Watch John Mayer Shred With Zac Brown Band At Hollywood Bowl

first_imgJohn Mayer’s time is coming quickly. Soon enough he’ll be sharing the stage alongside Bob Weir, Bill Kreutzmann, and Mickey Hart of the Grateful Dead for the ensemble’s slated Dead & Company dates, but over the weekend, Mayer paid a visit to the Hollywood Bowl during the Zac Brown Band show to jam with with his old friend.John Mayer and Bob Weir Comment On Touring After Fare Thee WellMayer emerged at the end of Brown’s set and lit into a trio of covers including, Bill Withers’ “Use Me,” a Jimi Hendrix-esque version of Bob Dylan’s “All Along The Watchtower” and Avicii’s “Broken Arrows.” Take a look at “Watchtower” from the show below:[Via Jambands.com]last_img read more

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Judith McLaughlin to run for Vermont State Senate in Franklin County

first_imgJudith McLaughlin of Franklin has announced her candidacy for the Vermont State Senate as an Independent.  In 2010,  McLaughlin came in immediately behind incumbents Randy Brock and Sara Kittell.  Neither incumbent is running for re-election. She ran as a Republican for the seat in 2010. In a statement, she said: â It is my wish to represent all of Franklin County and Alburgh the best way that I can, without being restrained by party.  As an independent I will legislate for the good of Franklin County and Alburgh, as well as all of Vermont, without the restrictions of partisan politics.  I have always said, itâ s not about the party, itâ s about the people.âMcLaughlin said she will take her mountain bike and traverse the roads of Franklin county and Alburgh this summer personally discussing her 4-point Platform; Diversified Agriculture, Rural Youth, Affordable Energy and Entrepreneurism. â I understand first-hand the issues our small businesses and agricultural community faces, and I will be their champion.  As a former agricultural small business owner, and a current homesteader looking to develop a new agricultural-based business, I struggle along with others like me who continue to face the bureaucratic red-tape that tends to stymie entrepreneurship.  Vermont requires more entrepreneurs to develop new demands for local food.  A business-friendly infrastructure developed specifically for diversified agriculture is paramount in VT.  Small, state-of-the-art, regional processing facilities are required for our natural/organic meat and poultry producers.   We need year-round facilities in our communities for our local farmers to market their products.  We need our permitting processes simplified.  We need tax relief for small businesses while we continue to improve our road and communication networks.â  McLaughlin, a Vermont Army National Guard retired Lieutenant Colonel, spent her career working with civil authorities and youth, both here in the States as well as overseas. â Here in Vermont, our rural youth need inspiration.  They canâ t be what they canâ t see.  We need to cease lamenting that their generation will never be great, and we need to begin showing them how they can.  When our youth have no hope for a higher education, or a livable-wage job, we lose them to crime, homelessness or the cycle of public support.  Iâ ve spent most of my career mentoring and teaching youth and I will champion affordable tuition at our State Colleges, community mentor centers and programs, along with school curriculums that better prepare our youth to become young leaders.âShe said that in their spare time, Judith and her husband Rob teach younger generations all the forgotten arts inherent to a self-sufficient family.  Judith and Rob raise their vegetables, honey, eggs and herbs for multiple families, and teach their younger generations how to become self-sufficient while reducing their energy footprint. Judith stated, â Energy efficiency is a personal as well as state responsibility.  We all need to participate to ensure affordable energy for Vermonters, and to protect our most vulnerable.    Yet, we need to rethink how we look at renewable energy in Vermont, and shift our focus from large-scale community projects to homeowner solutions.  The ultimate result is a reduced energy footprint in Vermont.  How we get there is our choice.  I will champion new and innovative small businesses that develop alternative energy solutions that are affordable and sustainable for the homeowner.  Alternative energy must available to all homes.  I will promote tax credits for improving homeowner energy efficiency, while ensuring our current public utilities, as well as new development remains responsive and responsible to Vermonters needs.âlast_img read more

