Ministry Staff Bids Farewell to John Junor

first_imgRelatedMinistry Staff Bids Farewell to John Junor RelatedMinistry Staff Bids Farewell to John Junor FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail They came out in their numbers to bid a fond farewell to the man they have come to know and love for two years shy of a decade.No, it was not his funeral even though for some, it was surely a sad occasion, as they will miss greatly, his bright smile, infectious personality and most of all, the warmth that he so generously shared around the Ministry of Health.Gathering at the tastefully decorated Urban Development Corporation (UDC) poolside at the Oceana Building on King Street for an evening of appreciation for outgoing Minister of Health, John Junor, on April 27, staff expressed warm tributes to the man, who managed to touch their hearts in various ways throughout his tenure.As the speakers from various agencies and entities associated with the Ministry paraded to the podium, there was one message punctuating the tributes: “Minister Junor was always fair and always wanted to know both sides”.Indeed, this was a testament to the measure of the man, as even if the ruling handed down was not in the favour of the complainant, they felt at least he had heard their side of the story.Then, there were recollections of the warm, pleasant smile, which radiated in its true glory in the mornings as he greeted staff when entering the building. This was especially encapsulated in the remarks by a wheelchair-bound, Christine Keene, on behalf of the front office staff, who was effusive in her praise of Mr. Junor’s generous personality.Others joked that many thought he was a medical doctor given his expansive knowledge of health issues. In fact, Dr. Ernest Pate, Pan-American Health Organisation/World Health Organisation (PAHO/WHO) Representative in Jamaica, Bermuda and Cayman Islands, said in his remarks on behalf international agencies, that his international associates in Geneva, Switzerland could not be convinced that the Minister was not a medical doctor. “Up to this day they believe that he is a doctor,” he quipped.Gold Medallist at the world championships of the performing arts in California last year, Karla Josephs, who is the daughter of Public Relations Manager at the Ministry, Beverley Josephs, paid tribute to the Minister with a heartfelt rendition of ‘Wind Beneath My Wings’.Not to be outdone, the “thespians” as they call themselves, brought the house down with their highlights of the Minister’s tenure in song. It was this talented bunch from the Ministry, who accompanied Mr. Junor’s carolling, when he insisted on doing something different last Christmas to bring cheer to each floor at the Ministry.In his response to the outpouring of love, the affable Minister attributed his success to the dedicated staff working in the health sector. This, was in addition to noting that the various improvements in the health sector over the years was due to the legacy of successive governments, recognising that consensus was needed in order to forge ahead.“It was one area in which there was no need to have a fight. There was always national focus and agreement in terms of health issues,” he said, while thanking his colleagues.He had a few helpful words for incoming Minister, Horace Dalley, who he said, has been a friend for more than 30 years. Mr. Junor said his colleague would more than distinguish himself in his new portfolio as he did with his previous assignments, even when some of his decisions were unpopular. “He always stood up to the challenge,” he pointed out.“People will follow if you lead with compassion and humility,” he advised Minister Dalley.Mr. Junor also shared his secret for success with the new Minister, by bequeathing to him the source of all his knowledge, a medical book published by PAHO.Before serving as Minister of Health from 1998 to 2006, Mr. Junor was Minister of Tourism in the Office of the Prime Minister from 1995-1997 and Minister of Local Government, Youth and Sport from 1993-1995. As Minister of Health, he will be most remembered for the establishment of the National Health Fund, which was officially launched in November 2003. The Fund was launched as part of the Ministry’s efforts to tackle the rising problems of chronic diseases among Jamaicans. RelatedMinistry Staff Bids Farewell to John Junorcenter_img Ministry Staff Bids Farewell to John Junor UncategorizedMay 3, 2006 Advertisementslast_img read more

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Proposed board actions

first_imgProposed board actions March 1, 2011 Regular News Proposed board actionscenter_img Pursuant to Standing Board Policy 1.60, the Board of Governors of The Florida Bar publishes this notice of intent to consider the following items at its March 25 meeting in Orlando, Florida. These matters are additionally governed by Rule 1-12.1, Rules Regulating The Florida Bar. Most amendments to the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar that are finally acted upon by the board must still be formally filed with the Supreme Court of Florida, with further notice and opportunity to be heard, before they are officially approved and become effective.To receive a full copy of the text of any of these proposed amendments call (850)561-5751. Please reference any requested proposal by its title or item number and date of this publication. RULES REGULATING THE FLORIDA BAR Chapter 1 General Subchapter 1-3 Membership 1. Rule 1-3.7 Reinstatement to Membership Summary: Within subdivision (f)(2), clarifies