Sixty Community Facilitators Trained in Restorative Justice

first_imgSixty Community Facilitators Trained in Restorative Justice JusticeFebruary 21, 2014Written by: Shelly-Ann Irving Photo: JIS PhotographerGraduates of the Restorative Justice facilitators training programme, undertaken by the Ministry of Justice, at the graduation ceremony held recently, at the Altamont Court Hotel, St. Andrew. Sixty Jamaicans have been equipped to implement and monitor the principles and practices of restorative justice (RJ) in their communities, having graduated from a training programme developed and executed by the RJ Unit in the Ministry of Justice.The four-month training course consisting 11 modules was undertaken from June to September, 2013, and sought to build the capacity of the facilitators to competently, confidently and safely conduct RJ processes in keeping with the National Restorative Justice Policy.Minister of Justice, Senator the Hon. Mark Golding, in his address at the graduation ceremony held on February 19 at the Altamont Court Hotel, St. Andrew, congratulated the community facilitators.He said that they have made a bold step by volunteering to assist with the implementation of RJ in Jamaica.“The RJ facilitators have given their time and energy to this important programme. The expertise they will develop as RJ practitioners will contribute to the healing of fractured relationships in their communities. This will effectively and collectively reduce the levels of crime and violence that now afflict our nation,” Senator Golding said.He encouraged persons, who are not yet a part of the programme, “to give serious consideration to offering yourselves as RJ facilitators.”“It takes a committed and vested citizenry as well as civil society, non-Government Organisations, the church and others, to find their respective role in the process of reconciliation and peace,” Senator Golding said.The Ministry of Justice is observing Restorative Justice Week from February 9 to 28 under the theme: ‘Restorative Justice as a catalyst for unity, healing and transformation’.During the period of observation, the Ministry will seek to raise awareness and build support for the RJ Programme as well as invite national participation and collaboration with the Government in implementing this model of justice.RJ week was officially launched with a church service on Sunday, February 9 at the Emmanuel Apostolic in Kingston.Other activities for the week include an International Conference on February 21, which will feature Restorative Justice Experts from the United States, Canada and Brazil. RelatedJamaicans Urged To Fight Against Human Trafficking Story HighlightsSixty Jamaicans have been equipped to implement and monitor the principles and practices of restorative justice (RJ) in their communities.The four-month training course sought to build the capacity of the facilitators to competently, confidently and safely conduct RJ processes.Minister of Justice, Senator the Hon. Mark Golding encouraged persons, who are not yet a part of the programme, “to give serious consideration to offering yourselves as RJ facilitators.” Sixty Community Facilitators Trained in Restorative JusticeJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlaycenter_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail RelatedFull Implementation of Criminal Case Management Must Be Achieved – Chief Justice RelatedSenate Passes Amendments to Companies Act Advertisementslast_img read more

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Why Scientific Polarization? A Case Study