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BMH and CCV awarded grant to continue accelerated medical assistant program

first_imgBrattleboro Memorial Hospital,Community College of Vermont,Vermont Business Magazine Brattleboro Memorial Hospital (BMH) has recently been awarded a Small Rural Hospital Improvement Grant (SHIP) of $19,000 over the next two years. This grant will provide support for the College to Career Program, BMH and Community College of Vermont’s accelerated Medical Assistant training program, and will strengthen the variety of population health services and programs in the Brattleboro area.  For the past three years, BMH and Community College of Vermont (CCV) have joined forces to create and implement an accelerated program to prepare qualified candidates for jobs as Certified Medical Assistants. This program was created in response to challenges filling positions within the local healthcare workforce, and has become a critical resource for both BMH and for people in the Brattleboro area who are looking to increase their skills and to obtain jobs in the medical profession.Medical Assistants (MAs) support clinicians by preparing patients for their exams, performing basic laboratory tests, and documenting patients’ medical histories, among other clinical responsibilities.  By providing these much needed services, Medical Assistants free up clinicians to spend more face-to-face time with patients, and increase the number of patients that clinicians can care for each day.This grant will provide for full tuition for eight new students to complete an 18-week program to obtain their Medical Assistant certification, allowing them to begin a career within BMH’s Medical Group practices.  The training will include rotations throughout the various specialties of BMH’s twelve outpatient practices in order to learn how to operate specific equipment and to navigate and document electronic medical records.Classes will be held on the CCV Brattleboro campus.  For more information about the Medical Assistant program, please go to www.ccv.edu(link is external) Brattleboro Memorial HospitalFounded in 1904, Brattleboro Memorial Hospital (BMH) is a licensed, 61-bed, not-for-profit community hospital located in southeastern Vermont, serving a rural population of about 55,000 people in 22 towns in Vermont, New Hampshire and Massachusetts. The BMH medical staff includes board-certified providers in primary care and many other specialties, with a shared mission of providing exceptional health care delivered with compassion and respect. The Brattleboro Memorial Hospital Health System includes the BMH Medical Group, a multispecialty group practice of primary care and specialty care physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants. Over 110 active volunteers assist BMH’s 600 employees in caring for our community.Community College of VermontCCV is Vermont’s second largest college, serving over 7,000 students each semester.  With 12 locations and extensive online learning options, students don’t have to travel far from their communities to access CCV’s degree and certificate programs, workforce, secondary and continuing education opportunities, and academic and veterans support services.Source: Brattleboro, VT — (August 30, 2018) – Brattleboro Memorial Hospitallast_img read more

