Chief Crown Attorney of Halifax Region Appointed

first_imgPaul Carver has been appointed chief Crown attorney of the Halifax region of Nova Scotia, effective June 2. “I am very pleased to have a Crown attorney of Mr. Carver’s calibre heading the Halifax region,” said Martin Herschorn, director of Public Prosecutions. “His experience and ability make him well suited for this key management role.” Mr. Carver will lead a team of 30 Crown attorneys and more than 20 support staff in Halifax and Dartmouth. A native of Halifax, Mr. Carver holds a combined honours bachelor of arts degree in history and political science from Dalhousie University. He graduated from Dalhousie Law School in 1992. Mr. Carver began his law career as an articled clerk to Craig Garson, at Scaravelli and Garson in Halifax. In 1995, he joined the Nova Scotia Public Prosecution Service where he has prosecuted thousands of Criminal Code charges ranging from theft to murder. In 2007, Mr. Carver joined the Public Prosecution Service of Canada where he prosecuted offences under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act. He returned to the Nova Scotia Public Prosecution Service in 2009. Mr. Carver is an expert on dangerous offender applications, has been published on the topic, and has given many presentations to the public, police officers and other justice system participants. Mr. Carver is also the service’s provincial co-ordinator for the National High Risk Offender Flagging Program. Mr. Carver replaces Denise Smith, who has been appointed deputy director of public prosecutions.last_img read more

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Hatch Microgrid helps manage wind power storage at Raglan

first_imgA 3 MW wind turbine integrated with an energy storage network using an energy management system is saving Glencore’s Raglan mine 2.4 million litres of diesel per year for power generation. The first of its kind in the world, the project located on the northern tip of Quebec in the Canadian Arctic smoothes out wind power variations to maintain grid power quality in the face of highly variable winds and severely low temperatures that can reach -40°C.The wind turbine was installed in mid-2014 and Hatch is currently involved in commissioning the energy storage systems: a high-speed flywheel, a lithium-ion battery, and a hydrogen storage loop composed of an electrolyser, a fuel cell, and hydrogen storage tanks. The Hatch Microgrid Controller (HμGrid) monitors demand for wind power and variations in supply, and economically dispatches the charge and discharge of the energy storage units, through complex algorithms, to produce a smooth power output that enables higher wind power penetration on the microgrid to displace diesel generation.Hatch states: “It has been a long journey to overcome all the challenges that arose during the project. There were numerous lessons learned to successfully deliver sophisticated equipment to a remote location in harsh climatic conditions. The next steps for Hatch include post-commissioning support, operational monitoring, and optimisation of the entire system to maximise fuel savings.”In the engineering and construction phases of the project, tight integration of Hatch, the Glencore Raglan mine, Tugliq Energy Co (owner of the wind turbine and energy storage systems) and the many suppliers “was key to the delivery of this remote project during the short Arctic summer construction window.” Hatch’s work has also included a complete wind energy production assessment, turnkey delivery of the integrated flywheel system, and management of the implementation of the other energy storage components. Hatch assisted with successful government funding applications to Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) and the Government of Quebec (this funding has been a catalyst for important innovation, and provided key support to the long-term agreement between Tugliq and Glencore.Hatch states that the project is a complete success and Tugliq Energy Co intends to implement similar systems at other mine sites and remote communities to reduce the burden of high diesel cost and greenhouse gas impacts. Hatch says it intends to further develop high-penetration hybrid solutions to leverage its microgrid controller and experience in renewables, energy storage, and conventional power generation.last_img read more

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Sydney Uni unites 10 nations in its Super Globe squad

Handball Australiapascal winklerphilipp enderssydney uni Sydney Uni this week announced its squad for the IHF Super Globe, which will start on Sunday. German coach Philipp Enders picked players from no less than 10 nations, and is hopeful this team will achieve the best ever result – thanks to some new recruits, but also the unique Aussie team spirit.Question: Philipp, this is the third year the Sydney Uni Handball Club participates at the Super Globe as Oceania champions, after 2012 and 2013. What will be different from the previous years?Enders: That’s really difficult to anticipate. I am pretty sure that the talent and potential we combine is bigger than in previous years. But then we struggle again with similar things every year, like the lack of adequate opponents – which means we miss the intensity of those games.Question: What’s changed at Sydney Uni in the last 12 months since the last participation?Enders: For us, the preparation for the 2014 Super Globe started right after the last game at last year’s tournament. We had a very clear vision that we wanted to further improve our results.Towards the end of 2013 we then started an outreach with the aim of recruiting talented students and other keen young handball players from around the world, who wanted to join us for the 2014 Super Globe. We were inundated with inquiries, many did not lead to an agreement though as we’re a pure amateur club. In the end, we however still managed to recruit a few very good players.Question: So, as an amateur team you don’t pay any salaries or benefits? Enders: No, there’s absolutely no money involved.Question: So your budget is not really comparable with Europe then? Enders: No not really – for the whole club we operate with less than 30’000 Euros. This year, we had to deal with significant additional cost as we had to travel to New Caledonia for the Oceania Championships. The players ended up paying for the majority of their flights themselves. Luckily, Chateau Royal became our hotel sponsor, and Vegeta increased their contribution – so in the end we’re very happy to cover our (comparatively small) budget.Question: Tell me a bit about the team and its characteristicsEnders: It’s a really international crew. Besides 7 Australians – who are all current or former national team members – we have players from Argentina, Brazil, Denmark, France, Germany, Poland, Serbia, Sweden and Spain.I don’t even know where to start in describing the characteristics of this team… it’s a really unique situation I think. Some of our players have put themselves through significant financial strains in order to join the club. Many of them have taken jobs on minimum salaries, even cleaning toilets, just to make their dream of playing against Barcelona a reality!Other players like Pascal Winkler or Sebastien Traverso have a dual role. Besides their day job and being players, they also invest a lot of time into the management of the club and our dream of making Australian handball better and more popular. I am incredibly proud of this group of guys. The sacrifices which this team is making deserve everyone’s respect.Question: How strong do you think your team is this year?Enders: It’s probably the strongest team I’ve ever had at Sydney Uni. Of course, the integration of the new players took time, but that was to be expected. Some of the games at the Australian Championships and the Oceania Championships were really tight. But we were able to defend our titles, and we probably learned quite a lot too along the way – which is important.Question: Speaking of the Oceania Championships – you missed that tournament due to the birth of your son. Did you suffer, having to follow from afar?Enders: Yes, definitely. Saint Kilda Handball Club from Melbourne came well prepared. They have a very strong team right now, with a few class players – and we expect them to keep challenging us in the future.Question: So there are positive signs for the development of handball in Australia?Enders: Some positive signs, some negative ones. The re-introduction of the Australian Club Championships is definitely very positive for handball in the region. What we’d need in order to take the next step is a National League – which would really lift the profile of the sport with the media and the public. In order to cover the high travel cost for such a league, we’d however require a major sponsor.On the other hand, there’s of course the negative impact the exclusion of the national team from the World Cup 2015 has had. The team had gone through a very intense preparation towards the World Championships – and the disqualification has really pulled the guys the rug from underneath their feet. I sincerely hope that the IHF makes up for it through additional funding for handball in the Oceania region, so handball can keep growing. Australia is such a sports mad country, the potential for handball here is massive!Question: Lastly, what are your goals for the 2014 Super Globe?Enders: There can only be one objective – to win our first game. Of course, we’re not expecting it in our game against Barcelona… ← Previous Story Dagur Sigursson announces team for games against Switzerland Next Story → BUNDESLIGA ROCKS: HBW Balingen beat THW Kiel! read more

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