News / Trucks on the world cargo crime front line – hijacking still the main threat

first_img In-transit hijackings are the number-one threat to trucking operations around the world, according to a new report by insurer TT Club and supply chain intelligence provider BSI.Cargo Theft 1H 2018 reports that haulage is by far the most vulnerable freight mode and that, in global terms, hijacking is the most likely way theft would take place.In South America, hijacking represents 55% of all truck theft, while in Africa and the Middle East it accounts for 51%.And being a trucker in Brazil now appears to mean working on the frontline of the country’s terrifyingly violent drug wars.Cargo hijacking incidents were in the tens of thousands in the first half of this year alone, as organised crime gangs increasingly see cargo has a way of bolstering revenue, as well as a means of transporting drugs.“One likely factor that explains why cargo theft has risen so steeply in Brazil is the entrance of major gangs into the country’s illegal drug trade and their need to finance such ventures,” says the report.“The First Capital Gang is one such organised criminal group that BSI has identified as being tied to both cargo theft and illegal drug trafficking via cargo shipments.“A lack of sufficient police resources and response almost certainly enabled the rate of cargo theft to expand in Brazil over the last several years,” adds the report.Brazil accounted for some 90% of South America’s cargo thefts, while in North and Central America, Mexico led with the way with 68% of the region’s freight crime.Unsurprisingly, with such a violent recent history, hijacking is also the number-one criminal tactic in Mexico, with thieves using guns to stop trucks, routinely taking drivers hostage and “holding these personnel generally for a short period of time in an attempt to delay police response”.In contrast, thieves in the US and Canada tend to target “unattended cargo trucks, parked at unsecure locations, including truck stops and gas stations” and that hijacking remains rare.A similar picture was found in Europe, where unsecure truck stops are a huge concern for truck operators, particularly since strict regulations on drivers’ hours often force trucks to stop in unsecured locations.“It is much easier for thieves to target an unsecured cargo truck than it is to infiltrate and steal goods from often more-secured warehouses and other types of supply chain facility locations,” says the report.“The prevalence of soft-sided trailers in Europe also promulgates this trend and primarily explains the high frequency of the slash and grab tactic, in which thieves cut into the tarpaulin covering trailers in order to quickly remove goods.” By Gavin van Marle 09/11/2018 ©Welcomialast_img read more

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Japanese American Memorial Monument

first_imgYouthBuild had temporarily suspended all activities in the spring and early summer of 2020 due to social distancing restrictions of the corona virus pandemic. In January, VCH YouthBuild staffers Orlando Nava and Tyquanique Jackson met YB volunteers Alexandria, Carmen, Kaylyn, Roberto, Steven, Aaron, Jorge, Sergio, and Keven. In June, VCH YouthBuild staffer Marisol Perez met YB volunteers Luis Rose, Nehemiah, and Coral.  In July, VCH YouthBuild staffer Brandy Alonzo met YB volunteers Robert, Nehemiah, Luis Rose, Destiny Dex, Devin, Montavius, and Coral.  In September, VCH YouthBuild staffer Orlando Nava met YB volunteers Kaylyn, Jose, Alexandria, Joseph, Geo, and Joey.  The VJAMM Committee deeply appreciates the volunteers, who Windex the solid black granite VJAMM obelisk, and sweep up the accumulated debris from the sidewalks and curbs around the VJAMM.   Venice Community Housing, a 501(c) (3) non-profit organization, celebrates thirty years of affordable housing and community development, and serves as the fiscal sponsor for the Venice Arts Council and the Venice Japanese American Memorial Monument Committee.  VJAMM Committee member Phyllis Hayashibara asks the volunteers to read aloud to each other the VJAMM text on the front, the quotes on the west side, about Manzanar on the back, map side; and to acknowledge the many major donors who have made the VJAMM possible on the east side.  She hopes this gives to the volunteers a sense of the VJAMM’s historical context and current relevancy.  In a moment of bittersweet poignancy, Phyllis noted that the inspiring and outspoken Arnold Maeda had recently passed away on September 10, 2020.  His quote laments having to leave behind his beloved dog, Boy, as he readied for his forced removal from Santa Monica and incarceration in Manzanar at the age of fifteen.   Of the five former Manzanar internees who provided quotes for the VJAMM, only Brian Maeda and Mae Kakehashi remain alive.  Amy Ioki passed away on June 4, 2020; and Yosh Tomita passed away on January 19, 2017.    For more information about the VJAMM, please visit www.venicjamm.org. Local youth are working to maintain the Venice Japanese American Memorial Monument. Venice YouthBuild, a program of Venice Community Housing, provides education, job training and leadership development services to out-of-school and out-of-work youth, ages 18-24.  Community service comprises an important part of the YouthBuild program.  center_img The VJAMM Committee dedicated the Venice Japanese American Memorial Monument on April 27, 2017.  The VJAMM commemorates the northwest corner of Venice and Lincoln Boulevards, where some 1,000 persons of Japanese ancestry forcibly removed from Venice, Santa Monica, and Malibu reported in April, 1942.  They lined up with only what they could carry, and boarded buses to take them to what would become the War Relocation Camp at Manzanar, where they would be incarcerated in violation of their Constitutional rights to the writ of habeas corpus and due process, most for the duration of World War II.   HomeFeaturedJapanese American Memorial Monument Oct. 10, 2020 at 6:00 amFeaturedNewsPeopleJapanese American Memorial Monumenteditor8 months agoJapanese American Memorial MonumentYouthBuild programLocal youth are working to maintain the Venice Japanese American Memorial Monument. The Venice Japanese American Memorial Monument Committee thanks the volunteers of YouthBuild of Venice Community Housing, for resuming its regular, monthly maintenance of the VJAMM obelisk on the northwest corner of Venice and Lincoln Boulevards.  Thanks to a generous donation from Dr. Thomas Yoshikawa, the VJAMM Committee provided BBQ chicken bowl lunches from Rutt’s Hawaiian Café for the volunteers in September, who arrived at the VJAMM at noon.   Submitted by Phyllis HayashibaraTags :Japanese American Memorial MonumentYouthBuild programshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentSMC Board Passes Resolution in Support of HR 763OIR Group Selected to Lead May 31 After Action ReportYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall5 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press16 hours agoNewsWedding boom is on in the US as vendors scramble to keep upAssociated Press16 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson16 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter16 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor16 hours agolast_img read more

