Ecosummit Berlin: Dutch startup to crowdfund solar in the European market

first_imgEcosummit Berlin: Dutch startup to crowdfund solar in the European marketThe Amsterdam-based team is developing a platform that will offer virtual net metering, allowing investors to compare the production of their share of solar installations against their domestic electricity production. June 5, 2014 Jonathan Gifford Events Finance Manufacturing Markets Markets & Policy Share Two young Dutch entrepreneurs are hoping to introduce the crowdfunding of solar PV installations to the continental European market. We Share Solar is part of the Rockstart Smart Energy Startups accelerator and hopes to launch its online crowdfunding portal next month. Matthijs Olieman and Sven Pluut are the co-founders of We Share Solar (Zonne Panelen Delen) and they appear to be demonstrating the old adage that necessity is the mother of invention. In the face of a commercial rooftop financing environment in the Netherlands, largely due to a lack of subsidy programs or net metering provisions, the two entrepreneurs are pursuing the crowdfunding model to bring down the cost of capital for larger-scale PV. “If you look at solar energy systems themselves and the business model, the payback time for large scale solar energy systems is pretty long, up to 20 years — large scale being more than 50 kW,” said Olieman. “Anything more than 50 kW, you just get the wholesale price for your PV electricity.” Olieman’s background is as a solar project developer, having founded a company to develop and install projects in 2009. With We Share Solar, he and partner Pluut have now funded the first rooftop PV installation at a Dutch football ground. Earlier this year, the two crowdfunded the two-stage 295 kW project at FC Groningen (pictured). Olieman said that was proof of concept for We Share Solar’s business model. ZnShine provided the modules for the project and Kaco the inverters. “We created a new entity called Foundation One Million Watt, which is the project owner itself, which issued bonds to the investors,” said Olieman. “The return on the bond is based on two things, the production of the solar installation and the average electricity price on the market. If the average price goes up, then your return goes up, because your produced electricity is sold for more.” The Dutch version of We Share Solar’s web platform is set be delivered in one month’s time and the Amsterdam-based team is developing functionality that will allow a large number of small investors to compare the production of their share of the solar installation against their domestic electricity production — a kind of virtual net metering. “We first want to get people into our system to provide a platform to buy a solar panel on another roof, but we also hope that once they are in there that they will participate in other projects and maybe even in the future they can participate in other kinds of renewable energy projects.” Crowdfunded PV arrays are certainly not new — U.S. company Mosaic has been in the space for some time. We Share Solar claims that its offering is differentiated from Mosaic in the floating return for investors and unique investor platform. The We Share Solar team hopes to roll out its platform in the Netherlands, then the U.K. and Germany. Olieman and Pluut pitched the startup at the recent Ecosummit in Berlin and generated some interest from German investors looking to roll out the model in the German market sooner rather than later. “There are people in Germany excited by the concept, so we may even move into the German market sooner than we thought we would,” said Olieman. We Share Solar is currently looking for an investment of €300,000 ($408,511) to develop its platform and to invest in marketing. Certainly Holland is a difficult market for any downstream solar provider or service to prospect but We Share Solar claims to have a pipeline of seven projects ready to attract crowdfunded capital. And Olieman remains optimistic. “We’re starting in the Netherlands because we come from the Netherlands and also because if we can do it there, we can do it anywhere.”Popular content The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. 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Women discuss surviving domestic violence at St. Peter’s panel