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Proposed board actions

first_imgProposed board actions March 1, 2011 Regular News Proposed board actionscenter_img Pursuant to Standing Board Policy 1.60, the Board of Governors of The Florida Bar publishes this notice of intent to consider the following items at its March 25 meeting in Orlando, Florida. These matters are additionally governed by Rule 1-12.1, Rules Regulating The Florida Bar. Most amendments to the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar that are finally acted upon by the board must still be formally filed with the Supreme Court of Florida, with further notice and opportunity to be heard, before they are officially approved and become effective.To receive a full copy of the text of any of these proposed amendments call (850)561-5751. Please reference any requested proposal by its title or item number and date of this publication. RULES REGULATING THE FLORIDA BAR Chapter 1 General Subchapter 1-3 Membership 1. Rule 1-3.7 Reinstatement to Membership Summary: Within subdivision (f)(2), clarifies that any lawyer who has not actively practiced or been in a position requiring a law license for the entire period of inactive membership must complete the basic skills course and 30 hours of continuing legal education to become eligible. Terminology changed from “attorney” to “lawyer” throughout to conform to the Supreme Court of Florida style guide. Chapter 3 Rules of DisciplineSubchapter 3-6 Employment of Certain Attorneys or Former Attorneys 2. Rule 3-6.1 Generally Summary: Adds new subdivision (d)(4) to prohibit suspended attorneys and former attorneys who have been disbarred, or whose disciplinary resignations or revocations have been allowed, from representing clients in administrative proceedings and before administrative agencies which allow non-lawyer agents or “qualified representatives” to represent clients in certain circumstances.Subchapter 3-7 Procedures 3. Rule 3-7.1 Confidentiality Summary: Adds new subdivision (l)(3) to authorize release of confidential information on pending investigations upon receipt of a signed waiver by respondents who are applying for board certification to BLSE and its committees; renumbers subdivision (l)(3) to (l)(4). 4. Rule 3-7.10 Reinstatement and Readmission Procedures Summary: Within subdivision (f)(3), clarifies that ordinary life activities do not constitute rehabilitation; within subdivision (f)(3)(G) defines community and civil service; within the comment, provides discussion and case law discussing community and civic service required for reinstatement. Chapter 4 Rules of Professional ConductSubchapter 4-6 Public Service 5. Rule 4-6.5 Voluntary Pro Bono Plan Summary: Within subdivision (b), expands the number of committee members on the Standing Committee on Pro Bono Legal Service from 20 specifically designated members to 21 specifically required members plus 4 nonspecific, at-large members for a total of no more than 25 members. Expands eligible board member appointees from current to past or current board members. Adds YLD president or designee to the list of required members. Within subdivision (c)(2)(D) and (E), deleted extraneous language and reworded for clarity and consistency. Within subdivision (d), reworded for clarity and consistency. Chapter 20 Florida Registered Paralegal ProgramSubchapter 20-3 Eligibility Requirements 6. Rule 20-3.1 Requirements for Registration Summary: Deletes subdivision (c), Grandfathering because the provision sunsets March 1, 2011. Subchapter 20-4 Registration 7. Rule 20-4.1 Generally Summary: Within subdivision (a), codifies application requirement of supplying an attestation from the current employer; Deletes subdivision (a)(3) relating to grandfathering provision that is being sunsetted; Within subdivision (e) adds introductory language noting that there are exceptions to the payment of annual renewal fee and changes annual registration to annual renewal as that is the more accurate term. Adds new subdivision (f) allowing FRPs employed by the government to pay their annual renewal in installments; adds new subdivision (g) exempting FRPs who are activated reserve members of the military from the payment of annual renewal. STANDING BOARD POLICIES 8. SBP 15.90 Review and Approval of Disciplinary Cost Payment PlansSummary: Within subdivision (a), adds “due to the Bar” to the title. Deletes subdivision (a)(2), restitution. Within subdivision (a)(3), renumbers and lowers from 90 to 30 the number of days after which diversion fees are delinquent. Deletes subdivision (a)(4), fee arbitration awards. Adds new subdivision (b) stating that restitution or arbitration awards awarded by courts of arbitration panels not paid within 30 days after the award or court order is final are payment delinquencies. Within subdivision (e) [proposed subdivision (f)] and (h) [proposed subdivision (i)] adds that review of payment plans of duration longer than one year must be reviewed by the Disciplinary Review Committee subject to final approval by the board of governors. Renumbers subsequent subdivisions accordingly. Other editorial and style changes made. SECTION BYLAWS 9. Bylaws – Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law Section S ummary: ARTICLE II• Section 2.2. replaces executive council enrollment of affiliate members with ability of affiliates themselves to join the section.• Within Article II, Section 2.2, expands category of potential affiliates to any person interested.• Within Article II, Section 2.2, (a), removes “Florida” from ABA-accredited law school to allow any student from any ABA-accredited law school to join the section.• Article II, Section 2.3, adds the phrase “for Members and for Affiliates” to those whose dues are fixed by the executive council. ARTICLE III• Within Article III, Section 3.1, (a), adds immediate past chair as an officer of the section.• Within Article III, Section 3.2, (c), adds that immediate past chair is member of executive council and may be appointed to any standing or ad hoc committee and prohibits former immediate past chair from executive council membership and from holding any section office for 2 years after his/her term as immediate past chair.• Within Article III, Section 3.2, (d) & (e), re-numbering.• Within Article III, Section 3.3, new subdivision (c), adds term of office for immediate past chair. Re-numbers subdivisions (c) and (d). ARTICLE IV• Within Article IV, Section 4.1, changes number of past chairs serving on executive council from 5 to 1.• Within Article IV, Section 4.3, adds executive council as sole authority to approve or cancel contracts on behalf of the section. Adds two weeks’ notice for submission of contracts/agreements to council. Adds authority of executive council to determine matters of policy regarding sponsorship benefits, complimentary or discount participation at seminars or events and other matters affecting income and expenses. Adds expenditures over $250 may not be made without prior council approval.