Mount Everest record holder out to conquer business

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWhicker: John Jackson greets a Christmas that he wasn’t sure he’d see160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SALT LAKE CITY — In the climbing world, Apa Sherpa is at the peak. He has conquered Mount Everest 16 times, a record matched by no one, and even reached the 29,028-foot summit without oxygen on four of those trips. “He is the Tiger Woods of climbing,” friend Jerry Mika said. Now the valley below Utah’s Wasatch Mountains is Sherpa’s new home. He has left Nepal to start a life in business and give his children a shot at a better education. He and his family arrived in the United States with assistance from political and business leaders, including an outdoor-clothing executive. Sherpa also is driven by a deep desire to improve the lives of others, especially in his native land. “There’s so much this man has to tell from the stories of his life,” said Mika, who met Sherpa in 2003 while working for a Seattle-based clothing maker. “Western climbers go up Everest one time and come back and get their book deals,” Mika said, but he called climbers like Sherpa “the true unsung heroes, and that’s what I want to help him bring out.” The word “sherpa” means “people from the East.” Years ago, English climbers used it as a nickname for local men who hauled climbing gear up Nepal’s mountains. The nickname eventually morphed into a commonly used surname, Mika explained. Sherpa, 47, is shy and slight, even when enveloped in a puffy down jacket. He and Mika are partners at Karma Outdoor Clothing Co., a retail store in Salt Lake City. He also is working on his English with the hope of becoming a motivational speaker. Mika quit his job last summer to help Sherpa relocate. “He was asking me, ‘Jerry, can you help me? My children are getting older; time is running out.’ I couldn’t sleep at night,” Mika said. So he bought a plane ticket for Sherpa and went to work finding others to help. Outdoor-industry friends and climbers have been generous. Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman was among dozens who wrote letters to speed up the immigration process. Sherpa’s family — wife Yangjin, 42, sons Tenjing, 21, and Pemba, 15, and daughter Dawa, 11 — arrived Tuesday. Someone has offered to pay Tenjing’s tuition at the University of Utah, and Yangjin will help run a tea house at Snowbird ski resort. Such kindness “will change my life,” said Sherpa, who speaks broken English. It could also change lives in Thame, Nepal, the community he left behind. Thame’s 600 residents live in the shadow of Everest. Thame children have one school, and classes end after seventh grade. Sherpa hopes to earn enough money to build a school in Thame for teenagers and even pay teachers’ salaries. “Then they can choose, climbing or something else,” he said. Sherpa reached the Everest summit in 1990 with Peter Hillary, the son of Sir Edmund Hillary, who was among the first climbers to the top in 1953. Pete Athens also hit the summit that day 16 years ago and has returned six times. He praised Sherpa for “his great heart, his great humility and his incredible skills as an athlete.” Sherpa’s last trip to the top was May 16. “Every time is hard and too risky,” he said. “The mother goddess of Everest saved my life.” Mika said Sherpa is bewildered by dozens of Web sites where his accomplishments are noted. “He is so humble. He will never tell you about his records,” Mika said. Sherpa, who grins and giggles easily, said records are not important. “More important,” he said, “is to help other people.”last_img read more

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How DCIM Aligns CIOs, IT and Facilities Teams on Same Path

