We Want the Redhead! New Pirates of the Caribbean Dress and Purse

first_imgShare This!One of the most iconic animatronics at Walt Disney World is the feisty redhead in the auction scene of Pirates of the Caribbean. Now Disney is out with a Pirates Redhead dress and we are absolutely here for it. The $128.00 price is in line with the other themed adult dresses that have been offered recently. The fabric is substantial – this dress is heavy! It features a fun pirate woman and skeleton boarder along the bottom of the skirt. We found the dress on Main Street in the Magic Kingdom. It is also available at Cherry Tree Lane in Disney Springs. We’re not yet seeing the dress on shopDisney.com, but we’re hopeful that it will appear there eventually. Photos: Christina HarrisonIs this your next purchase for cosplay? Would you wear it out in the evening? Let us know in the comments. Adding to the awesome is the accompanying treasure chest purse, $85.00, that has a red skull lining. last_img read more

Read More

Comment of the Day: Semantic Marketing

first_imgToday’s winning comment comes from Alex Iskold’s must-read post Semantic Web Patterns: A Guide to Semantic Technologies. In the post Alex identifies the patterns that are beginning to emerge in the Semantic Web, classifies the different trends, and examines what the future holds. One of the comments to the post introduced us to the term “semantic marketing”. Scott Brinker is curious about “how marketing will evolve to take advantage of the semantic web, whether it’s in consumer or B2B plays.”Scott lists 7 possible missions for semantic marketing, leading with: “Marketing becomes the champion of generating the underlying data.” (hmmm, that’s similar to the issue of content management on corporate Intranets!). Here is Scott’s full list of suggestions for semantic marketing, which you can also read here:For participating in the discussion, Scott you’ve won a $30 Amazon voucher – courtesy of our competition sponsors AdaptiveBlue and their Netflix Queue Widget.Great post.One of the questions I find most fascinating is how marketing will evolve to take advantage of the semantic web, whether it’s in consumer or B2B plays. I think this is more than a linear extension of how marketers have been optimizing the web today, but something qualitatively different. I suggest that SEO + Semantic Web = SEO++ (after all, it is sort of an object-oriented paradigm shift).Here are 7 possible missions for “semantic marketing”:1. Marketing becomes the champion of generating the underlying data.2. Marketing views categorization, metadata, RDF graphs, relevant microformats, etc., as a new kind of market positioning and placement — “semantic branding”, if you will.3. Marketing takes a much broader view of distribution and promotion of its semantic web data in search engines and vertical networks (SEO++), including the sponsorship or creation of new niche semantic networks.4. Marketing comes up with new ways to incentivize the conversion of semantic web interactions in real business objectives.5. Marketing will have a real challenge with tracking and attributing distributed data in the semantic web to measure its impact — from multi-touch marketing to micro-touch marketing. Hard problem but entrepreneurial ingenuity will prevail.6. Marketing will want to leverage other people’s data in their own value-add mash-ups (interesting “joint venture” semantic data partnerships), as well as for internal-only apps focused on market research and competitive intelligence.7. Marketing will need to be concerned with brand protection in the semantic web: quality control to watch for bad data, conflicting data, competitive misuse, etc.If you’re interested, http://www.chiefmartec.com/2008/03/marketing-in-th.html is the full post. Would love feedback from other marketers and semantic web afficionados. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting richard macmanus A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Tags:#Contests#web center_img Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Read More

Quick guidelines for getting users info they need in chatbots

first_imgQuick guidelines for getting users info they need in chatbotsYou are here: Image from Reve MarketingIt’s best to think of a text-based chatbot as an “automated customer service rep.”That’s the advice from Kaye Chapman, learning and development manager at digital engagement platform Comm100. As a conversational format sometimes assisted by AI, chatbots provide a different opportunity for marketers than, say, the structure and presentation of information in pages or screens for websites or mobile apps.Conversations, not pagesIf you think of a chatbot as just a “website with interaction,” she said, you don’t focus on the ways it can lead to your desired outcome, which might be making a sale or resolving a customer’s issue.A web page presents a chunk of info that users find through navigational clicks or a site search, whereas a text-based chatbot presents information in small bites based on inputs from the user; it’s a different kind of information gathering and requires a different presentation.Because of that central difference, it’s important to keep a chatbot’s information hierarchy relatively simple and shallow, said Vivek Lakshman, co-founder and VP of products at Reve Marketing, which offers chatbot creation and deployment.Minimum before choicesLakshman suggests that a marketer’s operational question in designing chatbot information flow should be: What is the minimal relevancy of input before presenting choices?In other words: If you ask a chatbot for shoes, you should quickly see shoe choices.One way to flatten the hierarchy, he said, is to group products in ways they may not be grouped on a site, followed by a drilldown. Shoes might be included in a new, higher level of “footwear,” for instance, that includes shoes, sneakers, boots, socks and so on.Another way to flatten the drilldown is to determine the user’s persona and need up front via queries from the chatbot, instead of assuming the user’s persona will reveal itself through choices.A different kind of personaWebsite information designers, of course, frequently create profiles of targeted users, called personas, in order to determine their approaches and needs. One persona, for example, might be a mother of small children, while another is a male senior citizen. The typical information quests of each user type is then taken into account in deciding how the information is grouped, structured and reached by menus or site search.But a chatbot can simply ask up front: how old are you and what are you looking for? This establishes the persona and need immediately, so that end-result choices can be presented more quickly. It’s a different kind of choice tree.Conversational flow also means that a marketer can inject highlighted information at specific times in the interaction that might increase their impact. A daily special, for instance, doesn’t need to be on the site home page or in a pop-up window, but can be injected into the conversational flow at opportune moments, such as when it seems the user’s answers point away from a purchase.Different background info for chatbotsNot all chatbot interaction is created equal, of course. In addition to such obvious differences as the quality of any assisting AI, there’s also the basic fact of differences in how much is known about a user.A chatbot where a user has logged on with credentials from a brand website, for instance, will likely have more brand-related purchase history on the user than, say, a chatbot on Facebook Messenger, where the user is logged on with Facebook credentials.Text-based chatbots can be an integral part of a brand’s marketing and customer service team, if brand information is designed for the particular requirements of this delivery mechanism.If not, users can get wary of using chatbots that are less efficient than other means in helping them find what they are looking for — even if the idea of chatting initially seems more engaging.This story first appeared on MarTech Today. For more on marketing technology, click here.The post Quick guidelines for getting users info they need in chatbots appeared first on Marketing Land.From our sponsors: Quick guidelines for getting users info they need in chatbots HomeDigital MarketingQuick guidelines for getting users info they need in chatbots Posted on 31st October 2018Digital Marketing FacebookshareTwittertweetGoogle+share Related postsLytics now integrates with Google Marketing Platform to enable customer data-informed campaigns14th December 2019The California Consumer Privacy Act goes live in a few short weeks — Are you ready?14th December 2019ML 2019121313th December 2019Global email benchmark report finds email isn’t dead – it’s essential13th December 20192019 benchmark report: brand vs. non-brand traffic in Google Shopping12th December 2019Keep your LinkedIn advertising strategy focused in 202012th December 2019last_img read more

Read More