My digital life … Philip Houghton

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAYlast_img read more

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STEAM rises during Farmington Founders Festival

first_imgMore than a month has passed since the Greater Farmington Founders Festival, and one thing seems certain: People have differing opinions about how it went.Organized by the Greater Farmington Area Chamber, the event brought music, food vendors, activities for kids and teens, and a little controversy to downtown Farmington. Events were also held at Shiawassee Park.Chamber Director Mary Martin, who was hired last November, jumped into the planning process by meeting with committees in December. She said the STEAM (Science Technology Engineering Arts Math) theme reflected what’s happening in the community, such as the opening of the Farmington Public Schools STEAM Academy in the former Dunckel Middle School on 12 Mile Road.The Hackbots drew attention on Farmington Road with their robotics display. New activities included two days of “STEAM Heat” in Shiawassee Park with the Ann Arbor Hands On Museum and a Mad Science show on the State Street stage. Martin said a booth on Farmington Road showcasing the Hackbots, a Farmington Public Schools robotics team, was also a big hit.“The kids were just drawn to that,” she said. “They loved it… Seeing how those were accepted, I was really happy about that.”The popularity of a Friday “Light the Night” display of hot air balloons in Shiawassee Park “caught everybody by surprise,” Martin said. Hundreds of people showed up to watch the balloons, even though they never left the ground.Hot air balloons light up the night and drew hundreds of people to Shiawassee Park. But the event wasn’t without controversy. One business owner was particularly vocal on social media with complaints about the closing of Farmington Road, which restricted access to his business.Martin said the decision was made to carve out a space for kids who were “too old for bounce houses” and activities in Shiawassee Park. The State Street stage hosted shows from morning through late afternoon; some booths, several inflatables, and a climbing wall filled in the area south of State.Activities for older children occupied Farmington Road during Founders Festival.One perpetual complaint in recent years has centered around the “Crafters Marketplace,” formerly located on Farmington Road and moved this year to Riley Park and Market Place, the street on the park’s west side. Crafters and artists displayed their wares but seemed outnumbered by commercial vendors, like home improvement and home-based businesses.Farmington Voice reader Kristen O’Dea pointed out a conflict that may limit the Festival’s ability to draw more creatives.“In my opinion, Farmington won’t be in a position to compete for crafters/artists if (the Festival is) held the same weekend as the Ann Arbor Art Fair,” she said. Also held the third weekend in July, that event draws hundreds of artists from around the country.Lesa Ferencz, also a Voice reader, said the Crafters Marketplace usually brings her family out for the daytime part of the festival. This year, they “browsed very little, bought nothing.”“We don’t give the commercial, informational, and carnival-type booths any of our attention,” she said. “The layout felt very disjointed to me which left the daytime activities feeling empty and frustrating. Our faith in the craft booth part of the festival has been slim to none for a very long time.”“We shopped at Bead Bohemia, Sunflour Bakehaus, and Dagwood’s while we were in town for the festival,” she added.Martin said she has considered adding something like a Maker Faire next year.“If we did that with the STEAM stuff, that would be great branding for us,” she said.Financially, the Festival brought in about 5.5 percent more in revenues over last year. What stood out most in her first year, Martin said, was the community, the volunteers (including many Chamber members), attending a “heart-warming” Miss Farmington pageant, and the success of the first-ever Color Run, which preceded Saturday’s parade.“Those are the kinds of things I can look back on and say, that was so much fun, and the community embraced them,” she said. Reported by admin Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Florida Gators seek softball title repeat

first_imgAlabama celebrates their 5-3 win over Oklahoma with their infielder Marisa Runyon (9), who hit the game-winning grand slam.Alabama celebrates their 5-3 win over Oklahoma with their infielder Marisa Runyon (9), who hit the game-winning grand slam.OKLAHOMA CITY – Defending champion Florida leads five Southeastern Conference schools in the field for the eight-team Women’s College World Series.Alabama, Tennessee, Auburn and LSU are the other SEC qualifiers. Action starts Thursday at ASA Hall of Fame Stadium.Florida, the No. 1 seed, defeated Kentucky in Super Regional play to advance. The Gators won the series opener, and then took the second game on Sunday when Lauren Haeger tossed a three-hitter in a 1-0 victory. The game’s lone run scored on a single by Justine McLean in the fourth inning.Florida will play No. 8 seed Tennessee on Thursday.Alabama, last year’s national runner-up, might have had the toughest road to Oklahoma City. The Crimson Tide defeated Oklahoma in the Super Regional.No. 6 seed Alabama lost the first game, and then grabbed a pair of wins on Saturday. Oklahoma’s Lauren Chamberlain, the career leader for home runs in Division I, went deep twice in the deciding game on Saturday, but Marisa Runyon’s grand slam lifted the Crimson Tide to a 5-3 win.Runyon had no hits in the Super Regional until she cranked the grand slam.“I just wanted to get it done,” she said. “I didn’t care about any other at-bat. Mentally, I just thought, ‘Whatever, it happens.’ I just wanted to get at least one run in and hit the ball hard and let fate tell the rest.”Alabama won 2-0 in the first game of Saturday’s doubleheader. Freshman Alexis Osorio struck out Chamberlain with the bases loaded in the fifth inning.“It was a really tight situation,” Osorio said. “I knew I needed to just stay calm, relax and stay within myself. I had to do whatever it took for the team.”Chamberlain ended her career with 95 home runs.Alabama will play No. 3 seed Michigan, which advanced with a sweep against Georgia.No. 4 seed Auburn beat Louisiana-Lafayette on Saturday to advance to the College World Series for the first time. Auburn coach Clint Myers had discussed the possibility with his team throughout the season.“We’re not afraid to talk about things we believe in,” Myers told AuburnTigers.com. “We believed this club had potential — with some hard work and a little luck, we’d be able to do some great things.”The Tigers will play No. 5 seed LSU.No. 2 seed Oregon will face No. 7 seed UCLA in a Pac-12 matchup.last_img read more

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