that any lawyer who has not actively practiced or been in a position requiring a law license for the entire period of inactive membership must complete the basic skills course and 30 hours of continuing legal education to become eligible. Terminology changed from “attorney” to “lawyer” throughout to conform to the Supreme Court of Florida style guide. Chapter 3 Rules of DisciplineSubchapter 3-6 Employment of Certain Attorneys or Former Attorneys 2. Rule 3-6.1 Generally Summary: Adds new subdivision (d)(4) to prohibit suspended attorneys and former attorneys who have been disbarred, or whose disciplinary resignations or revocations have been allowed, from representing clients in administrative proceedings and before administrative agencies which allow non-lawyer agents or “qualified representatives” to represent clients in certain circumstances.Subchapter 3-7 Procedures 3. Rule 3-7.1 Confidentiality Summary: Adds new subdivision (l)(3) to authorize release of confidential information on pending investigations upon receipt of a signed waiver by respondents who are applying for board certification to BLSE and its committees; renumbers subdivision (l)(3) to (l)(4). 4. Rule 3-7.10 Reinstatement and Readmission Procedures Summary: Within subdivision (f)(3), clarifies that ordinary life activities do not constitute rehabilitation; within subdivision (f)(3)(G) defines community and civil service; within the comment, provides discussion and case law discussing community and civic service required for reinstatement. Chapter 4 Rules of Professional ConductSubchapter 4-6 Public Service 5. Rule 4-6.5 Voluntary Pro Bono Plan Summary: Within subdivision (b), expands the number of committee members on the Standing Committee on Pro Bono Legal Service from 20 specifically designated members to 21 specifically required members plus 4 nonspecific, at-large members for a total of no more than 25 members. Expands eligible board member appointees from current to past or current board members. Adds YLD president or designee to the list of required members. Within subdivision (c)(2)(D) and (E), deleted extraneous language and reworded for clarity and consistency. Within subdivision (d), reworded for clarity and consistency. Chapter 20 Florida Registered Paralegal ProgramSubchapter 20-3 Eligibility Requirements 6. Rule 20-3.1 Requirements for Registration Summary: Deletes subdivision (c), Grandfathering because the provision sunsets March 1, 2011. Subchapter 20-4 Registration 7. Rule 20-4.1 Generally Summary: Within subdivision (a), codifies application requirement of supplying an attestation from the current employer; Deletes subdivision (a)(3) relating to grandfathering provision that is being sunsetted; Within subdivision (e) adds introductory language noting that there are exceptions to the payment of annual renewal fee and changes annual registration to annual renewal as that is the more accurate term. Adds new subdivision (f) allowing FRPs employed by the government to pay their annual renewal in installments; adds new subdivision (g) exempting FRPs who are activated reserve members of the military from the payment of annual renewal. STANDING BOARD POLICIES 8. SBP 15.90 Review and Approval of Disciplinary Cost Payment PlansSummary: Within subdivision (a), adds “due to the Bar” to the title. Deletes subdivision (a)(2), restitution. Within subdivision (a)(3), renumbers and lowers from 90 to 30 the number of days after which diversion fees are delinquent. Deletes subdivision (a)(4), fee arbitration awards. Adds new subdivision (b) stating that restitution or arbitration awards awarded by courts of arbitration panels not paid within 30 days after the award or court order is final are payment delinquencies. Within subdivision (e) [proposed subdivision (f)] and (h) [proposed subdivision (i)] adds that review of payment plans of duration longer than one year must be reviewed by the Disciplinary Review Committee subject to final approval by the board of governors. Renumbers subsequent subdivisions accordingly. Other editorial and style changes made. SECTION BYLAWS 9. Bylaws – Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law Section S ummary: ARTICLE II• Section 2.2. replaces executive council enrollment of affiliate members with ability of affiliates themselves to join the section.• Within Article II, Section 2.2, expands category of potential affiliates to any person interested.• Within Article II, Section 2.2, (a), removes “Florida” from ABA-accredited law school to allow any student from any ABA-accredited law school to join the section.• Article II, Section 2.3, adds the phrase “for Members and for Affiliates” to those whose dues are fixed by the executive council. ARTICLE III• Within Article III, Section 3.1, (a), adds immediate past chair as an officer of the section.• Within Article III, Section 3.2, (c), adds that immediate past chair is member of executive council and may be appointed to any standing or ad hoc committee and prohibits former immediate past chair from executive council membership and from holding any section office for 2 years after his/her term as immediate past chair.• Within Article III, Section 3.2, (d) & (e), re-numbering.• Within Article III, Section 3.3, new subdivision (c), adds term of office for immediate past chair. Re-numbers subdivisions (c) and (d). ARTICLE IV• Within Article IV, Section 4.1, changes number of past chairs serving on executive council from 5 to 1.