first_imgJane Goodall Meets the God Hypothesis Intelligent Design Why Scientific Polarization? A Case StudyDavid [email protected]_klinghofferDecember 7, 2018, 10:01 AM Evolution Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share Origin of Life: Brian Miller Distills a Debate Between Dave Farina and James Tour TagsAlex BerezowAllen Steerealternative universeschronic Lyme diseaseclimate changeCNNEuropean Journal for Philosophy of ScienceevolutionFox Newsintelligent designLyme diseasemathematical modelneo-Darwinian theorypolarizationPoliticsscientistsstrengths and weaknessestheistic evolution,Trending Congratulations to Science Magazine for an Honest Portrayal of Darwin’s Descent of Man Recommendedcenter_img Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share Share “A Summary of the Evidence for Intelligent Design”: The Study Guide Here’s a scientific war that’s rending the fabric of polite disagreement. Scientists are divided against themselves, choosing sides in a highly polarized environment, charging each other’s “lobby” with denying or distorting evidence.As the European Journal for Philosophy of Science summarizes, “The two sides of the controversy have never seen eye to eye, but over the past decade, the accusations and counter accusations have become increasingly belligerent and entrenched.” It’s not merely a scientific but a “legal and political battleground.”Yes, it’s the bitter scientific dispute over…evolution? Nope. Climate change? No, silly, over Lyme disease! Debate and Death ThreatsThe specific issue is the existence and treatment of “chronic Lyme disease.” Our friend Alex Berezow at the American Council on Science and Health notes, “The man who discovered Lyme disease, Allen Steere, was skeptical of the chronic Lyme diagnosis as well as long-term antibiotic therapy. So, he started receiving death threats from patients who were convinced he was wrong.” The aforementioned journal article takes this debate, previously unknown to me, as a model of how disagreement arises even among scientists — you know, those models of cool, rational deliberation — and tends increasingly toward irrational polarization. Berezow writes:The authors employ a mathematical model to show that, even when scientists are acting in good faith over the correct interpretation of evidence, polarization is still a likely outcome. How so?Suppose a scientist believes that Hypothesis X is more likely to be correct than Hypothesis Y. He may perhaps come to believe that other scientists who also accept Hypothesis X are slightly more reliable than scientists who accept Hypothesis Y. Over time, this slight initial bias against data provided by scientists who believe Hypothesis Y can morph into outright distrust. Once that happens, a stable state of polarization develops, in which neither side can “win” the debate, even if the facts clearly support one hypothesis over the other.The authors reach a rather disturbing conclusion:“We do not need to suppose that anyone is a bad researcher (in our models all agents are identical), or that they are bought by industry, or even that they engage in something like confirmation bias or other forms of motivated reasoning to see communities with stable scientific polarization emerge. All it takes is some mistrust in the data of those who hold different beliefs to get scientific polarization.”In other words, everybody acting in good faith can result in a society in which we cannot agree on a common set of facts.Berezow cites the parallel of our contemporary political scene where Left and Right often appear not just to hold different opinions but to live in alternative universes. You can compare these, dizzyingly, by switching rapidly back and forth between Fox News and CNN.Strengths and WeaknessesI would add that the evolution debate presents another illustration, equally stark. Berezow again: “Over time, this slight initial bias against data provided by scientists who believe Hypothesis Y can morph into outright distrust. Once that happens, a stable state of polarization develops, in which neither side can ‘win’ the debate, even if the facts clearly support one hypothesis over the other.”I honestly don’t think that most advocates of intelligent design are unable to recognize merits in the other side’s case. If we were unable, we wouldn’t speak of the alternative neo-Darwinian theory’s “strengths and weaknesses.” Yes, it has strengths. In explaining the emergence of biological novelties, the choice between Darwin and design is not a no-brainer.This most sound unfair if you know little about the evolution debate. However, from long experience, I do believe that many evolution proponents are so committed to their view with its unacknowledged philosophical underpinnings, so mistrustful of other interpretations, that arguing with them is likely a waste of time. A friend explained recently that this appears to be so, not least, with theistic evolutionists of a certain profile. See “No Escape from Theistic Evolution?” When we do argue with these people, the purpose is not to convince them, which is probably hopeless, but to persuade the unpersuaded who, we know, are listening or reading.Photo credit: Brian Stansberry [CC BY 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons. Requesting a (Partial) Retraction from Darrel Falk and BioLogos A Physician Describes How Behe Changed His MindLife’s Origin — A “Mystery” Made AccessibleCodes Are Not Products of PhysicsIxnay on the Ambriancay PlosionexhayDesign Triangulation: My Thanksgiving Gift to Alllast_img read more