first_imgThis article originally appeared on www.datacenterfrontier.com and has been republished with permission of the author. It’s been said that today’s data center is the railroad infrastructure of our Digital Age and that the world’s business travels along its rails. As we witness the proliferation of Big Data analytics and the advent of IoT, Artificial Intelligence and Machine-to-Machine (M2M) technologies across the enterprise, the metaphor has never been more appropriate as organizations pursue their digital transformation.To embrace these game-changing technologies and their potential to transform the data center from a cost center into a strategic vehicle that increases business agility and profitability, it is in the mutual interest of the data center manager, facilities staff and C-suite executive to work together to satisfy their many overlapping business requirements by the most cost-effective means possible. But in many enterprises, the CIO, IT and data center facilities teams work separately and with little communication.This failure to communicate, compounded by data center environments that may be hamstrung with legacy equipment, often leads to conflict — avoidable conflicts, as we shall see. For example, the IT department, which is rarely responsible for the data center’s electric bill, may not be aware of how their activities are impacting a facility’s power expenditures. And since they lack transparency into how much power they are using, they may fail to enable power management and cooling options.This lack of insight gives IT organizations less incentive to operate their data center environment more efficiently, and the gap between IT and facilities can result in lower productivity, slowed service deployment, inefficient equipment, lost revenue, increased expenses and unscheduled downtime.It’s these last two points that should give the C-suite executive pause. According to the Ponemon Institute, the cost of an unplanned data center outage is now approximately $9,000 per minute. North American businesses alone collectively lose $26.5 billion each year due to IT downtime and data recovery. As for OpEx, Gartner predicts that by 2020, data centers in the United States alone will require six times the electricity consumed by New York City in a single year. As we all know, energy costs continue to be the fastest-rising expense for today’s data centers.Towards the Goal of Digital Transformation with an Eye on the Bottom LineWith out-of-the-box support that allows you to painlessly save on CapEx and OpEx, Intel Data Center Manager (DCM) is the easiest way to modernize your data center, providing complete visibility and control as well as remote management. Intel DCM’s intelligent software provides real-time power and thermal consumption data, lending the clarity that IT staff needs to lower power usage and increase rack density to maximize the full value of infrastructure. Additionally, by monitoring for component failures before they can create a problem, downtime is minimized and data center managers can continue or prolong operations during power outages.Intel Data Center Manager provides power and thermal monitoring and management for servers, racks, and groups of servers in data centers. By using existing servers as wireless sensors and analyzing the data they already collect, these data-driven insights enable business users to achieve the performance levels they require.Intel DCM is hardware agnostic, leveraging firmware capabilities present within most modern #servers.”Intel DCM is hardware agnostic, leveraging firmware capabilities present within most modern servers. The key advantage is that data center managers working with legacy equipment, who want the benefit of granular power monitoring but also to avoid the prohibitive extra cost of installing intelligent power strips and UPSs, can monitor the active components that really matter.Intel DCM enables data centers to leverage investments in systems already present, lower costs by optimizing power and cooling resources and minimize costly downtime. And by this means, enterprise CIOs, IT and facilities teams can finally start down the same track more confidently, and with a shared vision as they pursue their organization’s digital transformation.last_img read more

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Tamed Eagles aim to fly high

first_img“We just have to play a lot better and play much closer to what we’re capable of,” he added.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next “We have to accept the humility of the scenario, we have to get back to understanding what we do well, and sort of rediscover who we are,” said Baldwin, moments after emerging from the Ateneo dugout at Smart Araneta Coliseum on Sunday night.“It’s there, there’s no question that it’s still there. But today I thought we played like a young team, and we shouldn’t. Yes, there’s youth there, but we’ve been together long enough and we shouldn’t play like a young team. We have to figure it out.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingThe Tamaraws seemed to have the Eagles all figured out as they started strong and finished even stronger to send their Final Four matchup to a do-or-die affair this Wednesday at Mall of Asia Arena.While Baldwin acknowledged FEU’s brilliance, the American coach said the defeat was also due to his players lacking confidence with their shots. MRT 7 on track for partial opening in 2021 Two weeks ago, Ateneo was flirting with a perfect UAAP Season 80 elimination round and an outright finals berth.But two successive losses, including a 67-80 defeat to Far Eastern U in the Final Four, has put the Blue Eagles’ impressive campaign in peril, a scenario which coach Tab Baldwin said is humbling for his team.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Cash incentive, more allowance await world champ Tabora The Fatted Calf and Ayutthaya: New restos worth the drive to Tagaytay Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’center_img Baldwin said his team shot “abysmally” in contrast to the Tamaraws, whom he described as “sharper on both ends of the floor.”Ateneo shot just 36 percent from the field, including 31 percent from beyond the arc.For a team that hardly showed any weakness in the elimination round, the sputtering performance by the Eagles came as a surprise.“I think FEU played real well,” he said. “They had a good game plan, we shot the ball just abysmally. We had open shots particularly in the first half, and we didn’t hit them. I think our confidence kind of went down, and I hate to see that because with young kids, you don’t ever want to see their confidence sort of erode a little bit.”Baldwin feels this type of adversity will only strengthen his players, saying he can already feel the urgency within the team.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Jordan delivers on promise: 2 Cobra choppers now in PH Malditas save PH from shutout After 30 years, Johnlu Koa still doing ‘hard-to-make’ quality breads Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