• Within Article IV, Section 4.3, adds executive council as sole authority to approve or cancel contracts on behalf of the section. Adds two weeks’ notice for submission of contracts/agreements to council. Adds authority of executive council to determine matters of policy regarding sponsorship benefits, complimentary or discount participation at seminars or events and other matters affecting income and expenses. Adds expenditures over $250 may not be made without prior council approval.• Within Article IV, Section 4.4, removes “correspondence.” Adds video conferencing. Prohibits proxy voting. Allows voting in-person, telephonically. or by email, except for annual executive council meeting. ARTICLE VII• Within Article VII, Section 7.1, requires members to be present to vote at the section’s annual meeting.• Within Article VII, Section 7.2, requires that annual executive council meeting take place immediately prior to the section’s annual meeting and requires that members be physically present to vote.• Adds Article VII, Section 7.4 requiring Roberts Rules of Order to govern conduct of council meetings. ARTICLE VIII• Adds Article VIII requiring that the section listserv adhere to existing written policies and that the written policies must be prominently displayed on the section’s website. Adds that violation of listserv rules will result in removal from listserv. ARTICLE IX• This article was previously numbered Article VIII. Adds 15-day written notice re bylaw amendments. ARTICLE X• This article was previously numbered Article IX. Section’s renumbered to 10.1 through 10.4.• Within Article X, Section 10.2 (a), adds council must pre-approve expenses in order to be reimbursed.• Adds Article X, Section 10.2 (b) prohibits section members from negotiating or signing facility contracts and provides that contracts executed without prior executive council and Florida Bar approval are unauthorized and will be the personal responsibility of the executor.• Adds Article X, Section 10.4 requiring uniform application of all fees and charges. 10. Real Property, Probate & Trust Law Section BylawsARTICLE I – NAME AND PURPOSES Section 1. Name. Makes minor style change. Section 2. Purposes. Reorganizes and makes stylistic edits for greater clarity.Clarifies that the purview of the section extends to fields of law that are related to real property, probate and trust law, such as guardianship law. Clarifies that construction law is within the scope of real property law. Places a greater emphasis on section service to the public.ARTICLE II – SECTION MEMBERSHIP Section 1. Membership Types. Makes stylistic edits throughout for greater clarity.Subdivision (a) adds language to provide that if an active section member ceases to be a member of the section because the member is no longer a member of The Florida Bar in good standing, reinstatement as a member of The Florida Bar in good standing shall automatically reinstate the person as an active section member, provided that the member is current in the payment of section dues. Subdivision (d) moved to new Section 4 (see below) Section 2. Membership Year. Makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Section 3. Dues. Makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Section 4. Membership Standards. [ New, moved from Section 2.(d)] Title added and adds “misconduct involving moral turpitude” to the grounds for which section membership may be terminated by two-thirds vote of the executive council at an in-state meeting after notice and opportunity to be heard. Stylistic edits for greater clarity.ARTICLE III – ORGANIZATION Reorganizes and makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Adds references to section liaisons, who are members of the executive council.ARTICLE IV – OFFICERS, ELECTED POSITIONS, AND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Section 1. Officers. Makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Changes circuit representatives to at-large-members (See Article V for further explanation). Changes circuit representatives director to at-large-members director. Recognizes that there can be more than one representative for out-of-state members. Section 2. Qualifications. Clarifies that no person may serve as a section officer, representative for out-of-state members, or at-large-member unless they are an active section member and that the loss of that status shall cause the office or position to be vacant. Provides that, if the status as an active section member ceases because of a loss of status as a member of The Florida Bar in good standing that is solely attributable to a delinquency in (i) the payment of membership fees or dues; or (ii) completing continuing legal education requirements, reinstatement as a member of The Florida Bar in good standing and as an active section member shall automatically reinstate the member to the vacant office or position if it has not been filled. Section 3. Executive Committee. Reorganizes and makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Provides that the executive committee shall have “authority to exercise the function of the executive council when and to the extent authorized by the executive council with respect to a specific matter, and on any other matter which the executive committee reasonably determines requires action between meetings of the executive council.” Current bylaws provide that the executive committee has the “authority to take emergency action on behalf of the executive council between regular executive council meetings.” Requires that all action taken by the executive committee on behalf of the executive council be reported to the executive council at its next