Real estate execs to city, state: Let us help with recovery efforts

first_imgFull Name* Share via Shortlink The signatories include a who’s who of New York real estate executives: Among the dozens of industry bigwigs included are Vornado Realty Trust’s Steven Roth, HFZ Capital Group’s Ziel Feldman, Related Companies CEO Jeff Blau, Douglas Durst, Blackstone Group’s Steven Schwarzman and Tishman Speyer’s Rob Speyer.This is the second letter that the Partnership has sent to de Blasio, calling for the city’s revival. The first asked for actions to be taken regarding public safety and other quality of life issues facing the city.The pandemic has had significant impacts on the city’s economy. In less than five months, the New York metropolitan region lost 1 million jobs and up to a third of the city’s small businesses are projected to permanently close. Additionally, the region’s affordable housing deficit is projected to increase by at least 150,000 units, according to a July report by the Partnership for New York City, which was cited in the new letter.Following the original letter, de Blasio called for office workers to return to the office and began a new cleanliness initiative focused on streets and parks.“It’s time to start moving, more and more,” de Blasio said at a press briefing Tuesday.Contact Sasha Jones Email Address* Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlinkcenter_img Message* TagsAndrew CuomoBill de Blasiopartnership for new york city Bill de Blasio and Andrew Cuomo, with (from left) Steven Roth, Jeff Blau, Rob Speyer, Douglas Durst, Ziel Feldman and Steven Schwarzman (Getty)Mayor Bill de Blasio and Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s mailboxes may be getting full.The Partnership for New York City sent another letter to the city and state’s top executives Friday, in which 177 business leaders offered to collaborate on a strategic plan for New York’s economic recovery.“As the first place in America to be struck hard by the coronavirus and the first to successfully manage its containment, New York should step up to chart the course for recovery of urban centers everywhere,” the letter reads.Read moreDe Blasio calls for return to the office, restores trash pickupsNYC real estate execs to de Blasio: Bring this city backFlip-flop on eviction ban extension highlights state’s chaotic responselast_img read more

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Egypt signs 3 GW solar deal with SkyPower, IGD

first_imgEgypt signs 3 GW solar deal with SkyPower, IGDThe project comes on the heels of the Egyptian government’s announcement to build a new capital city for $45 billion. The Canadian solar giant describes the $5 billion investment for 3,000 MW of utility-scale solar PV projects as a “landmark agreement.” March 18, 2015 pv magazine Installations Manufacturing Markets Markets & Policy Share Canadian solar giant SkyPower Global and International Gulf Development (IGD) have signed a major agreement with the government of Egypt to develop 3 GW of utility-scale solar PV projects to be built over the next four years. The companies reached the agreement at the first ever Egypt Economic Development Conference, where the Egyptian government also unveiled its ambitious plans to build a new capital city from scratch outside of Cairo for an estimated $45 billion. The deal is seen as a major step in Egypt’s plan to develop a sustainable renewable energy industry, creating thousands of new green energy jobs and attracting billions in capital investment. The 3 GW project is expected to create 75,000 jobs and includes the establishment of 600 MW of manufacturing and assembly fabs in the country. “The availability of energy and managing the demand for it is one of the main priorities on the Egyptian development agenda,” said Egyptian President Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi. SkyPower President and CEO Kerry Adler added, “The signing of this monumental agreement demonstrates the shared passionate aspirations of global partnerships that will substantially impact the country’s GDP, contributing approximately $16.1 billion, resulting in increased opportunities for employment, skills training, youth and education.” SkyPower is partnering with IGD, an infrastructure specialist and joint venture between Abu Dhabi-based conglomerates Al Hamed Enterprises and Gulf Data International (GDI) that focuses on the Middle Easter and North Africa. The venture will entail a multi-phase development. Working with the Egyptian Ministry of Electricity and Renewable Energy in the development of the solar PV energy projects, SkyPower and IGD expect phase one to reach commercial operation in late 2015. The Egyptian government is eager to develop clean, sustainable and cost-effective energy to support its growing energy demands and meet the country’s goal of producing 20% of energy from renewables by 2020. Egypt is looking to install 2.3 GW of solar (2 GW of large-scale and 300 MW of small scale under 500 kW) by 2017. The country will need plenty of new energy capacity in view of its lofty plans to build a new capital in the desert sands east of Cairo (which has served as the country’s capital for more than a 1,000 years) for some $45 billion. Cairo, whose population of 18 million is set to double in the coming decades, has long suffered from power blackouts and increasingly dilapidated infrastructure. The new capital would cover 700 square kilometers (an area roughly the size of Singapore or Denver) and house up to 7 million people. Troy Lulashnyk, Canadian Ambassador to Egypt, who was present at the signing of the agreement, said the deal “marks a significant milestone” for international businesses, sending a “clear signal … that they can work in Egypt with confidence, and to Egyptians that their country is open for business.”Popular content The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. 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The re… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The solar plant could start produc… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. 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Specialised transformers supplied to solar PV project in South Africa

