Armed Andrews Man Arrested After Stand Off

first_imgSheriff Derrick Palmer announced that December 20th, 2017 arrest of 41-year-old Clyde Dean Dyer of Andrews, North Carolina for charges stemming from an armed standoff with Cherokee County Deputies.On December 19th, 2017 at approximately 10:45 pm, Patrol Deputies of the Cherokee County Sheriff’s Office responded to an Andrews, North Carolina residence to investigate a report of a Clyde Dean Dyer, who was armed and holding a mother and two children against their will. Further information was provided that if law enforcement officers arrived at the residence that Dyer stated he would kill the officers.As Patrol Deputies arrived on scene, Cherokee County EMS was staged at a safe distance to provide further assistance if needed. Additionally, Cherokee Tribal PD SWAT was requested to come to the scene to provide additional tactical assistance.As the situation unfolded, the Patrol Deputies positioned themselves and were able to remove the two children from the residence. Shortly thereafter, Dyer pointed a rifle at the Patrol Deputies and discharged it.After assuring the safety of the two children, the Patrol Deputies repositioned themselves around the trailer and short time later Dyer exited the residence and was subdued by the Patrol Deputies. It was later learned that Dyer had been wrestling with his wife who had taken a loaded .45 caliber pistol from Dyer just prior to his exit from the trailer. The .45 caliber pistol and a .22 magnum rifle were seized from the residence.Dyer was arrested and transported to the Cherokee County Detention Center where he was charged with 3 counts Kidnapping First Degree, 5 counts Assault with A Firearm on a Law Enforcement Officer, Assault on a Female, Assault by Pointing a Gun, 5 Counts of Resisting Officer. Dyer is currently under a $250,000.00 secure bond. Dyer is expected to be in Cherokee County District Court on January 19th, 2018.last_img read more

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Africa in the new world order

first_img13 October 2010The world is changing – this is now well known. What is less well known or not yet understood is that Africa is changing as much as, if not more than, the rest of the world. Africa is the second-fastest-growing region in the world, after “Developing Asia”, and has been for most of the last decade. Forecasts from the International Monetary Fund and the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) expect this to continue to be the case.Shifting balance of global economyThe first decade of 21st century has seen some of the most profound changes in the balance of the world economy. The dramatic extent of the shift was evident during the depths of the world financial crisis. During the course of 2009, the economies of the OECD member countries shrank by about 3.3%. Only three members of the OECD grew at all – South Korea, Australia and Poland. Overall, gross fixed investment fell in the OECD countries by nearly 12% and unemployment rose sharply.At the same time, developing countries grew by about 1.2%. So, in the middle of the financial crisis, the developing grew 4.5% faster than the OECD member countries. And investment remained positive in many of these countries.In the past it was the other way around – when the industrialised countries sneezed, the world got a cold. In the past, economists from the developed countries told the developing countries what they should be doing. In the past, they said that developing countries should behave more like the developed countries.No country is an islandThis time the virus has attacked the industrialised countries most severely, and they have been looking at developing countries like China, India, Brazil and South Africa to help pull them from recession back to growth.The developing countries are not autonomous from the industrialised countries. Indeed, the world economy is more integrated than ever before, and all markets are linked. Yet, we do now have a world where the sources of growth are multiple – it is no longer a case of one or two locomotives pulling the world economy forward. This is “the new reality”.The dynamism in the world economy is clearly shifting from North to South and from West to East. The OECD Development Centre estimates that, measured in terms of real domestic buying power, the developing countries will have a larger share of the world economy than the OECD countries by 2012. By 2030, developing countries will have 57% of the world economy, and the current OECD members 43%.Africa in a new lightThe developing world contributed almost 70% of world growth measured in terms of domestic buying power during the last decade. China alone contributed nearly 30% of world growth.Africa is now seen in a new light. It came through the depths of the economic crisis better than many expected, growing even faster than the average for emerging and developing economies during the crisis. Africa grew by about 2.5%, on average, during 2009. While a few of the bigger economies were more severely affected by the crisis, most African countries grew even faster than that.This is an edited excerpt of a speech by South African Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe to the Emerging Markets Summit 2010: the New Reality. Download the original speech in PDF format (120 KB).This article was published in South Africa Now, a six-page supplement to the Washington Post produced on behalf of Brand South Africa. Download South Africa Now (PDF, 2.12 MB).last_img read more