first_img Bayonne 2-alarm fire leaves six people displaced, one suffers minor injuries, fire chief says Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Bayonne November 2, 2017 10:43 pm at 10:43 pm CarePoint Health reaches deal for Cigna Health Insurance to join their network Facebook Twitter TAGSguarini institutemargaret abramsPamela Johnsonsandra cunninghamst. peter’s university SHARE Carman RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR 2 COMMENTS CommunityJersey City Hoboken man killed in motorcycle crash on N.J. Turnpike in Kearny, state police say Esther Suarez was supposed to be the first speaker, and I did see her there, but I did not catch her remarks because I was covering another event prior and could not get there for the very beginning. Women discuss surviving domestic violence at St. Peter’s panel Comments are closed. Community Several female community leaders gathered at St. Peter’s University on Monday evening to discuss how to avoid and survive instances of domestic violence. [fve]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3r2p74gYb6Q&feature=youtu.be[/fve]State Senator Sandra Cunningham (D-31) explained that we need to teach people to love themselves so that they won’t tolerate being abused by a partner.Cathy DeFazio McBride, the mother of fallen Jersey City Police Det. Melvin Santiago, spoke in detail about the chaotic relationship she had with her ex-husband.“In 2010, my husband punched me in the face and was choking me … I knew my jaw was hurt but I was scared to get checked,” recalled McBride.“This man fractured my jaw and I still felt that I had to protect him.During the panel discussion, Guarini Institute Executive Director Dr. Leila Sadeghi asked what traits are associated with the captivity aspect of abusive relationships.WomenRising Director of Domestic Violence Margaret Abrams said victims are typically isolated from family, friends and extracurricular activities by their partner.Beth Adubato, an assistant professor of criminal justice at Saint Peter’s University, reiterated that point by telling a story of a Seton Hall law student whose boyfriend would not let her leave their apartment unless it was to go to class.“She told us that for two years, her boyfriend would not let her leave their apartment – except for when she went to class. She had no friends, wasn’t allowed to talk to anyone, not allowed to tell her parents,” Adubato said, noting that it does no good to blame the victim since everyone’s circumstances are different.Additionally, Jersey City Anti-Violence Coalition Movement Executive Director Pamela Johnson (also a Ward A council candidate) recalled a brutal beating she received at the hands of her daughter’s father.“One night, where I came in, it was that jealousy thing. Someone saw me at the hair salon talking to a gentleman. And he wanted to know who he was. And before I could answer, my head was through a china closet,” stated Johnson.“And after that, he stabbed me, repeatedly. And even though I walked out, I dragged myself out, but I got out, but the signs are not always a hit or a slap. Sometimes it’s the control. Sometimes it’s the ‘baby I love you because you’re so beautiful.’”Assistant Hudson County Prosecutor Najma Rana, Sarah’s Daughters Domestic Violence Awareness Foundation Founder Rev. Bertha Reels and Sarah Davis, a corrections officer at the Edna Mahon Correctional Facility for Women also joined the panel.The event was a joint effort between the Guarini Institute for Government and Leadership and the Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office and October is domestic violence awareness month. Bayonne By John Heinis – November 1, 2017 6:15 pm 2 John Heinis Previous articlePolice: Despite some Halloween hijinks, no arrests in BayonneNext articleLETTER: Team Bhalla is the best choice for Hoboken, Zimmer says John Heinis Did the prosecutors office say anything? This gives an impression that the discussion was telling women to love themselves which doesn’t help us understand all of the violent deaths of women this year. This is either a problem in the reporting or in the event, which was it? November 3, 2017 1:08 am at 1:08 amlast_img read more

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Refining wheelchair restraints at Unwin training