first_img AFD and Eskom commit to a competitive electricity sector Featured image: Stock Read moreSouth Africa approves new standards for embedded generation Distribution photovoltaic (DPV) solarenergy transformers and generator step-up (GSU) wind turbine transformers aretherefore specially designed. Transient overvoltage is also an issue to consider, he says. On the high voltage (HV) side, overvoltage transients may occur due to multi-stage capacitor banks switching, or from the circuit breaker operation. On the low voltage (LV) side, voltages are controlled with high-frequency inverters which create harmonics and pulsed voltages. Bertoldi notes that the InternationalElectrotechnical Commission (IEC), Institute of Electrical and ElectronicsEngineers (IEEE) and the International Council on Large Electric Systems(CIGRÉ) are working to update standards related to this equipment. A number ofinternational standards already apply. “Transformers for wind and solarenergy generation have installation and operation characteristics that stronglyaffect their design,” Bertoldi says. “The design must also continue to meet therequirements for quality and cost.” Sign up for the ESI Africa newsletter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Specialised transformers designed withrenewable energy in mind “This directly affects the load profile and the thermal stress in the transformer materials,” he says. “A wide range in transformer temperature must be accommodated – from minus 25 to plus 50 degrees Celsius.” Bertoldi says the increasing use of renewable energy creates new demands and challenges for transformer design. This heralds Zest WEG’s entry into thelocal production of transformers for the renewable energy sector, according to salesteam leader Stuart Brown. He stresses that conventional ‘off the shelf’distribution transformers are not adequate for these applications. Finance and Policy “This exciting step into the renewables sector was achieved through our technical collaboration with WEG’s extensive research and development resources in Brazil,” Brown says. “We see great potential in the future of renewable energy solutions in Africa, especially as generation technologies evolve for the harnessing of solar and wind energy.” Among the specific factors affecting transformersin distribution photovoltaic (DPV) power generation systems is solarirradiation. The units were also subject to routineand type testing, including heat run, impulse and partial discharge tests. Theywere delivered to the project in batches between July and November 2019. UNDP China, CCIEE launch report to facilitate low-carbon development “These include IEC 60076-16 standards for wind turbines, for transformers from 100 kVA to 10,000 kVA, as well as dry-type and liquid-immersed transformers up to 72,5 kV,” he says. “The IEEE standard P57.159/D6 guides the design of transformers in DPV systems.” In addition to the local design andmanufacture of transformers for renewable energy projects, Zest WEG can providea range of integrated solutions for these projects. These include sub-station,e-houses, switchgear and inverters. Low carbon, solar future could increase jobs in the future – SAPVIA Active part assembly of the WEG PV transformer. Free to attend Knowledge Hubs at the African Utility Week and POWERGEN Africa conference will address technical solutions. Click here to register to attend or for more information about the event. Zest WEG’s local transformer manufacturing facility has supplied 36 specialised photovoltaic (PV) transformers to a solar energy generation plant in the Northern Cape, South Africa. Two WEG PV transformers leaving the manufacturing facility to be delivered to site. The CIGRÉ standard WG A2.50 alsoapplies to distributed energy sources and induced reverse power flow ontransmission and distribution transformers. TAGSinverterslow voltagesolar powerTransformerswind energy Previous articleDjibouti secures first renewables project: 60MW wind farmNext articleGE highlights the need of mentorship for women in STEM careers Nicolette Pombo-van ZylAs the Editor of ESI Africa, my passion is on sustainability and placing African countries on the international stage. I take a keen interest in the trends shaping the power & water utility market along with the projects and local innovations making headline news. Watch my short weekly video on our YouTube channel ESIAfricaTV and speak with me on what has your attention. Generation “An electrostatic ground shield isrequired between the primary and secondary windings to eliminate capacitivecoupling and transient overvoltage transfers,” he says. “This also filtersharmonics of high frequencies and pulsed LV voltages.” BRICS To ensure the highest standards, thedesign had been reviewed by an international independent consultant, saysRonaldo Bertoldi, engineering manager at the facility. The dual-system PV transformerswere manufactured to the customer’s specification of 3800/1900-1900 kVA and22/0.66-0.66 kV. last_img read more