meeting.Provides that the executive committee shall make recommendations for consideration by the chair-elect in appointing chairs and vice chairs of section committees and section liaisons. Provides that the executive committee shall make recommendations for consideration by the long-range planning committee in submitting nominees for at-large-members. Section 4. Nominating Procedure. Reorganizes and makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Changes circuit representatives to at-large-members (See Article V for further explanation). Changes circuit representatives director to at-large-members director. Recognizes that there can be more than one representative for out-of-state members.Provides that, if the office of chair-elect becomes vacant during the year, the nominations submitted by the long-range planning committee for the following year shall include a nominee for the office of section chair. Provides that, in submitting nominations for at-large-members, the long-range planning committee shall consider recommendations from the at-large-members director and the executive committee. Increases from ten to twenty-five, the minimum number of section members needed to make nominations for any elected section office or position in addition to the nominations made by the long-range planning committee. Section 5. Election and Term of Offices and Positions. Reorganizes and makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Changes circuit representatives to at-large-members (See Article V for further explanation). Recognizes that there can be more than one representative for out-of-state members. Requires that the election meeting for the election of officers, representatives for out-of-state members, and at-large-members, be held prior to July 1 of each year. Provides that the one year term of persons elected to an office or position shall begin on July 1. Current bylaws provide that the term begins at the conclusion of the annual convention of The Florida Bar. Section 6. Duties of Officers. Provides several refinements and clarifications in the duties of section officers. Provides that the at-large-members director shall have responsibility for the at-large-member and shall provide recommendations to the long-range planning committee for nominating at-large-members nominees, define the responsibilities of the at-large-members, and evaluate their performance. Section 7. Vacancies. Establishes rules and procedures for filling vacancies in section offices and eliminates conflicting provisions contained in current bylaws. Provides that a vacancy in the office of section chair shall be filled by the chair-elect.Provides that, in the event of a vacancy in the office of chair-elect, the duties of that office shall be assumed by the chair and a new chair shall be elected at next election meeting. Provides that, in the event of vacancies in the offices of both chair and chair-elect, the long-range planning committee shall select a chair, who shall also assume the duties of the chair-elect, and that a new chair and chair-elect shall be elected at next election meeting. Provides that vacancies in any other office which occur within six weeks of the next in-state executive council meeting shall be filled by the executive council at that meeting. If the vacancy occurs more than six weeks prior to such a meeting, the vacancy shall be filled by the executive committee. Provides that vacancies in the positions of member-at-large or representative for out-of-state members shall be filled by the chair.ARTICLE V – EXECUTIVE COUNCIL Section 1. Powers and Duties. Reorganizes and makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Section 2. Membership. Makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Clarifies that vice chairs of section committees and section liaisons are executive council members. Authorizes more than one representative for out-of-state members. Changes circuit representatives to at-large-members. Changes circuit representatives director to at-large-members director. Section 3. At-Large-Members and Regional Representation. Reorganizes and makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Provides that the at-large-members category of executive council membership is intended to help the section achieve its goal of maintaining active, productive members on the executive council, while preserving regional representation. To be considered for nomination as an at-large-member, prospective members must demonstrate the willingness and ability, through previous committee leadership or otherwise, to assist the section with its needs. It is anticipated that the existence of the at-large-members category of membership will facilitate a more efficient and effective allocation of resources within the executive council.Provides that, to the extent that section officers, chairs and vice chairs of section committees, section liaisons, and representatives for the out-of-state members of the section serving on the executive council do not include geographical representation from each judicial circuit and outside of Florida, the at-large-members should include such representation when reasonably practicable. The current bylaws require at least one circuit representative from each judicial circuit. Section 4. Attendance. Reorganizes and makes stylistic edits for greater clarity.Increases the procedural requirements that must be complied with to reestablish executive council membership following an automatic resignation resulting from a failure to comply with the mandatory attendance