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Minnesota has first road test tonight in Cedar Falls

first_imgMinnesota has first road test tonight in Cedar Falls Mark HeiseNovember 13, 2007Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintIf Northern Iowa’s convincing 72-58 win over Colorado State is any indication of how the Panthers’ season will go, the low-scoring Minnesota women’s basketball team might be in trouble tonight.But it shouldn’t be an indicator, as Colorado State is more of another Australian national team than an Ohio State powerhouse.So when Minnesota (1-0 overall, 0-0 Big Ten) tips off at 7 p.m. tonight against Northern Iowa (1-0, 0-0 Missouri Valley) to begin the team’s first away game of the season, the Gophers should be favored.But coach Pam Borton said the team wasn’t taking anything for granted.“We’re not taking anybody lightly,” she said. “We’re not in a position to do that yet. This is just our first road game, so we’ll find out what we’re all about here.”Rebounding was a big part of Minnesota’s success against UC-Riverside last weekend, and it should be a factor again, as the Panthers have just one player taller than 6 feet 1 inch, and barely out-rebounded Colorado State in their last matchup.“This will be a good test for us,” sophomore forward Ashley Ellis-Milan said. “Rebounding and defense are the two key factors for us, and I’m pretty confident that we’ll be able to overcome whatever Northern Iowa throws at us.”Minnesota might be a defensive-minded team, but it will have to find ways to put up more points, as the Gophers only scored 57 in their season opener. “We’re getting good shots, our players are doing a good job of crashing the boards and getting second chances. Now we just need to finish,” sophomore guard Brittany McCoy said. “We work so hard sometimes to get a good shot or an offensive board, and then we just throw those opportunities away. That’s something we’ve been focusing on getting away from.”Northern Iowa is starting three freshmen in a young lineup, but is led by sophomore guard Danielle Wubbens, who scored a team-high 14 points in the season opener.Senior forward Megan Keefe averaged 9.2 points per game last year and is the only returning player to average more than four points per game at the college level over a full season.“We talked about going out hungry because Northern Iowa does have freshmen starting, and we know how it was last year, playing against more experienced teams,” McCoy said. “So we’re going to go in there knowing that this is a game we can and should win, and we’re going to take care of business.”Minnesota, meanwhile, has 81 percent of its scoring back for this season, and if the defense creates the turnovers it has so far this year, the Gophers have the ability to put up a lot of points in a hurry, as they did against Riverside, transitioning quickly from defense to offense for easy baskets.But Borton said the main goal was to work on improving the team, listing everything from half-court offensive sets to defensive breakdown, to rebounding as things that needed improvement in the coming months.“Everything that involves the game of basketball, we’re working on,” she said. “We’re still working on fundamentals and breaking down different things so we can become better at it. I don’t think we’re great at anything right now.”last_img read more

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Low-carbon plan a reality with Prisk on board

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

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Date says coaching not part future plans