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African American family mourns four loved ones as COVID-19 racial disparities exposed

first_imgSamara Heisz/iStock(NEW ORLEANS) — In the span of just 10 days, Kevin Franklin lost his 86-year-old mother and three big brothers to the coronavirus pandemic, and he says his loved ones didn’t know they had the disease until it was too late.“No one seemed sick. Nobody complained about nothing,” the 56-year-old Franklin told ABC News. “We didn’t know my mom had it until my mom went into the hospital.” Long-time residents of New Orleans, the Franklin family survived Hurricane Katrina, but the floodwaters that devastated the city in 2005 were a bit easier to battle because they could at least see them. Like Katrina, though, the coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, appears to be bringing a disproportionate amount of pain to African Americans like Kevin Franklin, who is mourning his mother, Antoinette, and his brothers Herman, 71, Timothy, 61, and Anthony, 58, all at the same time.“I’m just torn up right now,” Kevin Franklin said. His life has been one of anguish and anxiety since March 20 when Herman Franklin was the first of the four to die at Ochsner Baptist Medical Center.Preliminary data from coast to coast has suddenly cast a harsh spotlight on the pandemic’s lopsided toll on the African American community in Louisiana and across the nation.Blacks accounted for 70% of the 702 deaths in Louisiana linked to the coronavirus as of Thursday. Louisiana Health Department data shows that 66% of those who have perished from the pathogen suffered from hypertension, 43% had diabetes, 24% were dealing with obesity and 22% had cardiac disease. Blacks account for 32% of the population of the state and 13% of the country as a whole, according to Census data.“We have a particularly difficult problem of an exacerbation of a health disparity. We’ve known, literally forever, that diseases like diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and asthma are disproportionately afflicting the minority populations, particularly the African Americans,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and a member of President Donald Trump’s Coronavirus Task Force, said at White House briefing this week.“Unfortunately, when you look at the predisposing conditions that lead to a bad outcome with coronavirus — the things that get people into ICUs that require intubation and often lead to death — they are just those very comorbidities that are, unfortunately, disproportionately prevalent in the African American population,” Fauci added. “So we’re very concerned about that. It’s very sad. There’s nothing we can do about it right now, except to try and give them the best possible care to avoid those complications.”Grim numbersData in many locations across the nation appears to mirror what’s coming out of Louisiana (as of April 9):— Of the more than 6,600 confirmed cases of coronavirus in Chicago, 52% were black. Of the 196 deaths in Chicago linked to the disease, 67% were black, most with underlying chronic conditions, according to a daily tally provided Thursday afternoon by the city. Blacks make up 30% of the city’s population, per the Census.— In Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, 45% of the more than 1,500 people who had tested positive for the virus as of Thursday were black. Of the 68 people in the county to die from the disease, 45, or 66%, were black, according to numbers provided by officials there. Some 27% of the population is black in the county, the Census said.— In Michigan, blacks accounted for 40% of the more than 1,000 deaths, and 33% of confirmed COVID-19 cases, despite being 14% of the population. In Detroit, blacks, who represent 79% of the population, accounted for 76% of the 272 deaths in the city. But whites, who account for 15% of the population, represent 4% of the deaths and 3% of the cases. — While blacks comprise 22% of the population of North Carolina, they accounted for 39% of the more than 3,600 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 38% of the more than 60 deaths. Whites in the state accounted for 55% of confirmed cases and 63% of deaths, but make up 71% of the state’s population, according to the state Health Department.— In Maryland, blacks make up 31% of the population and 40% of the 138 deaths, according to the Maryland Department of Public Health.— In Ohio, blacks represent 13% of the population and 20% of the 5,500 confirmed cases and 13% of the 213 deaths, according to state data. Whites make up 81% of the population in Ohio, but 61% of the deaths.— And in Minnesota, blacks make up 9% of the population, but represent 8% of the more than 1,200 COVID cases and 2% of the 50 deaths, according to state data. Whites make up 84% of the population and 88% of the deaths.Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer told ABC News that while the virus is hitting people of all races in Michigan, it “is uniquely harmful to people that have had historical inequities.”She stressed that the only way to learn from the pandemic and prepare for the next is to drill down into the data and pinpoint ways to make sure the health care system doesn’t neglect minority communities. She urged other states to collect and release detailed information in order to ”level the barriers to health care and job opportunities, raising a family and education.”The data provided by other states is less clear when it comes to racial demographics. In some states, like Virginia and Massachusetts, there are large percentages where races are either unknown or not reported, making it tough to get a clear picture.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a portion of preliminary nationwide data on Wednesday amid increased political pressure to do so.While the CDC report was based on a scant sampling in March of 1,482 patients in 14 states and included race and ethnicity information on about 580 hospitalized cases, it showed that blacks, who represent 13% of the U.S. population, made up 33% of hospitalized coronavirus cases “suggesting that black populations might be disproportionately affected by COVID-19.”The CDC report does not mention deaths.There were more than 466,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in the United States, as of Thursday evening, and the virus had killed more than 16,600 people in the nation, so the sampling in the CDC report is just a fraction of the known cases in the U.S.Vice President Mike Pence said a group of African American leaders have been invited to the White House to discuss concerns raised by the early data.‘Lack of information will exacerbate existing health disparities’In a letter sent on March 30 to Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Rep. Ayanna Pressley, both Massachusetts Democrats, ask for comprehensive demographic data on people who are tested or treated for COVID-19.”Any attempt to contain COVID-19 in the United States will have to address its potential spread in low-income communities of color, first and foremost to protect the lives of people in those communities, but also to slow the spread of the virus in the country as a whole,” the lawmakers wrote to Azar. ”This lack of information will exacerbate existing health disparities and result in the loss of lives in vulnerable communities.”The Poor People’s Campaign, a nonprofit grassroots organization that is a revival of the one started by Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and led to the 1968 Poor People’s March on Washington, issued a statement Wednesday calling on hospitals and health departments across the country to begin reporting coronavirus cases by race and ethnicity, poverty and income.”Failure to do so masks underlying inequalities and hampers efforts to ensure prevention is equitable,” the organization’s COVID-19 Health Justice Advisory Committee, which is made up of experts from Harvard University, UCLA and other schools, said in a statement. “To mitigate the spread of the virus, everyone must have access to free and respectful medical testing, a safe place to recover, and high-quality medical treatment. Poor people and people of color must not be denied equal access to care.”‘It’s sick, it’s troubling, it’s wrong’New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio on Wednesday warned that a day of reckoning is at hand for the disparities wrought by an American health care system that he says generally bases its level of care on the content of an individual’s pocketbook.”It’s just abundantly clear that it’s sick, it’s troubling, it’s wrong,” de Blasio said. “Our nation has still not come to grips with the fact that health care is provided so unevenly and all based on how much money you have.”In New York City, the current epicenter of the global contagion, longtime disparities in the health care system are being dramatically exposed in overwhelmed hospital wards and show another minority community, Hispanics, bearing the burnt of the daily bad news.Of the more than 5,100 people whose deaths in New York City have been attributed to coronavirus, blacks, who comprise 22% of the city’s population, accounted for 28% of the deaths, while whites, who make up 32% of the population, accounted for 27% of the deaths. In the state as a whole, whites make up 74% of the population, but 61% of the deaths and blacks, while comprising 9% of the population made up 17% of the more than 7,000 fatalities.Public health officials in the city also expressed concern about the Hispanic population. Some 34% of New York City’s deaths were Hispanic, despite making up just 29% of the city’s population, according to data released on Wednesday by the New York Department of Public Health.