• Within Article IV, Section 4.4, removes “correspondence.” Adds video conferencing. Prohibits proxy voting. Allows voting in-person, telephonically. or by email, except for annual executive council meeting. ARTICLE VII• Within Article VII, Section 7.1, requires members to be present to vote at the section’s annual meeting.• Within Article VII, Section 7.2, requires that annual executive council meeting take place immediately prior to the section’s annual meeting and requires that members be physically present to vote.• Adds Article VII, Section 7.4 requiring Roberts Rules of Order to govern conduct of council meetings. ARTICLE VIII• Adds Article VIII requiring that the section listserv adhere to existing written policies and that the written policies must be prominently displayed on the section’s website. Adds that violation of listserv rules will result in removal from listserv. ARTICLE IX• This article was previously numbered Article VIII. Adds 15-day written notice re bylaw amendments. ARTICLE X• This article was previously numbered Article IX. Section’s renumbered to 10.1 through 10.4.• Within Article X, Section 10.2 (a), adds council must pre-approve expenses in order to be reimbursed.• Adds Article X, Section 10.2 (b) prohibits section members from negotiating or signing facility contracts and provides that contracts executed without prior executive council and Florida Bar approval are unauthorized and will be the personal responsibility of the executor.• Adds Article X, Section 10.4 requiring uniform application of all fees and charges. 10. Real Property, Probate & Trust Law Section BylawsARTICLE I – NAME AND PURPOSES Section 1. Name. Makes minor style change. Section 2. Purposes. Reorganizes and makes stylistic edits for greater clarity.Clarifies that the purview of the section extends to fields of law that are related to real property, probate and trust law, such as guardianship law. Clarifies that construction law is within the scope of real property law. Places a greater emphasis on section service to the public.ARTICLE II – SECTION MEMBERSHIP Section 1. Membership Types. Makes stylistic edits throughout for greater clarity.Subdivision (a) adds language to provide that if an active section member ceases to be a member of the section because the member is no longer a member of The Florida Bar in good standing, reinstatement as a member of The Florida Bar in good standing shall automatically reinstate the person as an active section member, provided that the member is current in the payment of section dues. Subdivision (d) moved to new Section 4 (see below) Section 2. Membership Year. Makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Section 3. Dues. Makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Section 4. Membership Standards. [ New, moved from Section 2.(d)] Title added and adds “misconduct involving moral turpitude” to the grounds for which section membership may be terminated by two-thirds vote of the executive council at an in-state meeting after notice and opportunity to be heard. Stylistic edits for greater clarity.ARTICLE III – ORGANIZATION Reorganizes and makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Adds references to section liaisons, who are members of the executive council.ARTICLE IV – OFFICERS, ELECTED POSITIONS, AND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Section 1. Officers. Makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Changes circuit representatives to at-large-members (See Article V for further explanation). Changes circuit representatives director to at-large-members director. Recognizes that there can be more than one representative for out-of-state members. Section 2. Qualifications. Clarifies that no person may serve as a section officer, representative for out-of-state members, or at-large-member unless they are an active section member and that the loss of that status shall cause the office or position to be vacant. Provides that, if the status as an active section member ceases because of a loss of status as a member of The Florida Bar in good standing that is solely attributable to a delinquency in (i) the payment of membership fees or dues; or (ii) completing continuing legal education requirements, reinstatement as a member of The Florida Bar in good standing and as an active section member shall automatically reinstate the member to the vacant office or position if it has not been filled. Section 3. Executive Committee. Reorganizes and makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Provides that the executive committee shall have “authority to exercise the function of the executive council when and to the extent authorized by the executive council with respect to a specific matter, and on any other matter which the executive committee reasonably determines requires action between meetings of the executive council.” Current bylaws provide that the executive committee has the “authority to take emergency action on behalf of the executive council between regular executive council meetings.” Requires that all action taken by the executive committee on behalf of the executive council be reported to the executive council at its next meeting.Provides that the executive committee shall make recommendations for consideration by the chair-elect in appointing chairs and vice chairs of section committees and section liaisons. Provides that the executive committee shall make recommendations for consideration by the long-range planning committee in submitting nominees for at-large-members. Section 4. Nominating Procedure. Reorganizes and makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Changes circuit representatives to at-large-members (See Article V for further explanation). Changes circuit representatives director to at-large-members director. Recognizes that there can be more than one representative for out-of-state members.Provides that, if the office of chair-elect becomes vacant during the year, the nominations submitted by the long-range planning committee for the following year shall include a nominee for the office of section chair. Provides that, in submitting nominations for at-large-members, the long-range planning committee shall consider recommendations from the at-large-members director and the executive committee. Increases from ten to twenty-five, the minimum number of section members needed to make nominations for any elected section office or position in addition to the nominations made by the long-range planning committee. Section 5. Election and Term of Offices and Positions. Reorganizes and makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Changes circuit representatives to at-large-members (See Article V for further explanation). Recognizes that there