requirement for executive council meetings.ARTICLE VI – SECTION COMMITTEES AND LIAISONS Section 1. Committees. Makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Gives the section chair the authority to dissolve section committees and eliminate section liaison positions. Section 2. Section Committee Chairs and Liaisons. Makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Gives the chair-elect the authority to appoint committee chairs, committee vice chairs, and section liaisons for the coming year during which the chair-elect will serve as section chair. Gives the section chair the authority to remove committee chairs, committee vice chairs, and section liaisons, and to fill vacancies in those positions. Section 3. Committee Members. Gives committee chairs the authority to appoint and remove members to and from section committees. Section 4. Section Membership Requirement. Provides that no person may serve as a (i) chair, vice chair, or voting member of any section committee; or (ii) section liaison, unless they are an active section member, and that the loss of that status shall cause the position to be vacant. Further provides that if status of an active section member ceases because of a loss of status as a member of The Florida Bar in good standing that is solely attributable to a delinquency in (i) the payment of membership fees or dues; or (ii) completing continuing legal education requirements, reinstatement as a member of The Florida Bar in good standing and as an active section member shall automatically reinstate the member to the vacant position if it has not been filled. Section 5. Committee Reports. Requires that the chairs of section committees provide annual reports to the executive committee and clarifies the confidential status of those reports.ARTICLE VII – MEETINGS Section 1. Annual/Election Meeting of the Section. Makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Requires that the annual election meeting of the section be held prior to July 1 of each year and provides that voting by proxy is not permitted at that meeting. Section 2. Executive Council Meetings. Makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Clarifies that the executive council must conduct at least three in-state meetings each year. Provides that voting by proxy at executive council meetings is not permitted. Authorizes the executive council to transact business by voting on matters electronically. Section 3. Executive Committee Meetings. Makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Provides that the chair shall fix the date and location and give notice of meetings of the executive committee, and requires that it hold an organizational meeting prior to the beginning of each membership year. Provides that voting by proxy at executive committee meetings is not permitted. Provides that the executive committee may also take action by mail, e-mail, or telephone. New Section 4. Conduct of Meetings. Provides that, in conducting meetings of the section and its subdivisions, provisions contained in these bylaws shall prevail over any conflicting provision in Robert’s Rules of Order, and that the section chair may appoint a parliamentarian to advise and assist the section chair or any other person presiding over a meeting of the section or any of its subdivisions in connection with any procedural issues that may arise. Provides that persons who are not members of the executive council may address the executive council at meetings only with the permission of the section chair or by vote of two-thirds of the members of the executive council present (without debate). (Moved from Article IX, Section 6.)ARTICLE VIII – LEGISLATIVE, ADMINISTRATIVE, AND JUDICIAL POSITIONS Streamlines, simplifies, and substantially revises in its entirety. Section 1. Authority. Provides that the section may be involved in legislative, administrative, and judicial (including amicus curiae and court rule) activities that are within the purview of the section, provided that those activities are consistent with the purposes of the section and the policies promulgated by the board of governors, both of which are incorporated into this section). Section 2. Section Positions. Implements new terminology of “section position,” which includes all legislative, administrative, or judicial (including amicus curiae and court rule) positions, and establishes a uniform procedure for the adoption of all section positions. Section 3. Legislation Committee. Eliminates the legislation review committee as unnecessary, and provides for only one legislation committee, composed of a committee chair, a vice chair for real property, a vice chair for probate and trust, the section chair, the section chair-elect, the director of the real property law division, the director of the probate and trust law division, and such other members of the executive council as are appointed by the chair of the legislation committee with the approval of the section chair. Section 4. Procedures for Adopting and Reporting Section Positions. Requires that a proposed section position be included on the agenda for the executive council meeting and that supporting documentation be distributed to the executive council at least one week prior to the executive council meeting, unless those requirements are waived by two-thirds of the members of the executive council present at that meeting. Provides that the adoption of a section position requires that two-thirds of the executive council members present at the meeting approve it and find that it is within the purview of