“I am very concerned when I see the large percentage of Latinos who have died from this illness even though we have made lots of efforts to reassure people that our public hospitals see individuals independent of their immigration status, independent of insurance status,” Dr. Oxiris Barbot, commissioner of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, said at a news conference on Wednesday.“The overlay of the anti-immigrant rhetoric across this country, I think, has real implications in the health of our community and certainly concerns about Public Charge are something we need to dig into,” she said, referring to federal laws denying immigrants visas or permission to enter the country due to disabilities or lack of economic resources.Dr. Patricia Tellez-Giron, associate professor at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and co-chair of the Latino Health Council of Dane County, Wisconsin, said education and language barriers also pose roadblocks to proper health care for the Spanish-speaking community.“We were very lucky to [have] very good interpreting services set up for our hospitals before this crisis. However, when this pandemic started we didn’t have enough resources that were language and culturally appropriate for our communities,” Tellez-Giron told ABC News.“This pandemic really hit hard in my community because we can’t take advantage of the social nets that other people can take, like unemployment,” she added. “We’re on the front lines cleaning the hospitals and the stores and in the stores, and yet many of the undocumented community that we have will not take advantage of that.”In Wisconsin, Hispanics made up 10% of the cases as of April 9 and 3% of the deaths. They make up 7% of the population.Tellez-Giron has recently participated in Spanish radio programs in Wisconsin and spent nearly three hours taking questions from listeners about the COVID-19.“We knew we needed to do these as soon as possible,” Tellez-Giron said. “We jumped on the radio and started talking about prevention and people had very good questions about prevention. However, most of the questions were about what am I going to do now when I lose my job? How am I going to pay the rent? How do I protect my family?”‘A call-to-action moment’Both Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot and New York Mayor de Blasio announced this week that they are working on launching programs to reach their devastated minority communities.”This is a call-to-action moment for all of us. When we talk about equity and inclusion, they are not just nice notions,” Lightfoot said at a news conference on Monday. ”They are an imperative that we must embrace as a city. And we see this even more urgently when we look at these numbers.”Lightfoot said the city would be deploying racial equity rapid response teams into the community to identify and help vulnerable people get medical services.De Blasio said he would like to see something similar in New York City.”We’re going to have to find a way to get health care professionals out into communities to educate people, to answer their questions, to help them address their immediate challenges, but in a way that is safe for those health care workers,” de Blasio said.In an appearance on ABC’s The View on Wednesday, Sen. Kamala Harris, D-California, said no one should be surprised that the virus is taken an uneven toll on the African American community — noting that 20% of black children suffer from asthma, that 40% of blacks have high blood pressure and that black women are three times more likely than white women to have lupus.“Those who had preexisting health conditions based on racial disparities, based on socioeconomic disparities are doing even worse in the midst of this pandemic,” Harris said. “So it requires us to address it in a way that also recognizes the historical nature of it.”She suggested that one way to confront the problem would be for the Federal Emergency Management Association to direct resources to those communities that the data shows disparities in health care are most evident.“For years, I have been working on black maternal mortality, which before this pandemic was very real,” Harris said. “We were talking about it, black women are three to four times more likely to die in connection with childbirth than white women. When we looked at the issue, it had nothing to do with that woman’s education level or her socioeconomic level. It literally had to do with the fact that when a black woman was walking into a hospital or a clinic or a doctor’s office, she was not being taken seriously.” Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Corethree reports record-breaking growth