first_imgSecuring wheelchairs and their users is something that must be done properly, every time. To help its customers do just that, Unwin holds regular training sessions at its Martock, Somerset headquartersUnwin’s training is hands-on and it attracts a variety of participantsSecuring a wheelchair user is among the most important jobs that drivers of minibuses undertake, but have yours been given sufficient training to ensure that they do so correctly?The answer to that may be no, because sessions held by accessible transport solutions specialist Unwin demonstrate that it is far from a straightforward task. That may come as a surprise to some, but the consequences can be disastrous if things go wrong because of a driver’s lack of knowledge.Unwin carries out comprehensive training on wheelchair and occupant securement at its Martock premises in Somerset; it can also be held an operator’s base.Training is handled in an adult and comprehensive manner. The course is suitable for drivers, and it is also something that managers may benefit from attending too, along with individuals who are designated depot trainers.Separate sessions on Unwin’s range of lifts are also offered, with dates usually based around customers’ requirements.At the beginningCorrect use of wheelchair and occupant securing equipment is covered during the tuition, but the day begins with a look at what’s important before staff are let loose with webbing, karabiners, seatbelts and more.“Drivers need good communication skills, and not just with passengers. They must also be able to speak effectively to parents or carers,” says Unwin Marketing Co-Ordinator Florence Vaughan-France.The importance of that is reinforced during the training, which Florence leads. Other relevant topics include the need not to invade a passenger’s personal space, and ensuring that they are not touched in a manner that could be construed as inappropriate.“Drivers should talk to the passenger, and not their parent or carer. They should also bear in mind that their own safety is just as important as that of passengers, because if the driver is injured, everyone on the minibus is in trouble,” she adds.Participant numbers are limited, allowing most value to be taken from dayVarious other things should also be considered. If securing equipment was in use in a vehicle that was involved in an accident, it could be damaged without it being obvious. As a result, all such items should not merely be discarded; they should be destroyed to prevent re-use.Additionally, the importance of correctly stowing equipment when it is not required is emphasised. Items are not designed to be left in tracking rails when they are not needed, and damage may result if they are.Getting it doneWith the basics covered, talk moves on to the practical aspects of securing wheelchairs and their users correctly.What may not be fully appreciated by all drivers is that they have a legal requirement to ensure that passengers are restrained effectively. Should the worst happen, they could potentially find themselves explaining in court why they had failed to do so.Detailed instructions are given on how to correctly secure wheelchairs and their users with Unwin’s products, and participants can also see exactly how those items are manufactured.Hands-on experience comes through the opportunity to practice using a number of demonstration chairs mounted on tracking-equipped boards, along with live volunteers.That gives the chance to gain knowledge of best practice for Unwin’s range of tie-downs: The standard model, the Quattro and Quattro Express retractable and self-retracting variants respectively, and the high-capacity Titan.The latter is a six-point set-up able to secure wheelchairs that (without the occupant) weigh up to 200kg. Both Quattro models come in 100kg and 120kg four-point layouts and they are compatible with the tongue and buckle, karabiner, and hook methods of attaching webbing to the wheelchair. Titan works only with a karabiner.Importance of correctly stowing and maintaining equipment is stressedAlso examined are combined wheelchair and occupant restraint systems, along with stand-alone seatbelts for the user. Course participants are encouraged to get their hands dirty and practice with all of these items.Why attend?2017’s final training session was held in November. It attracted a full house; Unwin restricts attendee numbers to 12 to ensure that all participants can gain hands-on experience.November’s delegates were a mixed bunch. Some were drivers, but others included local authority representatives, and also two managers from a company that handles one council’s accessible minibus work on an outsourced basis.The training is just as relevant for these managers as it is for drivers. As it includes elements of legislation, it gives an opportunity for them to ensure their operation’s compliance, allowing them to reassure more senior staff that the day-to-day operation is on track legally.Additionally, it gives the opportunity to share best practice with, and learn from, others. As an example, one topic of debate centred on what actions the driver should take when a passenger refuses to co-operate with the requirement for them and their wheelchair to be secured.That was just one point of discussion, illustrating that Unwin’s training is a valuable opportunity to stay up-to-date on what is a subject of vital importance for operators of accessible minibuses.Unwin will hold further training sessions, on both wheelchair and user securement and lift operation, throughout 2018. If you are interested in attending, email [email protected] for more information.last_img read more

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Mammaw Earnhardt makes Harvick feel the pressure

first_imgThis was news to Harvick, who was quick to react, complete with emoji. Kevin Harvick is a Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series champion, a four-time winner already in the 2018 season and the most recent race winner Sunday at Dover International Speedway. Safe to say he’s used to pressure and to meeting those expectations.But a seemingly sweet and innocent tweet from Dale Earnhardt Jr. on Tuesday led to Harvick admitting that even he sometimes feels the burden to do well for others.Specifically, for Mammaw.Martha (Mammaw) Earnhardt, Dale Jr.’s grandmother and the mother of Dale Earnhardt, visited Junior’s newborn daughter, Isla, and happened to mention that she still watches every Monster Energy Series race and still pulls for Harvick, who drove for Richard Childress Racing in the renumbered No. 29 car after Earnhardt was killed in a 2001 wreck in the Daytona 500. Harvick was asked about this on Friday at Kansas Speedway and smiled widely as he talked about it.“Seeing the reaction from a lot of fans is a lot of responsibility, honestly. As I said on the show Tuesday night (“Happy Hours” on SiriusXM NASCAR Radio), when you look at the Earnhardt family in general, the legacy they have in our sport. … it’s a major backbone of what has happened in this sport,” Harvick said.“When you look at that, I feel like I have a small part of where that changed, took place and where it’s going.“For me, there’s a lot of pressure but also a lot of pride in that as well, trying to do right, whether it’s for the family or those old Senior fans, you want to do to the right thing. I haven’t always done the right thing but I feel like as you go through the years you transition more into the right direction than you did in the beginning so for me, personally, that feels good.”Harvick, of course, honored Earnhardt earlier this year after he won in Atlanta, the same track where he earned his first premier series win in his third career start in the series.Contributing: NASCAR Wire Servicelast_img read more