the section, as defined in section 1 of this article. Further provides that voting by proxy is not permitted. Provides that, in those circumstances where the executive committee is authorized to adopt a section position because time constraints do not permit action by the executive council, approval of the section position requires a two-thirds vote of the executive committee. Further provides that the adoption of a section position by the executive committee shall be reported to the executive council at its next meeting. Requires that written notice of the adoption of a section position be promptly given to The Florida Bar and circulated for comment to all divisions, sections, and committees of The Florida Bar that are believed to be interested in the matter.Provides that a section position may not be advanced by the section unless it has been submitted to, and not disapproved by, the board of governors. Provides that a section position shall remain in force for the current biennial legislative session unless rescinded by the board of governors. Provides that the section shall not participate as an amicus curiae without the consent of the board of governors. Requires that section positions shall be clearly identified as positions of the section, and not those of The Florida Bar. Section 5. Expenses Incurred in Advancing Section Positions. Provides that if the section lobbyist or section chair requests the appearance of a section member to advance a section position, the member’s reasonable expenses shall be paid by the section in accordance with its budgetary policies. Section 6. Section Lobbyist. Makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Provides that the section may retain a lobbyist to assist the section in its legislative activities or matters, subject to the approval of the board of governors. Eliminates unnecessary provisions concerning the furnishing of information, budgeting, and payments to a section lobbyist.ARTICLE IX – MISCELLANEOUS Section 1. Integrity of Section Proceedings. Disclosure of Conflict and Recusal.Includes an ethics and conflict of interest policy requiring disclosure and possible recusal by section members from participation in section proceedings on matters where facts or circumstances exist that would reasonably bring into question an accusation that a section member is biased, prejudiced, or possesses a conflict of interest with respect to that matter. Section 2. Action of The Florida Bar. Renumbered with no substantive change. Section 3. Compensation and Expenses. Continues current prohibition on salary or compensation paid to any section member, while allowing reimbursement of reasonable and necessary expenses. Eliminates the current bylaw requirement of obtaining specific authorization for reimbursements from the section chair and treasurer or the executive council. Section 4. Policies of the Section. Makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Eliminates current bylaw provision that all prior policies adopted by the section shall be rescinded by these bylaws. Section 5. Amendments. Makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Section 6. Conduct of Meetings. (Moved to Article VII. Section 4.) Section 6. Notice. (New) Provides that any bylaw requirement that notice, information, or materials be furnished may be satisfied by (i) any method of delivery specified in the requirement; (ii) transmitting the notice, information or materials by e-mail to any email address provided by the recipient to The Florida Bar; or (iii) posting the notice, information, or materials to the section’s website and notifying the member of the posting by e-mail to any e-mail address provided by the recipient to The Florida Bar. Section 7. Effective Date. (New) Provides that these bylaws shall be effective as of July 1, 2010, or upon their adoption by the executive council, or upon their approval by the board of governors, whichever occurs later. Provides that upon these revised and restated bylaws becoming effective, each existing circuit representative shall automatically become an at-large-member, and the existing circuit representatives director shall automatically become the at-large-members director.last_img read more

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Referral fee ‘witch hunt’ will ‘jeopardise thousands of jobs’

first_imgMinisters have been warned that banning personal injury referral fees will put thousands of jobs at risk and do nothing to reduce insurance premiums. Darren Werth, chairman of the Claims Standards Council, which represents claims management businesses, admitted he was shocked by the government’s announcement. Werth accused the insurance lobby of running a ‘propaganda campaign’ against the industry and warned that many people will be worried about their jobs following the ban. ‘I cannot understand any motivation for this other than a witch hunt and it has caught everyone totally unawares,’ he said. ‘There are roughly 3,500 claims management companies in this country with thousands of staff. You’re talking about a loss of revenue in corporation tax and VAT, not to mention potential unemployment for many. ‘Insurers are the real offenders here and as a result claims management companies and solicitors will suffer, with no benefit for the client – indeed premiums will probably rise.’ Werth stressed that just 14% of personal injury cases are filed as a result of a referral fee, with a far greater proportion of clients finding a solicitor through advertising or word of mouth. He said claims management companies usually receive around £200 for an average referral involving a name and contact details, with the charge only rising when the CMC carries out lengthy vetting work and background checks that save time for both the solicitor and insurer. ‘Referral fees are an effective way of marketing and why should the legal profession not be allowed to market their services? ‘One insurer in 2009 spent £182m on advertising but no-one is questioning that. There is no evidence that premiums will fall as a result of this and the worry is that it will push referral fees underground.’ He said the Claims Standards Council will now wait for more details on the ban, including how the government plans to define a referral fee and when the ban is likely to implemented.last_img read more