first_imgCorethree, the mobile ticketing provider, has heralded 2018 as a “bumper” growth period as it passed the 80 million mark for m-tickets sold in Europe since its creation six years ago.Corethree announces 80m m-ticket salesThe company, whose transport sector client base includes First Group, Arriva, Transport for London and Transport for Greater Manchester (TfGM), says it sold three million tickets across Europe in October alone and the beginning of Q4 saw it process £6,250,000 worth of m-tickets in one week across Europe. Corethree’s m-ticketing apps are available for download via the itunes App Store, Android or Google Play.“We are delighted to be closing 2018 on such a high note,” says Ashley Murdoch, CEO of Watford-based Corethree“While the transport sector has been the main driver of m-ticket solution, we are actively engaged with partners in the entertainment industry where another huge consumer audience is waiting to benefit from the world of mobile tickets.”last_img read more

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Stark warning to applicant states over skills gap

first_imgThe draft paper, drawn up by Anna Diamantopoulou’s social affairs department, warns that the low level of education and vocational skills in central and eastern European countries is hampering their economic and social development – calling into question their ability to meet EU standards.“Insufficient or inappropriate investment in human resources development can mean that countries lack the skills needed to compete in newly opened foreign and domestic markets,” warns the report.Narrowing the growing gap between wage levels in the EU and the applicant countries is seen as vital to avoid a rocky first few years for an enlarged Union. Diamantopoulou’s paper will be seized on by those who are arguing for transition periods before workers from new member states are given the right to work anywhere in the Union as evidence that a delay is essential. Germany and Austria, in particular, are worried that if there is still a huge difference in pay levels when candidate countries join, large numbers of their citizens will commute across borders to work. Average rates of pay in the Czech Republic are, for example, currently around one-quarter of those in Austria.This has prompted both countries to call for a time lag of up to ten years before citizens from new member states are granted full free-movement rights, although this is being fiercely resisted by the applicants.The skills gap in the candidate countries is also prompting a rethink about the nature of any such transition periods. Diplomats say governments are considering a quota system which would allow a limited number of workers from new entrants into existing member states. These quotas could be fine-tuned on a regional basis, or to allow skilled workers in while keeping the unskilled out.However, the applicant countries are bound to resist any proposal which could contribute to their existing brain drain problem. EU diplomats also warn that introducing a quota system instead of a blanket ban on free movement would make it easier for those countries which favour transition periods to persuade others to keep the restrictions in place for longer.Diamantopoulou’s report points out that the employment rate in the central and eastern European applicant countries is actually falling, with an overall drop of 1.3% in 1999 despite a strong global economic situation. This compares poorly with existing EU member states, all of which are seeing an increase in employment numbers.The paper points to key structural problems in the candidate countries’ labour markets, particularly in relation to poor training and skills. “The biggest challenge appears to be the inherited educational and skill structure,” it states. “Contrary to common belief, skill and educational levels in these countries are lower than in the Union and have not much improved in the 1970s and 1980s up to the early 1990s.”The Commission’s report finds that more young people in these countries drop out of school without sufficient skills, and detects a growing divide between the ‘knowledge-rich’ and the ‘knowledge-poor’. It blames this in part on regressive tax regimes. “Basic individual exemptions in the personal income tax code are relatively small and social contributions tend to be high and strictly proportional,” it states.Sweden to push for breakthrough in key enlargement talkslast_img read more

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Coachella To Be Broadcast on YouTube, AXS TV

first_imgNo tickets to Coachella?  No problem.For the first time ever, both weekends of the Indio, California music and arts festival will be available via the web and TV.According to festival organizers, the first weekend will be broadcast on YouTube, and the second will be air on AXS TV.Hosting both weekends will be Jason Bentley, Music Director of the Los Angeles radio station KCRW.  Coverage will include artist interviews, full sets, a peek behind the scenes and select performances.  This year’s Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival will run from April 11th to April 13th and from April 18th to 20th.  Featured performers include Arcade Fire, OutKast, Muse, Beck and many others.  Check out our previous coverage of the upcoming festival here.-Sarah Compo (@sarahcompo)last_img read more

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Eric Krasno Welcomes Derek Trucks, Cory Wong, & More At Blue Note NYC [Photos/Video]