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Two Gander Truck teams issued L1 penalties before Talladega race

first_imgTwo Gander RV & Outdoors Truck Series teams were issued L1 penalties ahead of Saturday’s Chevrolet Silverado 250 at Talladega Superspeedway (1 p.m. ET on FS1, MRN, SiriusXM NASCAR Radio).RELATED: Truck Series standings | Talladega scheduleThe No. 52 Halmar Friesen Racing Toyota driven by Stewart Friesen and the No. 9 CR7 Motorsports Chevrolet driven by Codie Rohrbaugh were penalized for violating Section 20.4.12.c Bed Cover. (Note: Vent holes at the truck bed top must be configured for air intake only.)As a result, the Nos. 52 and 9 trucks were penalized 20 driver and 20 owner points, and the crew chiefs (Trip Bruce III for the No. 52 and Doug George for the No. 9) were suspended for today’s race. Jon Leonard and Mark Huff will serve as crew chiefs for the No. 52 and No. 9 teams, respectively, at Talladega.Before the penalties, Friesen was 14th in points and Rohrbaugh was 21st. The penalty will drop each back a spot to 15th and 22nd, respectively, going into Saturday’s race.last_img read more

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Incoming freshmen exceed expectations

first_imgLast fall, many members of the applicant pool for Notre Dame’s Class of 2017 boasted the stellar test scores and transcripts up to the Irish standard, so the Office of Undergraduate Admissions needed to go a step beyond academic evaluation when selecting the 2,074 members now enrolled as freshmen. Don Bishop, associate vice president for undergraduate enrollment, said the office adopted a “holistic admissions process” to examine not just the results of applicants’ endeavors, but also the motivations behind their success. “We believe that we have a better admissions process if we understand the context of a student’s success and not just whether they succeeded or not,” Bishop said. “As we read the files, it was very apparent that high credentials alone didn’t gain admission [for an individual student]. We wanted to understand their motivation to succeed.” Bishop said the applicant pool increased by 4 percent overall, and the top portion of the pool increased by 15 percent, giving the office an opportunity for greater selectivity than what the initial 4 percent suggests. “This year, I think there was a greater qualitative review of people’s quantitative success,” he said. This qualitative evaluation centered on the applicant essay and recommendations from teachers and guidance counselors, director for admissions Bob Mundy said. The most attractive candidates were those whose essays showed a depth of thought and character and then were accompanied by recommendations that reinforced this impression, he said. “It’s that intrinsic motivation that we’re trying to get at,” Mundy said. “The challenge is, as the applicant pool gets stronger and stronger, how do we separate students when you’re looking at pretty modest differences in some of the academic measures?” These academic measures include a median best SAT score of 1440 and a median best ACT score of 33, according to data provided by Bishop. Forty-nine percent of the class had SAT or ACT scores ranking in the top 1 percent of the nation, and 50 percent ranked in the top 2 percent of their high school classes. Beyond these standardized measures, the office noted that 90 percent of this class participated in community service, compared to 75 percent in the past. In their high schools, 34 percent held leadership positions in student government, 40 percent participated in the performing arts and 77 percent played a varsity sport. Bishop said he attributes the increased number of qualified applicants to the ongoing recruitment efforts by the Office of Admissions. “We developed more of a long-term relationship with prospective students,” he said. “We tend to now be engaging them over a two- to three-year period instead of just the year that they’re up for consideration. That’s relatively new, and that was a big change in this cohort. “We believe that’s the primary reason that there was this surge of applicants at the top. We were assertive in not only responding to [students] but at times, initiating contact.” Bishop said the efforts of Notre Dame’s faculty and staff, particularly in the admissions and financial aid offices, were the biggest factor in the increase. “We just continued to do a better job of engaging our students,” he said. “We’ve seen some real increases in yield rates over groups that came to campus for special visit programs, and those all rose up this year in a specific way.” As the applicant pool increases, the yield of admitted students who actually go on to enroll ordinarily tends to drop, Mundy said, though this was not the case here. “As your applicant pool becomes stronger and we admit students, these students have options similar to Notre Dame in terms of academic quality, so now we have a large percentage of students who have some of these other great choices,” Mundy said. Bishop said he had anticipated the yield rate to go down for this high school graduating class because of the competition for the students among the country’s top colleges. “We normally like to take around 15 to 100 students off the wait list, so we always build our admit policies on the goal to also have some spots left over to reward some students on the wait list,” Bishop said. “What happened this spring was that our goal was to enroll 2,005 freshmen, and right now we have 2,074 freshmen who are still on the books. “We weren’t able to take any students off the waiting list, and we’re over-enrolled by about 60 freshmen,” he said. Bishop said approximately 53 percent of Notre Dame’s offers of admission were accepted. This statistic could put the University among the top 10 schools nationwide in