Education Minister Says NEI Report Shows That Gaps Need To Be Filled

first_imgMinister of Education, Hon. Rev. Ronald Thwaites, says the National Education Inspectorate (NEI) Report, which has identified deficiencies in the sector, is an indication that gaps need to be filled in the system.The Report, which assessed the operation of nearly 1,000 schools, found glaring weaknesses in school leadership and management, and faulty teaching/learning methods.It also found that strong security and wellness programmes exist at many of the nation’s secondary educational institutions, as well as a high level of awareness among students on relevant issues.Speaking at the launch of the Report, held on Tuesday, September 15, at the Overseas Examinations Commission, in St. Andrew, the Minister said no time should be wasted in casting blames for deficiencies in the education system, as all efforts must be made to deliver results for students.“That is why we have to take these reports very seriously; that is why we don’t want any argument that it is not my fault as teacher, or my responsibility, because the home is not right,” the Minister told the audience.He argued that although challenges at some homes might affect the learning of children, there is a responsibility for teachers and Ministry officials to give of their best.“We still have to do our duty, we have to stop making excuses, and we have to stop finding a problem for every solution. Our task is to add value. We now have the empirical tool to do so, there is no excuse,” the Minister emphasised.Meanwhile, Chief Inspector, Maureen Dwyer, said her team of inspectors found that where school leadership focus on the core business of education, staff was inspired, and children eager to learn.“Those leaders were the ones who made the balance between the social side of things, and the academic learning,” she said.The mandate of the NEI is to assess the standards attained by the students in primary and secondary schools at key points in their education, and to report on how well they perform, or improve.The NEI makes recommendations to the Ministry of Education to support improvement in the provision of quality education. The full Report can be obtained at: www.nei.org. RelatedTwo Honoured With Spanish Order of Civil Merit RelatedEvery School To Have Literacy Coordinator FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Education Minister Says NEI Report Shows That Gaps Need To Be Filled EducationSeptember 16, 2015Written by: Garfield L. Angus RelatedTeachers To Be Trained To Improve The Way Boys Learncenter_img Photo: JIS PhotographerMinister of Education, Hon. Rev. Ronald Thwaites (left), is joined by public and private sector officials in perusing the 2015 National Education Inspectorate (NEI) Report, at its launch, today (September 15), at the Overseas Examinations Commission, in St. Andrew. From second left are: businessman, R. Danny Williams; Chief Inspector, Maureen Dwyer, and Director General at the Planning Institute of Jamaica (PIOJ), Colin Bullock. Story HighlightsMinister of Education, Hon. Rev. Ronald Thwaites, says the National Education Inspectorate (NEI) Report, which has identified deficiencies in the sector, is an indication that gaps need to be filled in the system.The Report, which assessed the operation of nearly 1,000 schools, found glaring weaknesses in school leadership and management, and faulty teaching/learning methods.It also found that strong security and wellness programmes exist at many of the nation’s secondary educational institutions, as well as a high level of awareness among students on relevant issues. Education Minister Says NEI Report Shows That Gaps Need To Be FilledJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay Advertisementslast_img read more