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Playoffs Pulse: Stacking the field after Dover

first_img9.Aric Almirola-10 11.Kyle Larson-12 7.Brad Keselowski+21 6.Kurt Busch+21 5.Joey Logano+31 RankDriverPoints to cutoff —————CUT-OFF LINE—————center_img 8.Ryan Blaney+10 After the fourth Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series Playoffs race, here’s a brief look at the playoffs picture. There are two races remaining in the Round of 12 before the field is whittled to eight, with four drivers eliminated from the postseason following Kansas (Oct. 21).WinnerChase Elliott notched his second win of his Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series career and advanced to the Round of 8 in the NASCAR Playoffs. Elliott stayed out on old tires to take the lead spot and survived two restarts — including one in NASCAR Overtime — to claim a victory on a day when he had to rebound from an earlier pit-road penalty. Elliott, who entered the day beneath the cutline, is safely into the next round.Who’s hotKurt Busch. All the Stewart-Haas Racing cars had speed, but Busch ran the cleanest race. As a result, he gained 15 more points of cushion above the cutline to stand 21 points to the good. His fifth-place finish at Dover also gave him the tiebreaker over Brad Keselowski, who finished 14th, so Busch is ahead of Keselowski and in sixth place in the standings.Kevin Harvick. Harvick had some pit-road issues to work through, but the No. 4 regained its dominance by leading 286 of the 404 laps and fighting back for a sixth-place finish. Harvick overtook Kyle Busch for the top spot in the standings and picked up two more playoff points by winning the first two stages.Who’s notClint Bowyer. Bowyer was primed for a second straight top-five finish, but a loose wheel brought him to pit road in the final stage. Later, a flat tire led to him smashing the wall on Lap 391 of 404. Bowyer finished in 35th place, the worst of the playoff drivers, and now he’s beneath the cutline. Amazing for a driver who looked like he was in position to be a legit Championship 4 contender for much of this race.WATCH: Bowyer blows tire, wrecks laterAric Almirola. Almirola was in position for his first win in 148 races, but a call for four tires put the No. 10 Ford in sixth place going into a late restart. Perhaps feeling desperate to gain ground on that restart, Almirola made contact with Brad Keselowski and ignited a wreck that also collected Alex Bowman and Martin Truex Jr. among playoff drivers. Almirola fought back and finished 13th and actually gained points on the cutline, but coming close to a win and not getting it had to be heartbreaking. Can he bounce back?WATCH: Almirola triggers wreck BUBBLE WATCH 10.Clint Bowyer-10 12.Alex Bowman-34 Next raceThe Monster Energy Series travels to Talladega Superspeedway for a Sunday race on Oct. 14 (2 p.m. ET, NBC, MRN, SiriusXM NASCAR Radio). It is the penultimate race in the Round of 12.Who it favors/hurtsFavors: Team Penske drivers Brad Keselowski (five) and Joey Logano (three) have combined for eight wins at Talladega and they’ve had recent success there, too, by taking five of the past six checkered flags. Keselowski, who won this race last year, has led the most laps in the past five races at the 2.66-mile track, while Logano, who won the spring race this year, has led the most laps in the past three races there.Hurts: Martin Truex Jr. and Kyle Larson both have an average finish of 21.3 at Talladega, but Truex has raced at Talladega 27 times to Larson’s nine, thus a larger sample size. Truex can’t even hang his hat on good recent performances, either, as he’s finished 23rd or worse in his last four trips to Talladega. The only playoff driver with a worse average finish at Talladega than Truex and Larson is Alex Bowman at 27.3, but he’s coming off an eighth-place performance in the spring. Plus, four of his first six races here weren’t in Hendrick-quality cars, perhaps skewing his numbers.last_img read more