terms of success in enrolling admitted students. Certain factors stand out among the class demographics, Bishop said. A record 136 African-American freshmen enrolled, compared to last year’s 111. Nine percent of the class is first-generation college students, compared to 7 percent in the past. Across the United States, 41.8 percent of the class hails from the Midwest, with 22.3 percent from the East Coast, 19.9 percent from the West and Southwest, and 10.2 percent from the south. Of the 2,074 students, 121 came from outside the United States. “I think it’s important for the University to be equally attractive to all the talent groups in the country,” Bishop said. “[This data] shows that Notre Dame is a place that everyone is aspiring to enroll, and when they visit they see themselves here.” In selecting this record-breaking class, Bishop said the Office of Admissions looked beyond how good these students seemed on paper to find people who “will never be satisfied with their current level of success, who will want to grow.” “As intelligent as our students are, we really believe that they have already shown the capacity to develop a higher level of wisdom, to use their talents in ways that matter to others, and through that, they’ll be happier,” he said. “The point is that there is a difference between intelligence and wisdom, which was one of our short answer questions on the application last year. We were trying to send a message to the applicant pool that at Notre Dame, wisdom is probably a greater accomplishment than just their intelligence, and that you have to use your intelligence well.” Contact Ann Marie Jakubowski at [email protected]last_img read more

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Award-winning solar program available until July 1

first_imgEnergy Co-op of Vermont,The Energy Co-op of Vermont’s Co-op Solar hot water heating program has received the Vermont Governor’s Award for Environmental Excellence for its contributions to protecting the environment, conserving energy, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The Vermont Governor’s Awards (SEE STORY) were established in 1993 to ‘recognize the actions taken by Vermonters to conserve and protect natural resources, prevent pollution, and promote environmental sustainability.’ In 2012, the innovative solar program led to the installation of over 40 solar hot water systems in Chittenden County, keeping an estimated 70,000 lbs of carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and saving Vermonters approximately $500,000 over the lifetime of the systems.Energy Co-op General Manager John Quinney and Program Coordinator Ben Griffin accepted the award on behalf of the Vermont residents, business owners and partners who participated in the 2012 program. Deb Markowitz, Secretary of the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources, presented the award at UVM’s Davis Center on Tuesday evening, May 14th saying ‘The Co-op Solar program was designed to make solar simple and affordable by forming strategic partnerships, negotiating volume discounts, and providing cost-effective financing to reduce the overall cost. Others are now using this model to promote solar installations around the state.’The Energy Co-op of Vermont also announced that the deadline for the 2013 Co-op Solar program has been extended until July 1st, due to the high level of interest in the program and the continued availability of state incentive funds. Since its launch in February, over 500 Vermonters have signed up for a free solar site assessment available through the program to see how much they can save by going solar. Senator Bernie Sanders shared high praise for the program at the 2013 kick-off event saying, ‘What is particularly exciting about this program is that people can move in this direction without spending any more money on their fuel bills than they currently are, because they’re going to pay off their loan from the credit union by reduced fuel costs. That is exactly the right direction to go.’The state of Vermont offers a $900 – $1200 incentive towards the installation of the Co-op Solar systems through its Clean Energy Development Fund (CEDF). A federal tax credit of 30% brings the net cost down even further. Coupled with the discount through the Co-op, the cost of a typical system has been reduced by almost 50%. Financing is also available through local banks and credit unions, helping the solar systems to be installed with little to no upfront costs. ‘We are really excited about this program because we think that this is the kind of innovative marketing and innovative financing that solar hot water needs.’said Andrew Perchlik, Executive Director of CEDF.In addition to extending the program’s deadline, the service area has been expanded for 2013 and is open to any home or business owner in Northwestern and Central Vermont. A Co-op Solar open house will be held Saturday, May 18th in Shelburne from 10am to 2pm at Sunward Systems (6221 Shelburne Road, Suite 210), the Vermont-based manufacturer of the solar hot water systems. Attendees can learn more about how the solar systems work and sign up for the program. Other educational events are planned and will be taking place in the Co-op Solar communities. Interested participants can get more details and also sign up for a site assessment online at www.Co-opSolar.net(link is external). The Energy Co-op of Vermont is a member-owned cooperative, delivering fuel oil, kerosene and wood pellets, and offering the installation and servicing of efficient heating equipment to a membership of 2,100 Vermonters. For more information about the Co-op or its Co-op Solar program, or to schedule an interview, please contact Ben Griffin by phone at (802) 395-1388 or by email at [email protected](link sends e-mail).last_img read more