can be more than one representative for out-of-state members. Requires that the election meeting for the election of officers, representatives for out-of-state members, and at-large-members, be held prior to July 1 of each year. Provides that the one year term of persons elected to an office or position shall begin on July 1. Current bylaws provide that the term begins at the conclusion of the annual convention of The Florida Bar. Section 6. Duties of Officers. Provides several refinements and clarifications in the duties of section officers. Provides that the at-large-members director shall have responsibility for the at-large-member and shall provide recommendations to the long-range planning committee for nominating at-large-members nominees, define the responsibilities of the at-large-members, and evaluate their performance. Section 7. Vacancies. Establishes rules and procedures for filling vacancies in section offices and eliminates conflicting provisions contained in current bylaws. Provides that a vacancy in the office of section chair shall be filled by the chair-elect.Provides that, in the event of a vacancy in the office of chair-elect, the duties of that office shall be assumed by the chair and a new chair shall be elected at next election meeting. Provides that, in the event of vacancies in the offices of both chair and chair-elect, the long-range planning committee shall select a chair, who shall also assume the duties of the chair-elect, and that a new chair and chair-elect shall be elected at next election meeting. Provides that vacancies in any other office which occur within six weeks of the next in-state executive council meeting shall be filled by the executive council at that meeting. If the vacancy occurs more than six weeks prior to such a meeting, the vacancy shall be filled by the executive committee. Provides that vacancies in the positions of member-at-large or representative for out-of-state members shall be filled by the chair.ARTICLE V – EXECUTIVE COUNCIL Section 1. Powers and Duties. Reorganizes and makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Section 2. Membership. Makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Clarifies that vice chairs of section committees and section liaisons are executive council members. Authorizes more than one representative for out-of-state members. Changes circuit representatives to at-large-members. Changes circuit representatives director to at-large-members director. Section 3. At-Large-Members and Regional Representation. Reorganizes and makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Provides that the at-large-members category of executive council membership is intended to help the section achieve its goal of maintaining active, productive members on the executive council, while preserving regional representation. To be considered for nomination as an at-large-member, prospective members must demonstrate the willingness and ability, through previous committee leadership or otherwise, to assist the section with its needs. It is anticipated that the existence of the at-large-members category of membership will facilitate a more efficient and effective allocation of resources within the executive council.Provides that, to the extent that section officers, chairs and vice chairs of section committees, section liaisons, and representatives for the out-of-state members of the section serving on the executive council do not include geographical representation from each judicial circuit and outside of Florida, the at-large-members should include such representation when reasonably practicable. The current bylaws require at least one circuit representative from each judicial circuit. Section 4. Attendance. Reorganizes and makes stylistic edits for greater clarity.Increases the procedural requirements that must be complied with to reestablish executive council membership following an automatic resignation resulting from a failure to comply with the mandatory attendance requirement for executive council meetings.ARTICLE VI – SECTION COMMITTEES AND LIAISONS Section 1. Committees. Makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Gives the section chair the authority to dissolve section committees and eliminate section liaison positions. Section 2. Section Committee Chairs and Liaisons. Makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Gives the chair-elect the authority to appoint committee chairs, committee vice chairs, and section liaisons for the coming year during which the chair-elect will serve as section chair. Gives the section chair the authority to remove committee chairs, committee vice chairs, and section liaisons, and to fill vacancies in those positions. Section 3. Committee Members. Gives committee chairs the authority to appoint and remove members to and from section committees. Section 4. Section Membership Requirement. Provides that no person may serve as a (i) chair, vice chair, or voting member of any section committee; or (ii) section liaison, unless they are an active section member, and that the loss of that status shall cause the position to be vacant. Further provides that if status of an active section member ceases because of a loss of status as a member of The Florida Bar in good standing that is solely attributable to a delinquency in (i) the payment of membership fees or dues; or (ii) completing continuing legal education requirements, reinstatement as a member of The Florida Bar in good standing and as an active section member shall automatically reinstate the member to the vacant position if it has not been filled. Section 5. Committee Reports. Requires that the chairs of section committees provide annual reports to the executive committee and clarifies the confidential status of those reports.ARTICLE VII – MEETINGS Section 1. Annual/Election Meeting of the Section. Makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Requires that the annual election meeting of the section be held prior to July 1 of each year and provides that voting by proxy is not permitted at that meeting. Section 2. Executive Council Meetings. Makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Clarifies that the executive council must conduct at least three in-state meetings each year. Provides that voting by proxy at executive council meetings is not permitted. Authorizes the executive council to transact business by voting on matters electronically. Section 3. Executive Committee Meetings. Makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Provides that the chair shall fix the date and location and give notice of meetings of the executive committee, and requires that it hold an organizational meeting prior to the beginning of each membership year. Provides that voting by proxy at executive committee meetings is not permitted. Provides that the executive committee may also take action by