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Public works programmes ‘have benefited 3.5m people’

first_img21 February 2014 South Africa’s Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) has been a success story which has benefited more than 3.5-million people since it was introduced in 2004, President Jacob Zuma said in Cape Town on Thursday. Replying to the debate on the State of the Nation address in Parliament, Zuma dismissed the criticism of some members of the opposition, who had said that the EPWP was not a solution to unemployment in South Africa. Zuma said the formal economy could not absorb all work seekers, adding: “The fact is this innovation has made a massive impact in the lives of the poor.” Working for Water and similar programes that set people working to tackle waste and fire hazards and support the country’s wetlands, together with the Environmental Youth Services Programme, had created about 750 000 work opportunities and more than 200 000 full-time equivalent jobs since 2009. More than half of the beneficiaries of these programmes were young people, Zuma said, noting that the majority of South Africa’s unemployed were reportedly between the ages of and 24 and 30. Meanwhile, Zuma said that social grants remained the most effective poverty alleviation tool in addressing the legacy of apartheid. More than 16-million people in South Africa are beneficiaries of social grants. For more than 22% of households in the country, social grants are the main source of income. “It must also be noted that the majority of beneficiaries of social grants, 11-million specifically, are vulnerable children,” Zuma said. “The rest of the beneficiaries are older persons receiving the old age pension, persons with disability, military veterans and other vulnerable persons.” Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

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Detex: Maximum-Security, Multi-Point Lock – Booth 167

first_imgDetex introduces a maximum security, multi-point lock so big and strong that it stands up to assault by the bad guys and reduces employee and customer theft.The ECL-230X-TDB is a heavy-duty, easy-to-install, three-bolt, multi-point lock whose construction takes panic hardware to a new level of toughness and eases your back-door security worries. It is designed with a larger deadbolt that goes deeper into the frame than other locks in the category. Connecting rods are solid steel, rather than the less-reliable hollow rod/cable construction. Life safety and code compliant, the new Detex ECL-230X-TDB serves as both panic hardware and a maximum-strength locking device.The ECL-230X-TDB includes a photo-luminescent sign available in more than 10 color/language combinations, 100-decibel alarm and three locking points per door.- Sponsor – Top Deadbolt – approximately 1” wide by 1/2” thick deadbolt, the top bolt provides additional stability to the top corner of the door.Side Deadbolt – 2-1/4” tall by 1/2” thick deadbolt with a 1” throw allows for 3/4” penetration into strike (Detex recommends Flush installation for maximum security). With 1.6875 square inches of bolt engagement, the side deadbolt provides superior defense against pulling and prying on the side of the door.Bottom bolt – 5/8” HEX bolt with 3/4” throw, engages the floor with 5/8” penetration provides better attack resistance and superior defense against the “peeling up” of the bottom of the door.Combining the ECL-230X-TDB with Detex’s DX Bolts provides an additional line of defense against break-ins via additional locking points. Even if the exterior door hinges are compromised the DX bolts keep the door locked and secure. These passive deadbolts are easy to install and offer another layer of attack resistance. Add suffix DX3 (ECL-230X-TDB-DX3) for 6 locking points for even stronger security.How tough is the ECL-230X-TDB? Independent laboratory testing proves a door secured by the ECL-230X-TDB, and when combined with 3 DX Bolts can withstand 16,000 lbs of pull force.Optional accessories include rod covers, bottom bolt guard, hinge side locking (DX) bolts, Battery Eliminator (BE-961), and inside pull handle. For outdoor installation, an adjustable gate plate is available. Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

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