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APA: Majority Of Adults Stressed By Mass Shootings

first_imgAPA News: WASHINGTON, D.C. — A large majority of adults in the United States are stressed by mass shootings, and a third of U.S. adults say that fear of mass shootings stops them from going to certain places and events, according to a new survey on stress and mass shootings by the American Psychological Association.  Methodology Hispanic adults (32%) are more likely than white non-Hispanic adults (15%) to say they experience stress often or constantly related to the possibility of a mass shooting. Hispanic adults and African American adults also are more likely than white non-Hispanic adults to say they do not know how to cope with the stress they feel as a result of mass shootings (44% of Hispanic adults and 43% of African American adults vs. 30% of white adults). Black adults are more likely to feel that they or someone they know will be a victim of a mass shooting (60% compared with 41% of white adults and 50% of Hispanic adults). For additional information on stress and behavioral health, visit www.apa.org/helpcenter. Join the conversation about stress on Twitter by following @APA and #stressAPA.  To download related graphics, and for information on managing distress in the aftermath of a mass shooting, visit www.stressinamerica.org. Women report feeling stressed more often than men about the possibility of a shooting (85% vs. 71%), and parents of children under the age of 18 are nearly twice as likely as those without children under 18 to say they experience stress often or constantly because of the possibility of a mass shooting (28% vs.16%). Further, 62% of parents say they “live in fear that their children will be victims of a mass shooting”.  The survey found that more than three-quarters of adults (79%) in the U.S. say they experience stress as a result of the possibility of a mass shooting. Additionally, many adults report that they are changing their behavior due to fear of mass shootings. Nearly one in three adults (32%) feel they cannot go anywhere without worrying about being a victim of a mass shooting, while just about the same number (33%) say fear prevents them from going to certain places or events. Nearly one-quarter (24%) of adults report changing how they live their lives because of fear of a mass shooting.  All sample surveys and polls, whether or not they use probability sampling, are subject to multiple sources of error that are most often not possible to quantify or estimate, including sampling error, coverage error, error associated with nonresponse, error associated with question wording and response options, and post-survey weighting and adjustments. Therefore, the words “margin of error” are avoided, as they are misleading. All that can be calculated are different possible sampling errors with different probabilities for pure, unweighted, random samples with 100% response rates. These are only theoretical because no published polls come close to this ideal.center_img “It’s clear that mass shootings are taking a toll on our mental health, and we should be particularly concerned that they are affecting the way many of us are living our daily lives,” said Arthur C. Evans Jr., PhD, APA’s chief executive officer. “The more these events happen in places where people can see themselves frequenting, the greater the mental health impact will be. We don’t have to experience these events directly for them to affect us. Simply hearing about them can have an emotional impact, and this can have negative repercussions for our mental and physical health.” The results of this survey come in advance of the findings of APA’s annual Stress in America™ survey, which will be released this fall. To better understand the impact of mass shootings on stress and health in the aftermath of the recent tragic El Paso and Dayton shootings, APA commissioned the nationally representative survey. It was conducted online by The Harris Poll between Aug. 8 and 12 among 2,017 adults ages 18 and older who reside in the U.S.  This survey was conducted online within the United States between Aug. 8 and 12, 2019, among 2,017 U.S. adults (ages 18 and older) by The Harris Poll on behalf of the American Psychological Association via its Harris On Demand omnibus product. Figures for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, region and household income were weighted where necessary to bring them into line with their actual proportions in the population. Propensity score weighting was used to adjust for respondents’ propensity to be online. When asked which places they are stressed about the possibility of a mass shooting occurring, adults most commonly say a public event (53%), mall (50%), school or university (42%) or movie theater (38%), with only one in five (21%) saying they never experience stress as a result of the possibility of a mass shooting. Respondents for this survey were selected from among those who have agreed to participate in our surveys. The data have been weighted to reflect the composition of the adult population. Because the sample is based on those who agreed to participate in the online panel, no estimates of theoretical sampling error can be calculated.  “Mass shootings are a public health issue, and we need to take a comprehensive public health approach to understand and devise lasting policy solutions,” Evans said. “It is important that people and policymakers realize that this is not an insurmountable issue; it is something we have the power to change.”  last_img read more

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