mail, e-mail, or telephone. New Section 4. Conduct of Meetings. Provides that, in conducting meetings of the section and its subdivisions, provisions contained in these bylaws shall prevail over any conflicting provision in Robert’s Rules of Order, and that the section chair may appoint a parliamentarian to advise and assist the section chair or any other person presiding over a meeting of the section or any of its subdivisions in connection with any procedural issues that may arise. Provides that persons who are not members of the executive council may address the executive council at meetings only with the permission of the section chair or by vote of two-thirds of the members of the executive council present (without debate). (Moved from Article IX, Section 6.)ARTICLE VIII – LEGISLATIVE, ADMINISTRATIVE, AND JUDICIAL POSITIONS Streamlines, simplifies, and substantially revises in its entirety. Section 1. Authority. Provides that the section may be involved in legislative, administrative, and judicial (including amicus curiae and court rule) activities that are within the purview of the section, provided that those activities are consistent with the purposes of the section and the policies promulgated by the board of governors, both of which are incorporated into this section). Section 2. Section Positions. Implements new terminology of “section position,” which includes all legislative, administrative, or judicial (including amicus curiae and court rule) positions, and establishes a uniform procedure for the adoption of all section positions. Section 3. Legislation Committee. Eliminates the legislation review committee as unnecessary, and provides for only one legislation committee, composed of a committee chair, a vice chair for real property, a vice chair for probate and trust, the section chair, the section chair-elect, the director of the real property law division, the director of the probate and trust law division, and such other members of the executive council as are appointed by the chair of the legislation committee with the approval of the section chair. Section 4. Procedures for Adopting and Reporting Section Positions. Requires that a proposed section position be included on the agenda for the executive council meeting and that supporting documentation be distributed to the executive council at least one week prior to the executive council meeting, unless those requirements are waived by two-thirds of the members of the executive council present at that meeting. Provides that the adoption of a section position requires that two-thirds of the executive council members present at the meeting approve it and find that it is within the purview of the section, as defined in section 1 of this article. Further provides that voting by proxy is not permitted. Provides that, in those circumstances where the executive committee is authorized to adopt a section position because time constraints do not permit action by the executive council, approval of the section position requires a two-thirds vote of the executive committee. Further provides that the adoption of a section position by the executive committee shall be reported to the executive council at its next meeting. Requires that written notice of the adoption of a section position be promptly given to The Florida Bar and circulated for comment to all divisions, sections, and committees of The Florida Bar that are believed to be interested in the matter.Provides that a section position may not be advanced by the section unless it has been submitted to, and not disapproved by, the board of governors. Provides that a section position shall remain in force for the current biennial legislative session unless rescinded by the board of governors. Provides that the section shall not participate as an amicus curiae without the consent of the board of governors. Requires that section positions shall be clearly identified as positions of the section, and not those of The Florida Bar. Section 5. Expenses Incurred in Advancing Section Positions. Provides that if the section lobbyist or section chair requests the appearance of a section member to advance a section position, the member’s reasonable expenses shall be paid by the section in accordance with its budgetary policies. Section 6. Section Lobbyist. Makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Provides that the section may retain a lobbyist to assist the section in its legislative activities or matters, subject to the approval of the board of governors. Eliminates unnecessary provisions concerning the furnishing of information, budgeting, and payments to a section lobbyist.ARTICLE IX – MISCELLANEOUS Section 1. Integrity of Section Proceedings. Disclosure of Conflict and Recusal.Includes an ethics and conflict of interest policy requiring disclosure and possible recusal by section members from participation in section proceedings on matters where facts or circumstances exist that would reasonably bring into question an accusation that a section member is biased, prejudiced, or possesses a conflict of interest with respect to that matter. Section 2. Action of The Florida Bar. Renumbered with no substantive change. Section 3. Compensation and Expenses. Continues current prohibition on salary or compensation paid to any section member, while allowing reimbursement of reasonable and necessary expenses. Eliminates the current bylaw requirement of obtaining specific authorization for reimbursements from the section chair and treasurer or the executive council. Section 4. Policies of the Section. Makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Eliminates current bylaw provision that all prior policies adopted by the section shall be rescinded by these bylaws. Section 5. Amendments. Makes stylistic edits for greater clarity. Section 6. Conduct of Meetings. (Moved to Article VII. Section 4.) Section 6. Notice. (New) Provides that any bylaw requirement that notice, information, or materials be furnished may be satisfied by (i) any method of delivery specified in the requirement; (ii) transmitting the notice, information or materials by e-mail to any email address provided by the recipient to The Florida Bar; or (iii) posting the notice, information, or materials to the section’s website and notifying the member of the posting by e-mail to any e-mail address provided by the recipient to The Florida Bar. Section 7. Effective Date. (New) Provides that these bylaws shall be effective as of July 1, 2010, or upon their adoption by the executive council, or upon their approval by the board of governors, whichever occurs later. Provides that upon these revised and restated bylaws becoming effective, each existing circuit representative shall automatically become an at-large-member, and the existing circuit representatives director shall automatically become the at-large-members director.last_img read more