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Senior leaving mark on program

first_imgSenior leaving mark on programTwo-year captain Mikey Kantar is well respected by his peers, as well as his new coach. Tyler RushmeyerApril 5, 2007Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintSenior Mikey Kantar took up tennis in South Minneapolis at a young age. Over a decade later, his tenure of competitive play is coming to a close in the very same city.In the midst of his final semester of eligibility for the Minnesota men’s tennis team, Kantar said his route to a starting singles spot with the Gophers has been a unique one.“Tennis is not the normal sport you pick up in the city,” he said. “Most guys on my high school team grew up playing in public parks through the Urban Tennis Program.”The high school team Kantar refers to, Minneapolis South, made history during his junior season when it took home the Minnesota State AA Championship, the first city team to accomplish such a feat in 43 years.Three members of that team, including Kantar and seniors D.J. Geatz and Sion Wilkins, all find themselves starting for the Gophers six years later.Kantar said the championship run was easily one of the highlights of his playing career.“It was unbelievable,” he said. “We had a really unique group of guys that came together and did something that seemed impossible to many.”Along with three Minneapolis South alums, the Gophers’ starting lineup as of last weekend included three other natives before senior Brian Lipinski went down with an ankle injury.Senior Andres Osorio said the senior leadership headed by two-year team captain Kantar is vital to the Gophers’ success not only in this season, but for the future. “We as seniors try to improve and lead the entire squad to ensure that there is no drop off next year,” he said. “And Mikey is at the forefront of that.”His leadership will likely be needed as the team’s goal of a run to the NCAA tournament has been briefly sidetracked in the past two weeks with the Gophers falling nearly 15 spots in the national rankings in that span.Kantar said his confidence in the team has not been shaken and the goals have not changed, despite the rough stretch.He added that his individual aspirations give way to the good of the team, especially battling in what will be at most his final two months of collegiate tennis.“I’m not going to be a pro tennis player. The important thing is what this team does,” he said. “Our goal is the round of 16 in the NCAA tournament and maybe further. Nothing has changed.”Coach Geoff Young, in his first season coaching Minnesota, said it didn’t take long to figure out who the leader of his team was after his arrival, and that Kantar’s efforts will be needed if the team’s lofty goals are to be recognized.“He’s the heart and soul of this team, and he expects so much of himself,” he said. “Before he leaves here, I want him to believe in himself as much as he believes in this team.”Kantar, who has already graduated with a Bachelor of Science in applied plant science, said it’s important to teach as much as he can to his teammates before his time at the University ends in May.“I want to leave a mark on this program in any way possible,” he said. “Hopefully that will be through my contributions to a tough team in the NCAAs on my way out.”last_img read more

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Apia office fund and Scottish Widows carry out assets for units deal

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