first_img GET THE BEST OF THE JAPAN TIMES When life resumes its normal course, the 46-year-old knows she would like to act as a sports ambassador and help tennis occupy a predominant place in the country, but she is not sure whether she will ever choose a career in coaching.“Am I going to be coaching? This topic has come up a numerous times, even before I decided to retire. Being an athlete, I’ve experienced firsthand and know what a tough job being a coach is,” Date said.“Depending on the age of the player, your coaching strategy is different. If I were to coach, I would have to learn a lot because playing is different from describing how to play in words to other people. At this point, coaching is not part of my future plans.”Though she might not see coaching as a calling, Date has done her share of mentoring to younger female tennis players, including Kurumi Nara, Risa Ozaki and Nao Hibino, who have all been ranked inside the WTA’s top 100.It is no wonder fans are hoping to see her return to the court as coach after a first career that ended when she was 26 and seemingly at her peak, and a second that lasted nine and a half years, through which Date proved she is well qualified for a post-athletic career in coaching.But in her mind, all signs are pointing in different directions.“So if not coaching, what do I want to do? When I look at Japan, the environment for the sport of tennis is not perfect. The Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics are coming up so I believe the world of sports will change going forward, but it’s not just about the Olympics,” Date said.“We have Kei Nishikori who is one of the iconic men’s players and he is one pillar in tennis right now, but I want the sport of tennis to be much more deeply rooted in Japan, so that tennis isn’t just a tentative thing but a long-term established sport in Japan.”In order for that to happen, Date says improvements in facilities and software are needed, and these are areas she feels she can contribute by sharing her insight and experience.Date, who underwent knee surgery in April last year, said she got used to playing through pain after 41, when she felt like she suddenly hit the age barrier and needed more than a good night’s rest to recover from pain and fatigue.She feels like if she had the medicine, science and technology available to players today when she started her career — with a wooden racket — her first career would have lasted longer.But when she looks back at what she was able to accomplish, even without modern-day conveniences, she is proud to know she was able to age gracefully as a player, standing on the court until the very end and playing her game until the last minutes.Knowing how demanding a tennis player’s life can be with a very short offseason and hardly any break between tournaments, Date had to make a point about the tremendous pressure fans put on athletes like former world No. 4 Nishikori, which can be both a privilege and a burden.“I think it’s an extraordinary achievement for him to be in the top five considering his height and build. I know that some people think that his goal should be to become a Grand Slam champion, but I think he deserves credit for what he has already accomplished,” Date said.“I’m not saying he’s satisfied with his current situation, but please be reminded that he now has a wrist injury. All athletes, no matter how young, struggle with injury and even (world No. 1 Rafael) Nadal had to leave the tour with a knee injury. So I want everyone to understand how difficult it is to maintain one’s position.”When asked how she was able to become one of the few Japanese survivors in top-level tennis, Date said for her, like with every player she has seen at the top, hating to lose is a bigger factor than loving to win.“When I was 18 my coach told me to quit if I’m not able to participate in the Grand Slam within a year. I had just started my career and I didn’t understand anything about professional tennis then, but I believed I had to get there,” Date said.“It’s really that strong will that brought me there. It’s about having a goal. And to continue to win, I believe you have to have a strong hatred of losing. That’s the secret. People think I was born a champion but that’s not true. I placed third in the very first tournament I competed in when I was eight. I would always lose and cry as a child. But I’ve always hated to lose,” she said. IN FIVE EASY PIECES WITH TAKE 5 Kimiko Date KEYWORDScenter_img RELATED PHOTOS Former world No. 4 Kimiko Date said Wednesday she has yet to give life after sport a serious thought, as she is still going back and forth between strange emptiness and ecstatic relief now that she has retired from competitive tennis.“There’s a sentiment of sadness but at the same time, I’m relieved that I don’t have to worry about my condition every morning when I wake up. I do feel reassured and liberated,” said Date, who ended her career with a straight-sets loss at the recent Japan Women’s Open. Kimiko Date speaks during a news conference at the Foreign Correspondents’ Club of Japan on Wednesday. | KYODOlast_img read more

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Fisherman missing after boat accident

first_imgIn North WestPolice are still combing the Barima River in the North West District of Region One in hope of finding fisherman Edward O’Neil alive or dead, after the boat in which he and 19-year-old Venezuelan national Kamal Hosea were travelling crashed into a piece of wood and ran aground on Sunday at about 02:00hrs.The two were reportedly heading home after a night out drinking at the Kumaka Landing when the incident occurred.Informing that the Police are investigating the circumstances leading to the incident, Commander Ravindradat Budhram has said a search party is out combing the area in search of O’Neil. He said initial investigations have revealed that the duo were proceeding close to the bank of the river when the boat hit a wood before running into some bushes.Kamal told the Police that following the mishap he began combing the area for his friend, but did not locate him. An alarm was raised and residents in the area formed a search party, but their search yielded no results. Kamal was later taken to the Mabaruma Hospital where he is receiving treatment.In July, a father and son lost their lives after the boat in which they were travelling was hit by another boat belonging to the Mabaruma Hospital. George Piper and his son Ravin, 18, along with another man known only as ‘Wood,’ were tossed out of their vessel at the mouth of the Moruca River; and while the other man survived the accident, George and his son lost their lives.last_img read more

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