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Commercial Properties Inc., secures 22,112 SF for Brookwood Commerce Centre

first_imgCommercial Properties Inc., Arizona’s largest locally owned commercial real estate brokerage, is pleased to announce the lease of 22,112 SF of office space at Brookwood Commerce Centre located at 4425 West Olive Avenue in Glendale, Arizona.  Eric Butler of CPI’s Scottsdale Office represented the landlord, 4425 W Olive Ave LLC, in this transaction.  Brookwood Commerce Centre is a 209,174 SF multi-tenant office building near the corner of 43rd Avenue and West Dunlap Avenue.According to Eric Butler, “The tenant, Empact-SPC has been committed to working with public and private partners to solve community problems for more than 40 years.  They provide community and cultural education to make all our communities safer, stronger and healthier using their expertise to address behavioral health, housing, family and children’s services, employment and crisis intervention issues.”Eric may be contacted for additional information at 480.522.2788.last_img read more

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Westview Mobile Home and RV Park sells for $1M

first_imgPark Brokerage Inc. has sold Westview Mobile Home and RV Park located at 6331 W Glendale Avenue in Glendale, Arizona was completed on October 13, 2015 for the price of $1,000,000.  John Sheedy with Park Brokerage Inc. negotiated the transaction on behalf of the sellers 6331 W Glendale LLC and procured the buyer Westview Park LLC.Westview is an all ages permanent resident mobile home and RV park on 2.5 acres with 33 singlewide/park model spaces and four apartment units and was 94% occupied at closing.  The seller did not rent any of the mobile homes which make it an attractive asset in manufactured housing market.  Space rents are $300 per month and have not been raised in over 9 years which is low for the Glendale market especially with Glendale Avenue frontage.  Lot sizes at Westview are small and do not fit modern mobile homes so park model occupancy is likely going forward at the park.  The park is on city utilities and electricity is direct billed to each site by APS.  There is no rent control in Glendale or Maricopa County.  The buyer obtained a new loan from Alaska Federal Credit Union at favorable terms.  The park was in above average condition and closed at a projected 10.5% capitalization rate however income and expenses were difficult to verify.John Sheedy who brokered the deal said about the property that “this park is easy keep full with tenants with it’s direct access to Glendale and being across the street from the local high school.  The buyer plans on utilizing new management to change some of the older administrative systems currently in place.  Raising rents to market could also give buyer an even more outstanding return.  The park also has redevelopment options in the future being directly on Glendale Avenue”last_img read more

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NEWS SCAN: H5N1 case in Egypt, bird outbreak in India, debate in Indonesia

first_imgJan 19, 2010Egypt reports human H5N1 case, more bird infectionsEgypt has identified its 91st human case of H5N1 avian influenza, according to a Jan 13 report by Strengthening Avian Influenza Detection and Response (SAIDR), an Egypt-based project funded by the US Agency for International Development. The Egyptian health ministry said the case involves a 20-year-old woman from Beni Suef governorate who fell ill Jan 6, was hospitalized, and was reported to be in stable condition on Jan 13. Her family said she had had contact with sick and dead poultry. Meanwhile, Egypt’s Ministry of Agriculture and Land Reclamation today reported 17 detections of H5N1 cases in household birds in eight governorates, according to a separate SAIDR report. Officials said the number of findings was a result of the strengthening of passive surveillance in veterinary clinics.H5N1 hits India’s West Bengal stateAnimal health officials in India confirmed an H5N1 avian influenza outbreak in backyard birds in three villages in the country’s West Bengal state, according to a Jan 15 report from the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). The outbreak, India’s first since October 2009, killed 1,000 of about 80,000 susceptible birds in the three Murshidabad district villages. The remaining birds and those in a 3-kilometer radius around the area were culled to prevent the spread of the virus. The government will compensate owners for the poultry. Veterinary authorities are conducting intensive surveillance in areas within 10 kilometers of the outbreak site. They have also closed poultry markets in the area and have prohibited the sale and transport of birds. Investigators haven’t yet determined the source of the virus. West Bengal is in eastern India near its border with Bangladesh.Jan 15 OIE reportIndonesia’s H5N1 status debated as outbreak reportedHealth and agriculture officials in Indonesia say fewer H5N1 outbreaks in poultry may have decreased the number of infections in humans, but other experts say the risk has not changed and that the country’s poultry surveillance system is weak, the United Nations Integrated Regional Information Networks (IRIN) reported yesterday. Indonesian Health Minister Endang Rahayu Sedyaningsih said there have been no human illnesses since November 2009, and Agus Wiyono, the agriculture ministry’s director of animal health, said no major poultry outbreaks have occurred in 3 years. But Dr Chairil Nidom, a microbiologist at Airlangga University in Surabaya, Indonesia, said some poultry outbreaks have probably gone unreported and that the surveillance system is weak. A World Health Organization (WHO) spokesman told IRIN that the group’s assessment of Indonesia’s risk has not changed. The country leads the world in human H5N1 infections and deaths. The mixed assessments of Indonesia’s risk came as veterinary officials in East Java reported that the virus recently struck chickens in a village, which led to the culling of 270 birds, Indonesia’s Antara news agency reported today. Rapid-test results on 100 birds were positive, an official from Pamekasan regency’s veterinary health office told the news service.Jan 18 IRIN storyJan 19 Antara storylast_img read more