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Behavioral Health

first_imgCommunity Counseling ProgramThe Community Counseling Program (CCP) uses a holistic approach to assist people with overcoming some of life’s most difficult challenges. The CCP team is composed of licensed clinicians who provide short-term, nonmedical counseling to individuals, couples and families. Some of our areas of specialty include, but are not limited to, grief and loss, marital issues, parent-child relationships, communication and anger management. CCP also provides case management services and suicide prevention outreach through the Marine Intercept Program. CCP has two convenient locations and referrals are accepted via phone and internet request through the CCP website. Walk-ins are also accepted. CCP can be reached on the west side at 703-432-6442 in Cox Hall, 24009 Montezuma Ave., Camp Barrett, and on the main side at 703-784-3523 in Little Hall, 2034 Barnett Ave.Consolidated Substance Abuse Counseling CenterThe Consolidated Substance Abuse Counseling Center (CSACC) provides a continuum of substance abuse treatment and prevention services that are individualized and tailored to meet the specific needs of Marines, retirees and their family members 18 years and older.Substance abuse treatment services are delivered in the form of group and individual sessions consisting of individual assessment and screenings, outpatient and intensive outpatient groups, relapse prevention groups, family support groups, individual counseling sessions and referrals to residential treatment programs. Our prevention services consist of early intervention groups and workshops that are tailored to meet the needs of individuals, units and commands. CSACC can be reached on the west side at 703-432-6442 in Cox Hall, 24009 Montezuma Ave., Camp Barrett, and on the main side at 703-784-3502 in Little Hall, 2034 Barnett Ave.Exceptional Family Member ProgramThe Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) is a mandatory enrollment program for active-duty personnel who have authorized family members with diagnosed medical or educational conditions. The primary goal of the program is to ensure that military sponsors are assigned to locations where services exist to support the Exceptional Family Member (spouse, child, stepchild, adopted child, foster child or a dependent parent) residing with the sponsor who may require special medical or educational services based upon a diagnosed physical, intellectual or emotional hardship. The program also provides support services to include respite care, educational and informational forums on various topics specific to persons with disabilities, and a support group and volunteer network to families. EFMP is on the main side at 122 Neville Road. For more information, call 571-931-0524 and on the west side of Cox Hall, 24009 Montezuma Ave., Camp Barrett, call 703-432-6442.Family Advocacy ProgramThe Family Advocacy Program (FAP) is a command-sponsored program that incorporates a multidisciplinary approach to preventing family violence and child abuse by protecting victims and providing prevention, education and treatment services. Through this approach, the FAP addresses risk factors; underlying causes and effects of family violence on both adult and child victims; and rehabilitation. Services provided on an ongoing basis include stress and anger management; relationship and communication workshops; conflict management; domestic violence groups for victims and offenders; and groups for children exposed to family violence. FAP also offers individual, marital and family counseling services. The Family Advocacy Program has two offices and can be reached on main side at 703-784-2570 in Little Hall, 2034 Barnett Ave., and on the west side at 703-432-6442 in Cox Hall, 24009 Montezuma Ave., Camp Barrett. The 24/7 FAP Victim Advocacy Helpline number is 703-350-1688.Family Readiness ProgramFamily readiness is a combat multiplier, as important as individual, equipment and combat readiness. It is the ability of the individual Marine and their family to successfully balance life, career and mission events through active and reserve service, and is supported by the enduring partnership between the unit’s Family Readiness Command Team and Marine Corps Community Services. It is an obligation between the Corps, the Marine and their entire family. The individual Marine is responsible and accountable for his personal and family readiness.The Unit Family Readiness Program is the responsibility of the commanding officer. Marine Corps Community Services (MCCS) is responsible for supporting the individual Marine, their family and the Unit Family Readiness Program. Contact your unit’s family readiness officer or the trainer at 703-634-2765 or 703-634-2678 or visit www.quantico.usmc-mccs.org/index.cfm/marine-family/family-readiness.Lifestyle, Insights, Networking, Knowledge and SkillsLifestyle, Insights, Networking, Knowledge and Skills (L.I.N.K.S.) is a volunteer, team-mentoring program designed by Marine Corps spouses. The program offers an orientation to the Marine Corps lifestyle, helping spouses, Marines, children, teens, parents and extended family members understand and adapt to the unique challenges military life often presents. While the curriculum targets those who are new to the Marine Corps community, the information is very beneficial at all levels of Marine Corps experience. For information, contact the trainer at 703-634-2663 or visit www.quantico.usmc-mccs.org.Military and Family Life Counselor ProgramThe Military and Family Life Counselor Program (MFLC) provides confidential short-term nonmedical counseling and psycho-education services to service members and their families. MFLCs offer flexible services and may meet for services on or off the installation. For more information, call 703-414-9882/9888.New Parent Support ProgramThe New Parent Support Program (NPSP) is a prevention and outreach program that offers in-home visits, parenting education, support groups, and information and referral for the Marine Corps community who are expecting a child or who are parenting young children up to 6 years old. It is designed to empower expectant and parents of all experience levels to meet the challenges of parenthood and military life. The NPSP Home Visitors are registered nurses, licensed social workers and licensed marriage and family therapists. The purpose of home visits is to provide individualized parenting education and support to parents of young children. The groups and classes include Understanding Pregnancy, Baby Boot Camp, breast-feeding support, Baby and Me, and Toddler Time. To learn more about NPSP’s many programs, contact the west side at 703-432-6442 in Cox Hall, 24009 Montezuma Ave., Camp Barrett, and on main side at 703-784-4248 in Little Hall, 2034 Barnett Ave.Women, Infants and Children ProgramThe Women Infants and Children Program (WIC) program is a special supplemental nutrition program for Women, Infants and Children. Military families who meet program requirements are eligible to receive services free of charge. Participants in the program receive vouchers for milk, eggs, cheese, juice, hot and cold cereal, dried beans, peas, fresh fruit and vegetables, peanut butter, formula and whole grains. WIC serves pregnant women and children from birth up to age 5. WIC services are available on Monday and Wednesday in the New Parent Support office in Little Hall, 2034 Barnett Ave. For more information, call 703-792-7319 or email [email protected]last_img read more

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Barnhart transforms Missouri

first_imgBarnhart offloaded the transformer, which measured 28.8 ft x 11.5 ft x 16.1 ft (8.7 m x 3.5 m x 4.9 m), from the railcar and onto a girder bridge trailer using a jack and slide system, ready for the 70 mile (112.6 km) delivery overland.On arrival in Centerville, Barnhart used another jack and slide system to unload the transformer onto its foundation.  www.barnhartcrane.comlast_img

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