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$13.9 Billion Issued Into Circulation for Week Leading Up to Christmas

first_imgThe Bank of Jamaica’s (BoJ) says total currency issued into circulation for the week leading up the Christmas holidays, from December 17 to 21, amounted to $13.9 billion.This, it noted, represents a 12.2 per cent increase in the currency stock for the week, and was broadly in line with the $13.5 billion or 13.9 per cent increase for the corresponding period in 2017.The BoJ, in a statement on Monday (December 24), said the currency issue for the review week represents a net increase of $18.1 billion or 16.5 per cent for the month, to December 21.Additionally, the Bank said the increase is marginally higher than the projected $17.1 billion or 15.5 per cent expansion for the periodAs at December 21, total currency issued amounted to $126.1 billion, reflecting an annual nominal 16.4 per cent increase, as against 16 per cent for the corresponding period in 2017.“When the forecasted change in the general level of consumer prices is taken into account, the estimated real growth in currency for the period is 11.2 per cent, which is above the real growth of 10.2 per cent for the same period of the previous year,” the Bank’s statement further indicated.The BoJ informed last week that the amount of money expected to be in circulation is projected to increase by $18.1 billion to $128.1 billion.The increase is deemed broadly in line with increased consumer activity over the festive period.last_img read more

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Feds to test limits of Indigenous housing ideas through new contest

first_imgThe Canadian PressThe Trudeau Liberals are offering Indigenous communities $30 million in prize money as part of a contest that could end up rewriting the rules about how the federal government funds badly needed housing on-reserve.Key to the contest is to draw in private sector builders to help finance the construction and repairing of homes in First Nations, Inuit and Metis communities.The Liberals have made overtures to the private sector to help cover the cost for on-reserve infrastructure to close the estimated $30 billion needed to repair and upgrade homes, roads, and water systems.Now they’re looking for new ideas to test.Indigenous Services Minister Jane Philpott said government funding alone can’t surmount the scale of the housing problem and suggested federal spending rules can get in the way.She said the contest will help suss out needed policy changes for projects and ideas that aren’t easily permitted under existing funding rules, such as mixed-used projects that combine residential and commercial space.“Going along with business as usual is not going to close that (housing) gap quickly,” she said in an interview ahead of Tuesday’s scheduled announcement.“This is an opportunity to say, perhaps we need to change some of the approach _ how can we, in fact, be smarter about the money that we’re spending.”More details about the program will be announced this fall at the open of applications for the prize money. The winnings will be awarded over three rounds starting in spring 2019.The contest is the latest in a string of challenges the Liberals have launched since coming to office in November 2015, aiming to reshape how funding recipients think about projects and how the government spends money.What the government is looking for out of the contest is to fund projects that can be replicated in other communities, bring back traditional Indigenous building styles and techniques, and create an economic boost for communities that could include sourcing materials locally or providing job training to young people.“This is an opportunity to say ‘if you have an idea of how you can actually address the social problem and at the same time provide housing space’ then these are the kinds of things we would like to support,” Philpott said.“Once you can demonstrate proof of concept, often that will be the trigger that it will take for others to be able to scale up those examples.”A report in May from the Indigenous caucus of the Canadian Housing and Renewal Association said that some 118,500 Indigenous households, or 18.3 per cent, lived in “core housing need,” meaning they lived in homes that stretched them financially, required hefty repairs, or were too small for their families.The Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. reported in late June that some 1.6 million homes, or 13.6 per cent of all urban households, were in core housing need in 2016, a figure relatively unchanged from 2015.Spending from the Liberals’ first budget in 2016 has, as of the end of March, paid for the construction and renovation of 8,786 homes, the government said, with work underway on 5,178 units.The Liberals’ 2018 budget set aside a combined $900 million over the next decade for housing in Metis and Inuit communities, and a further $600 million over three years for work in First Nations communities.last_img read more

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