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Debate Flares Over AI To Detect COVID-19 In Lung Scans

first_imgMedical staff perform a CT scan of a Covid-19 patient at Red Cross Hospital in Wuhan, China. STR/AFP/Getty ImagesHSNW News:A series of studies, starting as a steady drip and quickening to a deluge, has reported the same core finding amid the global spread of COVID-19: Artificial intelligence could analyze chest images to accurately detect the disease in legions of untested patients.Casey Ross writes in STAT that the results promised a ready solution to the shortage of diagnostic testing in the U.S. and some other countries and triggered splashy press releases and a cascade of hopeful headlines. But in recent days, the initial burst of optimism has given way to an intensifying debate over the plausibility of building AI systems during an unprecedented public health emergency.Source: homelandsecuritynewswire.comlast_img read more

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Gastech: Unprecedented Opportunities in LNG Shipping

first_img[mappress]Source: Gastech, March 25, 2014 Delegates to Gastech 2014 were told that there were enormous growth opportunities with the development of new technology and improved safety measures. “Today’s growth is completely unprecedented,” said Andrew Clifton, General Manager for the Society for International Gas Tanker and Terminal Operators. “We have more ships and terminals than ever before, and we currently have 400 vessels with over 100 more on order,” he said. “Within 3 to 4 years, we’ll have a fleet of over 500 LNG vessels in service. It’s certainly worth mentioning that, as recently as 1997, there were only 100 vessels in service.”Tamunoiyala Koko, Team Leader – Halifax for Lloyd’s Register, presented his risk assessment for LNGC ships transiting through the Panama Canal after the Panama Canal expansion project, which will accommodate most of the world’s LNG fleet and larger ships, and is expected to be completed in July 2015. “The HAZID project takes into account all credible scenarios and accidental evidence such as human error, mechanical failures, communications errors, extreme weather, and other possibilities,” Koko said. These incidents can result in possible LNGC ship grounding, and collision with other passing ships, including large vessels. The study was carried out from February 28 to March 2, 2012, looking at up to 170,000 cubic meter capacity ships with an estimated 100 LNG vessel transiting through the Panama Canal each year once the expansion is completed. “All of the scenarios considered had at most a medium risk,” he said. This risk is acceptable if sufficient controls are in place, according to the study. For 7 out of 11 medium risk hazards, no additional controls were necessary.KH Joh, Principal Engineer at Samsung Heavy Industries, introduced his company’s new membrane-type cargo containment system for LNG tankers, which has received approval in principle and general design approval from classification societies. The new design includes a reinforced corrugated primary membrane and more robust secondary membranes made of stainless steel for improved containment system integrity. The structural capacity for the sloshing load is enhanced, reducing the cargo filling limit. The new system will “increase the transportation efficiency” and “improve operational flexibility” for LNG carriers and offshore floating vessels, Joh said.Choi DongKyu, Deputy Director and Head of the Energy System R&D Team at Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering, discussed MEGI propulsion for LNG carriers, calling it an attractive way for achieving high fuel efficiency. “The system minimizes the conversion loss since the MEGI engine directly drives the propeller without any energy conversion. Despite its higher fuel efficiency, the system does have a disadvantage, requiring high pressure for fuel gas,” he said. Some amount of BOG must be left in the tank because of the low fuel consumption of MEGI consumption.Delegates who opened the Gastech 2014 technical stream conference on Tuesday morning paid their respects to Robert J. Lakey, Gastech’s longest-serving chairman, who passed away this year.last_img read more

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