled by many operators through several modes of transport in the supply chain. These shipments may be transported individually or be consolidated over the various movements of the end-to-end supply chain.The operators execute the individual stages of transport under various forms of contracts of carriage that cover a consignment[1]. There may be multiple consignments or contracts of carriage concurrently active during the transport phase, due to these consolidations that facilitate greater efficiency in the transport processes. This seller to buyer shipment approach has been modelled for multimodal transport by the United Nations Centre for Trade Facilitation and e-Business (UN/CEFACT) in the Buy-Ship-Pay (BSP) and Multi-Modal Transport (MMT) reference data models.Due to the usage of different standards for identification and tracking between the various transport modes, it is often difficult to transmit all the information regarded as pertinent to the varied stakeholders in an intermodal transaction. Visibility of the shipment may be lost to parties other than the current transport operator until arriving at the destination of that transport mode.Beneficial cargo owners (seller and buyer) would prefer to track their shipments preferably using their own shipment identifiers end-to-end. Operators in different modes of transport, however, when they are party to the same journey of a specific seller to buyer shipment, need to receive information about transport steps taken when changes in the mode of transport are planned or occur due to unexpected events.The European Interoperability Framework (EIF) [2] refers to two types of ‘interoperability’ that identify the data communication needs and the system requirements in order to effectively communicate between stakeholders:Semantic Interoperability – ensures that the precise format and meaning of exchanged data and information is preserved and understood throughout exchanges between parties, in other words ‘what is sent is what is understood’.Technical Interoperability – the ability for systems to communicate effectively and efficiently between platforms. This covers the applications and infrastructures linking systems and services. Aspects of technical interoperability include interface specifications, interconnection services, data integration services, data presentation and exchange, and secure communication protocols.Operational shipment identification – semantic interoperabilitySome concepts and identification schemes are now in development to enable more seamless end-to-end tracking and visibility.In order to locate the shipments seller to buyer end-to-end as they are transported to their final destinations, it is currently necessary to link a unique shipment ID with all the various consignment IDs used for consignments assigned during the transport of the shipment. The cargo carrier or operator has the burden of keeping track of the links between the shipment ID (assigned by the cargo owner – usually the seller) and possibly multiple consignment IDs currently. In many cases, the cargo owner has no direct relation with the actual carrier, which means the cargo owner has no way to make the link between his own shipment ID and the consignment ID used by the actual carrier. Clearly, in those cases, end-to-end tracking through multiple transport modes may not be possible.In general, the customer wants to be able to find out where the purchase is along the way, or trace the movement history, particularly in case of loss or damage. The identity of the type of transport and key locations captured during each operator’s movement of the goods may also be preferred or required.Carriers transport consignments and units (and also bulk commodities or liquids) in transport equipment (eg, intermodal containers or unit load devices [ULDs]) and on transport means (eg, maritime vessels, road trucks, aircraft, inland waterway barges, shortsea ships). To keep track of the transport units, it is imperative to know by which equipment and/or by which transport means they are carried. Only then, stakeholders will be able to use information related to the location of the transport means or transport equipment as reliable information about the location of the consignment, the shipment, the transport unit and ultimately the actual location of the goods.For example, the position of a maritime vessel (using automatic identification systems) or an airplane (using live plane tracker services) is known. Assuming a shipping line or airline accurately captured (and shared) the consignments that were loaded on board, the geoposition of the vessel is also the current location of the consignment.In container shipping, the shipping line generally knows exactly which containers (transport equipment) have been loaded and even where they are in the vessel. The same is true for an air carrier, which has control of where and when the containers are loaded on an aircraft. Therefore, it can be assumed with a great level of confidence where a specific container (and the cargo/shipments inside) is at any point in that transport stage.Identification of the goods may be