NEWS SCAN: H5N1 reports from Nepal, possible H7N3 in Mexico, flu and RSV seasonality, NDM bacteria cluster

first_imgFeb 15, 2013Nepal reports five recent H5N1 outbreaksLivestock officials in Nepal today reported five H5N1 avian influenza outbreaks, four of which were noted earlier this week in media coverage, according to a report today to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). Nepal has recently experienced a spate of outbreaks in the Kathmandu valley, plus one in Mechi zone, located in the eastern part of the country near the border with India. Today’s OIE report included another outbreak in the Kathmandu valley, a commercial broiler flock located in Setidevi village. All of the outbreaks occurred at commercial farms except for the one in Mechi zone, which struck the affected village’s backyard poultry. The five outbreaks killed 3,651 of 16,560 susceptible birds, and the remaining poultry were destroyed to curb the spread of the virus.Feb 15 OIE reportLarge Mexican poultry producer battling possible H7N3 avian fluMexico’s largest poultry producer and processor yesterday announced a possible outbreak of H7N3 avian flu on five of its breeder farms in the state of Guanajuato. Work is ongoing to verify the outbreak and to implement sanitary measures if needed. The company, Industrias Bachoco, is one of the largest poultry producers in the world and has almost 100 breeder farms in Mexico that produce hatching eggs for producing chickens. A press release from the company says that it is reinforcing its biosecurity measures at all facilities, particularly its breeder farms, and “analyzing steps to mitigate possible negative effects.” H7N3 avian flu was detected in the neighboring state of Jalisco in 2012 on farms owned by other poultry producers and led to the culling of millions of poultry. The virus again struck poultry farms last month in Aguascalientes state, directly north of Jalisco, as well as separate farms in Jalisco, leading to the culling of almost 700,000 birds.Feb 14 Bachoco press releaseFlu and RSV show temporal seasonality, even in much of the tropicsMany tropical regions worldwide, commonly thought to experience influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) year-round, actually have seasonal variations in the diseases similar to those in temperate climes, according to what is likely the first quantitative study of the subject on a global scale. The meta-analysis, which evaluated information gathered through the literature and electronic surveillance Web sites from 137 locations on five continents, was published yesterday in PLoS One. One third of the study’s data came from tropical areas. The authors found the expected peaks during winter months for both flu and RSV in temperate areas, with some showing peaks in both winter and summer for flu and Northern Europe showing biennial cycles for RSV. Overall, 80% and 50% of tropical areas showed distinct seasons lasting 6 months or less for RSV and flu, respectively. Tropical areas of Southeast Asia fairly commonly showed semiannual peaks in activity for both viruses. Weak latitudinal gradients were apparent in the timing of epidemics of both flu and RSV, with peak activity later in the year with increasing latitude (P < 0.03). No location studied had constant respiratory activity throughout the year when individual years were considered.Feb 14 PLoS One studyDenver cluster was biggest US outbreak of NDM-producing bacteriaEight patients in a Denver hospital last year harbored Klebsiella pneumoniae carrying New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase (NDM), an enzyme that confers resistance to many antimicrobials, marking the biggest such outbreak in the United States so far, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The outbreak was first spotted with the detection of carbapenem-resistant K pneumoniae (CRKP) in respiratory samples from two patients in July and August, says an article in today's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). Review of records and surveillance cultures identified six more cases. The patients had been hospitalized for a median of 18 days before CRKP was identified. Three of them were treated for CRKP infections, and five were found to be asymptomatically colonized. All of them survived. Tests revealed that the initial isolates were resistant to all antimicrobials except tigecycline. An epidemiologic investigation suggested that multiple transmission events had occurred and that "undetected, asymptomatically colonized patients were involved in some transmission routes." How the pathogen got into the hospital was unclear. Before this outbreak, only 16 isolates of NDM-producing carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) had been found in the United States, 14 of them in patients who had received medical care in South Asia. In a Health Alert Network advisory e-mailed to reporters today, the CDC said that, of the 37 unusual forms of CRE reported in the United States, 15 have been reported since July 2012. The agency called for healthcare providers to act aggressively to prevent the emergence and spread of these organisms.Feb 15 MMWR articleRelated Aug 15, 2012, CIDRAP News itemlast_img read more

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Dennis Rodman talks about the ‘always smiling’ Kim Jong Un singing karaoke, horseback riding

first_img Related ABC News.(NEW YORK) — Despite his decidedly non-governmental look and unusual diplomatic style, former NBA superstar Dennis Rodman has gotten more access to North Korea’s dictator than any other American.ABC News recently sat down with Rodman to talk about his unique relationship with perhaps the most mysterious leader in the world, Kim Jong Un.This past week, Rodman was on what he called a “humanitarian” tour of Asia, first in Guam pitching his proposal for a goodwill basketball game between North Korea and the U.S. territory, which Kim once threatened with a missile attack. The unlikely international diplomat was also recently in Beijing promoting talks between Kim and President Trump, whom Rodman knew as a one-time contestant on “The Apprentice.”During our interview in New York City, the towering 6-foot-7 former Chicago Bulls star was wearing his trademark sunglasses and a potcoin.com shirt, the company sponsoring his recent overseas trips. Potcoin is a crypto currency that can be used to buy legal marijuana. Five times Rodman has traveled to North Korea and three times has he met with the leader who has been a huge Chicago Bulls fan since he was a little kid. Perhaps it is ironic that the dictator of North Korea, who publically condemns America, just loves Frank Sinatra. According to Dennis Rodman, Kim Jong Un picked “My Way” on his Karaoke to sing it in Korean.“He’s pretty good,” Rodman said. “He had his girl band, 14 girls that travel with him everywhere to play his music… he was singing it in North Korean. There was like 70 people at this big round table, I’m like, ‘Wow.’ Everybody had their turn, had a shot of vodka, took a vodka shot and then try to sing karaoke.’” Rodman also provided more inside details about his discussions with the leader of North Korea, including his language talents, horse riding abilities and basketball skills.“Every time you see us talking like this, We are talking about basketball,” Rodman said. “One time, he said, ‘Dennis, I would love to go to New York, to Madison Square Garden. He says, ‘I’d love to go to New York, but I can’t…’ He says stuff like that.”Rodman has refused to discuss politics and had nothing to say about starvation and executions within North Korea. But he did tell us about some more personal impressions of the elusive North Korean leader. As journalists we have been trying to get an interview with Kim Jong Un ever since he took power in 2011 but so far he has refused. So as of now Dennis Rodman has become, unexpectedly, one of our very best sources into what makes Kim Jong Un tick.“He’s always smiling, man… He’s always smiling with his people, his sister, his brother,” Rodman said. “His family is so at ease when they’re around each other. Just like regular people.” Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.Powered by WPeMaticolast_img read more

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