first_imgIt’s been a big week for guitarist Eric Krasno. In addition to playing his first gig as the interim guitarist with Circles Around The Sun and releasing his stellar new concept album, TELESCOPE, Krasno brought his eponymous trio to the hallowed Blue Note NYC for a four-night run.Krasno has collaborated with virtually everyone on the live music circuit over the years, and with Vulfpeck at Madison Square Garden and Tedeschi Trucks Band at the Beacon Theatre this weekend—in addition to the various other artists that live in or frequent the Big Apple—the pool of potential surprise guests for this final night at the Blue Note was as deep as ever.On Sunday night, the Eric Krasno Trio (E3) closed out their intimate Blue Note residency with help from a number of high-profile guests. The show got started with the core trio—comprised of Krasno, drummer Eric Kalb, and organist Eric Finland—performing takes on a trio of Krasno originals in “76”, “Torture”, and “Jezebel”.The first guest of the evening, Leslie Mendelson, joined in next for renditions of soul classic, “That’s What Love Will Make You Do”, and “Please Ya”, another cut from Krasno’s 2016 LP, Blood From A Stone. Next, Krasno welcomed Tedeschi Trucks Band trumpeter Ephraim Owens and revered jazz guitarist Mark Whitfield to augment a performance of Jimmy McGriff deep cut, “All About My Girl”.From there, the Krasno trio was joined by Vulfpeck/The Fearless Flyers guitarist Cory Wong, fresh off his MSG debut the night prior, who added some funky rhythm lines on “Jan Jan” as his Fearless Flyers bandmate/Snarky Puppy guitarist, Mark Lettieri, looked on from the audience. With time for a couple more, Krasno called Derek Trucks to the stage.As Susan Tedeschi and several other members of TTB watched from the crowd, Eric Krasno, Derek Trucks, and company worked through “Curse Lifter”, another track from Krasno’s Blood From A Stone which features Trucks on the studio recording. As Krasno notes, this marked the first time he and Trucks had ever performed the song together live. Watch a video of the “Curse Lifter” collab below:Eric Krasno Trio w/ Derek Trucks – “Curse Lifter” – Blue Note NYC – 9/29/19Finally, with Trucks still on stage, the four-piece lineup closed out the show with a fiery, Soulive-style take on Jimi Hendrix favorite, “Manic Depression”.Below, you can check out a gallery of photos from the guest-filled Eric Krasno Trio performance courtesy of photographer Chris Capaci.This weekend, the Eric Krasno Trio will head to Texas for shows at Deep Ellum Art Company in Dallas (Friday, October 4th) and Empire Garage in Austin (Saturday, October 5th). For more details and ticketing information, head here.Setlist: Eric Krasno Trio | Blue Note | New York, NY | 9/29/19Set: 76, Torture, Jezebel, Big Brother, That’s What Love Will Make You Do*, Please Ya*, All About My Girl^, Jan Jan%, Curse [email protected], Manic [email protected]* with Leslie Mendelson^ with Mark Whitfield and Ephraim Owens% with Cory [email protected] with Derek Trucks Eric Krasno Trio w/ Derek Trucks, Cory Wong, More | Blue Note NYC | New York, NY | 9/29/19 | Photos: Chris Capaci Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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Theologian studies evolution

first_img “The project itself is very exciting because there are questions also that scientists would not think of asking without the dialogue with the humanities,” she said. “I’m not suggesting that theology necessarily informs the message of science, but theology will certainly push science to ask questions in a different kind of way than they might otherwise have done.” “This particular [study] is looking at human nature in the light of other animals but also our own evolutionary origins,” she said. “I’ve moved from Christology to human nature, and the questions I began to ask at the end of my Christology book were about human nature. So this book follows on from that directly.” The study, which strives to facilitate interdisciplinary dialogue, is sponsored by Center for Theological Inquiry (CTI) in Princeton, N.J., and will take place during the 2012-2013 academic year. Deane-Drummond, along with co-leader Dominic Johnson of the University of Edinburgh, is reviewing research applications for eight research fellows and two post-doctoral fellows to participate in the study.   Theology professor Celia Deane-Drummond has spent 20 years of her career bridging the gap between science and theology. “We’re going to [be] working out important questions, theological questions, about what it means to be human, but in the light of not just the internal, theological context but in the light of the understanding of science,” she said. “I’m working on forms of theological thinking that make sense in a scientifically engaged culture,” she said. Deane-Drummond said the research team will address large theological questions from multiple angles. Deane-Drummond will continue that mission this fall, leading a team of scientists, theologians, anthropologists, psychologists and others in a study called, “Inquiry on Evolution and Human Nature.” Deane-Drummond said the study will facilitate a cooperation between the two disciplines. She said that in today’s world, it is important to reconcile science and theology. “We will probably produce a book on evolution, human nature and religion, or something like that, which will show the fruits of our mutual conversation as well as our individual projects,” she said. Deane-Drummond said she herself has a multi-disciplinary background, as she holds a doctorate in theology and another in plant physiology. “In my previous major monograph on systematic theology, I looked at Christology and how we could envisage a Christology that made sense in the light of evolutionary theory,” Deane-Drummond said. “The point of this is to bring together …  a multidisciplinary team to contribute to sharing what they are researching in their own areas around this topic so that we feel … we are far better informed when we come to consider the crucial questions,” she said. “The first part of the process is getting the team together for the year,” she said. “There’s an application process, and it is in itself highly competitive.” Each researcher will pursue his or her own individual monograph project, Deane-Drummond said. She said she would also like all the researchers to eventually produce a collaborative project. She said the study will pick up her research right where she left off.last_img read more

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