limited to consolidated consignment IDs or shipment IDs. To know for sure what cargo/shipment/s are inside a container, it is necessary that the organisation that “stuffs” or “loads” the container accurately logs what is put into the container. The transport unit IDs may be recorded, if available, for the goods put into the container.Other modes of transport may record which transport units (pallets/ULDs) that were loaded onto the transport equipment (trucks, trailers, rail wagons or aircraft). In all those cases, knowing where the transport equipment is provides reliable information on the location of the transport units carried therein.Information captured during the transport movement may vary, dependent on the transport operation or even by mode of transport. However, this information may be important to making critical and timely decisions by primary stakeholders during or after transport of the shipment. Therefore, multimodal supply chains currently require to have unique IDs for:The shipment (master transport ID assigned by seller)The packages within a shipment (transport units)The transport contracts, consignment notes (like CMR)The transport means (like IMO vessel number)The transport equipment ID (like shipping container/ULD/rail car)The movement of the transport means (like flight for air cargo)The movement of the goods by a transport means (ie, manifest)All events and related data for each unique ID can be captured and cross-referenced for that particular operator and stakeholders of that mode of transport, but can also be related to the master transport ID assigned by the sellerOther IDs assigned by a stakeholder that relates to the shipment such as trade item ID (product code), sales order ID, etc.ISO standard 15459-1 provides a method to assign globally unambiguous transport unit IDs to the packages created at source when the seller dispatched the goods independent of any carrier and independent of any shipper. This standard is well over 20 years old and already in use in many parts of the supply chain and in transport as well, but as yet has not been universally adopted. It enables consistent tracking (and tracing) of the individual transport unit and the shipment associated with it and associated consignments.Similarly, the ISO standard 15459-6 provides a method to identify the shipment (master transport ID) in a globally unambiguous way. The European Commission Customs Guidelines for compliance with the new EU VAT E-commerce regulations[3] also reference this approach[4]. Numerous supply chains have implemented this approach quite successfully. In many cases, it meets the requirements of both cargo owners and authorities. However, the approach does not meet all business or regulatory requirements in all cases.In the case of rail transport, consignment notes (CIM) and wagon notes trace shipments involving handovers between shippers, forwarders and one or more rail undertakings (RU). These documents do constitute a contract between client and carrier.During intermodal transport, some type of standard identification or cross-referenced key data elements must be used to capture and pass the information easily to other stakeholders in the transaction, uniquely identifying the specific shipment.Perhaps a subset of information, normalised to accommodate each mode of transport, might enable the sufficient pertinent details to describe the shipment as unique in the seller to buyer transaction, and thus be recognised and acceptable in the future by regulatory officials. In order to accommodate this development for intermodal transport, the information needs to be provided and accepted into an information-sharing network, from which all authorised stakeholders can subscribe to the data for that shipment.UN/CEFACT has also initiated a new project requested by a number of member states and governmental organisations for tracking and tracing, with the aim to track, trace and monitor anything considered a product or service that may be identified by an ID from seller to buyer, and vice-versa in case of returns.This project will identify how global (data) standards, such those described in this article, may be used to deliver seamless end-to-end tracking across any mode of transport for a variety of use cases occurring most frequently in supply chains. The solution to this data communications impediment in today’s supply chains is an imperative building block toward providing more seamless intermodal tracking, which will help facilitate future international trade.Commonly adopted standard international identification method(s), and incorporation of them in operational processes, need to be acceptable to all parties. Regulations recommending, endorsing or even enforcing those methods will be introduced in the future, so that shipments and goods may cross international borders more smoothly than is customary today, enhancing trade facilitation.[1] UN/CEFACT and GS1 terminology; consignment is a collection of transport units or cargo transported under a single contract of carriage. IATA definition (which is equivalent to the term ‘shipment’) is one or more pieces of goods accepted by the carrier from one shipper at one time and at one address, receipted for in one lot and moving on one air waybill or shipment record to one consignee at on destination address.