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BBA battles weather

first_imgThe industrial filters, which measured 17 m x 4.5 m x 4.3 m and weighed approximately 20 tonnes each, were transported by road from central Poland to the Port of Swinoujscie where both units were loaded onto a multipurpose coaster vessel.According to BBA Transport, the vessel travelled through harsh winter weather to arrive on time at the Norwegian terminal.See a video of the project here.  www.bbats.pllast_img

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Will the Whopper be delivered? “Working on it,” CEO says

first_imgNEW YORK | Burger King. Tim Hortons. Popeyes. All three fall under the same person, Daniel Schwartz, the CEO of their parent company Restaurant Brands International Inc. His strategy: spread those fast-food chains around the world.Burger King, for example, has gone from having zero stores in France five years ago to more than 100 today. Canadian doughnut and coffee seller Tim Hortons has expanded into Europe and Asia. And there are plans to bring fried-chicken chain Popeyes, which Restaurant Brands bought earlier this year, to more countries. Schwartz talked with The Associated Press recently about delivery in the U.S., expansion plans and what he orders from each chain. The questions and answers below have been edited for clarity and length.Q: Your rivals are expanding delivery in more parts of the country. When will Burger King deliver in the U.S.?A: We actually explored delivery several years ago in the U.S. prematurely. But it’s something that we are focused on now. We’re working on it. We’re doing delivery in some of our Popeyes restaurants in the U.S. and Canada already.Q: Restaurant Brands bought Popeyes earlier this year for $1.8 billion. Why Popeyes?A: What we saw in Popeyes was an iconic brand with a big opportunity to expand all around the world. If you look at some of the peers in that space, the number of restaurants they have outside the U.S. is quite large. Popeyes is in around 30 to 40 countries, which is very small.Q: Is Popeyes in China?A: No, but the answer should be yes. It’s a great brand and we think it’ll resonate really well with our guests all throughout Asia, so that’s a priority.Q: Why aren’t there many Tim Hortons in the U.S.?A: It takes time and we’ve been expanding in the U.S. We have our largest presence in Buffalo, Detroit and Columbus. We’ve opened some restaurants in Cincinnati; we’ll be opening up some restaurants in Indianapolis; we’ve opened some in Minneapolis. Our new partners in Cleveland recently announced they will be opening some restaurants there. It’s historically been a predominantly Canadian chain. We heard people ask the same question in the Philippines and the U.K., and now we are opening up restaurants there.Q: What’s up with the crazy menu items, like the Cinnamon Toast Crunch shake at Burger King?A: We have amazing milkshakes, and it’s a nice, fun, playful way of bringing some innovation to them. They get a lot of buzz on social media, and our guests like it.Q: Do you have to approve those items first?A: No, no, no. My involvement is fostering this creative and growth culture and being involved in the hiring of good people. I am not choosing the products because we have to empower people to be able to make decisions and be innovative. So if they need my approval to do all these things, then we’d be really slow. And we don’t want to be slow.Q: Which menu items do you order at each place?A: Whopper, obviously. With Tims, I’ll have a double double and lately a latte because we launched espressos this year. It’s a lot of coffee. And Popeyes, I’m still in the phase where I just eat everything on the menu. I will tell you, it’s rare I have a week where I haven’t eaten products from all of them.Q: Where do you work?A: I kind of work on an airplane. The Burger King brand headquarters is in Miami. The Tims headquarters and our head office is in Toronto. And we have international offices for the brands in Switzerland and Singapore, so I kind of bop back and forth around all the offices. And I try to spend most of my time visiting our restaurant owners. In the office, you kind of lose sight. You have to go to the restaurants to see what’s really happening.Contact Joseph Pisani at https://twitter.com/josephpisani In this Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017, photo, Daniel Schwartz, the CEO of Restaurant Brands International, which owns Burger King, Popeyes and Tim Hortons, talks during an interview in New York. Schwartz talked with The Associated Press about delivery in the U.S., expansion plans and what he orders from each chain under his leadership. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)last_img read more

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