[2]  The European Interoperability Framework (EIF): https://ec.europa.eu/isa2/eif_en[3] https://ec.europa.eu/taxation_customs/business/vat/modernising-vat-cross-border-ecommerce_enThey come into force 1 July 2021[4] The guidelines will be finalised and published September 2020.About the authorsHanane Becha is actively driving smart assets standardisation for key industries such as maritime and rail freight. She is currently the DCSA IoT programme project lead. She is also the UN/CEFACT vice chair for transport and logistics, leading the UN/CEFACT Smart Container Project, as well as the UN/CEFACT Cross Industry Supply Chain Track and Trace Project. Hanane has received a PhD and an MSc in Computer Sciences from the University of Ottawa and a BSc from l’Université du Québec.Todd Frazier is strategic project lead in the US Regulatory Compliance Group and is the FedEx Express accredited representative to the International Air Transport Association (IATA). He is also chairman of the Cargo Services Conference, the cargo standards formulation body of IATA, and participates in several projects in UN/CEFACT.Rudy Hemeleers is director of 51Biz-PPMB Luxembourg, a management consultancy and policy advisor with private and public customers in multiple modes of transport including air-cargo, road and inland navigation.  He represents INE (Inland Navigation Europe) in the EU DTLF (Digital Transport and Logistics Forum). 51Biz Luxembourg is an external advisor of the Luxembourg government (e-CMR, eFTI, EU RISCOMEX). 51Biz coordinates the FEDeRATED EU-Gate living lab.Steen Erik Larsen is the head of technology M&A in AP Møller-Maersk, the global integrator of container logistics, connecting and simplifying the supply chains. Larsen has the responsibility for the enterprise risk management aspects pertaining to information technology in integration and partnering. He also represents Maersk in the Digital Container Shipping Association (DCSA).Bertrand Minary is chief innovation & digital officer at SNCF Logistics rail & multimodal division, the third rail freight company in Europe. Due to his important experience in supply chain, rail and digital, he is in charge of reinventing rail freight business with added value, using lean start-up, UX and agile approaches.Henk Mulder is head of digital cargo at the International Air Transport Association (IATA). He initiated and leads the ONE Record data sharing standard. Henk has degrees in IT Engineering and Mathematics.André Simha is the chief digital & information officer at Mediterranean Shipping Company (MSC), the second-largest container carrier in the world, whose team is responsible for implementing and developing the complex data flow between the company’s headquarters and its agencies around the globe, as well as steering the business towards the digital future of the shipping and logistics sector. Simha is also the chairman of the Digital Container Shipping Association (DCSA).Jaco Voorspuij is responsible for industry engagement transport & logistics at GS1, and has worked developing global data standards with various standardisation organisations (GS1, CEN, UN/CEFACT) and is co-chair of the International Taskforce Port Call Optimization.last_img read more

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Habbo: “The last month left a bruise on our community”

first_imgHabbo: “The last month left a bruise on our community”Sulake CEO Valtteri Karu on Habbo’s troubled migration from Flash to Unity, and how the firm aims to win back the trust of its playersMatthew HandrahanEditor-in-ChiefTuesday 16th February 2021Share this article Recommend Tweet ShareCompanies in this articleSulakeThe end of Flash was a bittersweet moment for many in the industry. Fertile ground for small creators and lucrative for a great many businesses, Adobe’s decision to finally bring its 25-year run to an end was greeted by a mix of warmth, nostalgia, and a little regret.For Sulake, however, it was the catalyst for a very public revolt in the community of its biggest game: Habbo, the virtual community known for most of its long life as Habbo Hotel, which had been a Flash game for more than a decade.”We had a look, two years ago, at what we wanted to have Habbo be in the next ten years,” says Valtteri Karu, CEO of the Finnish company. “It was quite obvious, first of all, the underlying technology [Flash] was going away, so that was the trigger. And also our mission of accessing new users and new markets, it wasn’t so easy to do with the game as it was at the time. A lot of how the game works… It has grown older with us.”Habbo evolved over a long period of time. Like any online community, its systems, customs, culture and economy were intimately familiar to loyal players, but could be impenetrable to newcomers. According to Karu, the need to switch to the Unity engine was seen as an opportunity to prepare Habbo for the future — becoming more accessible to more people, by both refining the user experience and improving its mobile strategy.”Our mission of accessing new users and new markets, it wasn’t so easy to do with the game as it was at the time” “We started to look into mechanics that would get new users enjoying the game a lot easier than before,” Karu says. “And also Habbo’s mobile presence, that’s basically non-existent. There is an old client that is more like a companion app. We wanted to have a unified client where we could give the experience of Habbo on all devices.”Sulake started to publicly reveal its plans in October last year, inviting a select group from the Habbo community to a closed beta. In December, just a few weeks before Adobe’s deadline for the end of Flash, it launched the open beta, and a much larger number of players were exposed to the various changes and improvements — a comprehensive breakdown of which can be found here. To say that the transition didn’t go according to Sulake’s plans would be a gross understatement. By the end of December, #SaveHabbo was trending on Twitter in countries around the world, as parts of the community rallied against the new version — complaints included technical instability, the removal of features that helped with moderation and player safety, new restrictions on player-to-player trading, and the introduction of fees and taxes that were construed as profiteering. One of Habbo’s main player groups, US Defence Force, drew up a list of demands, sent them to Sulake, and staged a 72-hour walkout. “Now, when we were able to expose the game to a wider audience, we saw what we got right and what we didn’t get right” “The more controversial things — like [player] trading — they did get mixed up a little bit with [the fact] that the game client wasn’t ready enough,” Karu explains. “Things were not necessarily completely removed. They were working differently, but they were not working as [intended] when they were designed. We ended up in a situation with this incompleteness, with a change of features, and they kind of crashed into [each other] at the same time. And then it started to be fairly hard to make changes in the design.”In truth, concern over the changes emerged earlier than December and the open beta, but Sulake’s ability to respond was limited by the looming end of Flash itself. In simple terms, the task of migrating Habbo to Unity had to come first, regardless of how the community was responding to the new direction of the game. The window to launch the Unity version was closing, and closing fast.”It would have been [better to launch earlier], but there was too much work to be done for us to start it earlier,” Karu says. “The teams did a lot of work getting to the open beta at the time it went out. It was not left until the final moments [on purpose].”By the start of January, Sulake was taking steps to pacify the community, issuing an official response to the #SaveHabbo campaign. That also proved divisive, however, with parts of the community finding the concessions to be inadequate relative to their ongoing issues with the new version of the game.”We are talking with them, and they are sending tickets and discussing publicly with us what’s wrong with the game, how we should change it,” Karu says. “On that part, we have to do better.”Since that first response at the start of January, Sulake has continued to walk back changes — reducing, for example, the size of the fees it introduced for player transactions in Habbo’s marketplace. According to Karu, changes to trading and the marketplace were the focus of much of the community’s frustration; while Habbo is ostensibly aimed at teens and younger players, it had a relatively complex player-to-player economy that was open to exploitation. In trying to address the problem with an incomplete new version of the game, Karu says, Sulake left itself open to criticism.”Because not all the bits and pieces are in place to fully explain what the feature will be, it feels incomplete, and it feels more like taking away. “We’re going to buy more time by offering the old game, so we can continue working on Habbo with the vision we had” “It’s largely a user-run economy, and there’s this very wide range of behaviour from users, where they are running the economy in their own bubble. We are struggling a little bit to fully comprehend from all different directions how it works. And only now, when we were able to expose the game to a wider audience, we saw what we got right and what we didn’t get right.”It’s not so clear for the users that the need [within the community] is so varied. If we cater to the status quo for one portion of the community, then some other part feels left out, and then we have to balance it.”The process of making the new Unity client for Habbo took two years, and if the recent problems in the game’s community make anything clear, it’s that Sulake’s work is far from over. It will continue to improve and balance the new version of Habbo, but last week it also announced the release of a downloadable version of the old Flash client. Players will be able to interact across both versions of the game, though the features of each will be different. The Unity version will evolve over time, the Flash version will stay the same, as if sealed in amber.”They are going to get their old game back, and let’s see if the users accept this,” Karu says. “The last month left a bruise on our community, and it’s up to us to redeem ourselves — showing that we do listen, and we are on the users’ side.Related JobsSenior Build Engineer – AAA Studio – Yorkshire UK & Europe Big Planet3D Artist – Mobile Studio – Midlands UK & Europe Big PlanetProducer Indie Game Studio France UK & Europe Big PlanetDiscover more jobs in games “We are going to buy more time by offering the old game. We will make the necessary changes to the new client, so we can continue working on Habbo with the vision we had.”For us, the whole point of [moving to] Unity was that, throughout these years, it became harder and harder to make serious development in ActionScript. The technology had come to its end, and it’s not just that the support was dropped… What we really intend to do, it’s for the next ten years. The game and what kind of content we can give to the users, the roadmap is very, very long.”Should we give the players all they want? They’re gonna get a good chunk of it.”Celebrating employer excellence in the video games industry8th July 2021Submit your company Sign up for The Publishing & Retail newsletter and get the best of GamesIndustry.biz in your inbox. Enter your email addressMore storiesAzerion fully acquires Habbo Hotel developer SulakePan-European gaming and adtech firm buys remaining 49% having held a controlling stake since 2018By James Batchelor 3 months agoOrangeGames acquires majority stake in SulakeHabbo creator will make use of stakeholder’s global network to further distribution of its social communitiesBy Rebekah Valentine 2 years agoLatest comments Sign in to contributeEmail addressPasswordSign in Need an account? 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The social value of good building

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

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West Ham midfielder is a £100m player, says Manuel Pellegrini

first_img Boxing Day fixtures: All nine Premier League games live on talkSPORT Sky Sports presenter apologises for remarks made during Neville’s racism discussion Top nine Premier League free transfers of the decade scrap LATEST 1 SORRY Every time Ally McCoist lost it on air in 2019, including funny XI reactions West Ham United boss Manuel Pellegrini believes Jack Wilshere has saved the club £100million.The England midfielder joined the Hammers on a three-year deal in July after leaving Arsenal at the end of his contract. Berahino hits back at b******t Johnson criticism – ‘I was in a dark place at Stoke’ Gerrard launches furious touchline outburst as horror tackle on Barisic sparks chaos RANKED BEST OF Did Mahrez just accidentally reveal Fernandinho is leaving Man City this summer? center_img The average first-team salaries at every Premier League club in 2019 whoops Liverpool news live: Klopp reveals when Minamino will play and issues injury update latest Wilshere had been sidelined with an ankle injury for three months before making his return as a late substitute in West Ham’s 3-0 win at Newcastle on Saturday.The 26-year-old’s career has been plagued by injuries, which made his high-profile arrival at the London Stadium a “high risk”, according to his manager.Pellegrini said: “We knew before he was not a player who would be available for every game, every week, but was a player of a quality that is not easy to bring to West Ham at a price we could afford. Injuries have restricted Jack Wilshere to just five appearances this season Arsenal transfer news LIVE: Ndidi bid, targets named, Ozil is ‘skiving little git’ “Maybe players of the quality of Wilshere at this moment can cost £100million, £90million, £70million. Good creative midfielders are very expensive.“He wanted to play at West Ham, we took the risk and it has not been a good month for him but we have the second part of the season and I hope he will play most part of the games.”Wilshere will be pushing for a start when West Ham host Cardiff on Tuesday evening. revealed REPLY Latest football news gameday cracker last_img read more

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On Thanksgiving, here’s how to be grateful

first_imgIn honor of the spirit of Thanksgiving gratitude, today and tomorrow I’m posting examples of great nonprofit thank-yous.Today, I want to share two effective videos – one with a budget and one done with next to no budget!The first is from WaterAid:The second is from CentroNía and is dedicated to donors, volunteers, and community partners. The DIY video was filmed and edited by Jonah Best, a summer 2012 Summer Youth Employment Program intern. CentroNía is a nationally recognized, award-winning educational organization that provides affordable, high quality education, professional development and family support services in a bilingual, multicultural environment to more than 1,500 children.Happy Thanksgiving!last_img read more

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