New boutique office building headed for East Village’s St. Mark’s

first_imgA rendering of 1 St. Marks PlaceAnother high-priced, boutique office building is moving forward in Midtown South.Real Estate Equities Corp.’s development at 1 St. Mark’s Place in the East Village landed a nearly $80 million construction loan, according to property records filed with the city Wednesday.South Korean financial services firm Hana Financial Group provided the $79.1 million loan, then sold the $48 million first mortgage to Madison Realty Capital  and held onto a $31.1 million mezzanine loan. VI Development Group arranged the debt.A representative for REEC — headed by Brandon Miller and Mark Siegel — declined to comment.REEC is planning to develop a 10-story, 65,000-square-foot office building on the site at the corner of St. Mark’s Place and Third Avenue.ADVERTISEMENTThe developers will be eyeing rents in the area of $150 per square foot. Such figures were once only seen in the most expensive locations in Midtown but now are commonplace for newly constructed office buildings in areas like the Meatpacking District, Soho and Greenwich Village.The site at 1 St. Mark’s sits across the street from Minskoff Equities’ 51 Astor Place, the glass and steel building that arguably set the standard for new office construction when it opened in 2013. At the time, it was derided by locals as being out of character with the East Village’s complexion.(That property was also financed by a South Korean investor, the Korean Teachers’ Credit Union, which in 2015 bought a 49-percent stake in the property valuing it at $600 million.)Elsewhere in the area, Normandy Real Estate Partners and Columbia Property Trust are developing a 180,000-square-foot office building a few blocks north at 799 Broadway.REEC controls the St. Mark’s property through a 99-year lease it signed in 2017 for north of $150 million. This content is for subscribers only.Subscribe Nowlast_img read more

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Brooklyn Comes Alive Schedule Has Been Released

first_imgThe schedule for Brooklyn Comes Alive is here! With over thirty artists performing in various superjam combinations throughout the day, this is sure to be a unique and memorable event.Brooklyn Comes Alive takes place this Saturday, September 26th from 12 PM-5 AM. Day passes are sold out, but you can purchase individual tickets to the Jazz Brunch and Orchard Lounge Late Night right here. If you already purchased a GA badge, admission to ALL of these events are included and you will be granted entry to any of the shows throughout the day. Some space may be limited so arrive at your favorites early, though attendees with wristbands are always guaranteed access to at least one of our events at any given time.Call (347) 223-4732 to make a reservation for the Jazz Brunch at Verboten. You may request the main room for Maurice “Mobetta” Brown followed by Billy Martin, or the Cabaret Room if you’d prefer to check out Holly Bowling. Reservations are not required.GA badges can be picked up at Verboten beginning at 11:30 AM. We can’t wait to see you at the inaugural Brooklyn Comes Alive!Brooklyn Comes Alive 2015 ScheduleVerboten:12:00 – 1:15 — Blue Note JAZZ BRUNCH ft. Maurice ‘Mobetta’ Brown & SOUL’D U OUT: Chelsea Baratz, Solomon Dorsey, Warren Fields, Shelton Garnder, Joe Blaxx, and Bendji Allonce1:15 – 2:00 — (Cabaret room) Blue Note JAZZ BRUNCH ft. Holly Bowling performing classical piano versions of Phish songs2:00 – 3:30 — BLUE NOTE JAZZ BRUNCH ft. Billy Martin (Medeski Martin & Wood), Kato Hideki, and Chris Cochrane3:30 – 4:00 — (Cabaret room) Hayley Jane (Hayley Jane & The Primates) Acoustic Set4:00 – 5:15 — SUPERJAM: Natalie Cressman (Trey Anastasio Band), Peter Apfelbaum (TAB), Ray Paczcowki (TAB), Tim Palmieri (Kung Fu), Adeline Michele, Russ Lawton (TAB), Nate Werth (Snarky Puppy)5:15 – 5:45 — (Cabaret room) Wiley Griffin (Teddy Midnight) Acoustic Set5:45 – 7:00 — SUPERJAM: Jennifer Hartswick (TAB), Scott Metzger (JRAD/Wolf!), Louis Cato (George Duke), Bob Lanzetti (Snarky Puppy), Anthony Wellington (Victor Wooten), Rob Marscher (Matisyahu), Natalie Cressman (TAB)7:00 – 7:30 — (Cabaret room) Sing-A-Long Party feat. Nina Zeitlin7:30 – 8:30 — Todd Stoops (RAQ) and Marvel Years with Special Guest Hayley Jane8:30 – 9:15 — Sing-A-Long Party feat. Nina Zeitlin9:15 – 10:45 — Live for Live Music Presents The Stratosphere All-Stars featuring Marc Brownstein (The Disco Biscuits), Mike Greenfield (Lotus/Electron), Todd Stoops (RAQ), and Marcus Rezak (Digital Tape Machine)10:45 – 11:30 — (Cabaret room) DJ Logic11:30 – 12:30 — Good Looks Collective Presents Brownie (Marc Brownstein DJ Set)12:30 – 5 — Good Looks Collective Presents Orchard Lounge (Extended Reunion Set)Music Hall of Williamsburg:7:00 – 8:15 — Andrew Block Superjam featuring Nigel Hall, Russell Batiste, and Eric Vogel8:45 – 10:15 — Live for Live Music Presents Eric Krasno (Lettuce/Soulive) Superjam featuring Marco Benevento and more TBA10:45 – 12:15 — Roosevelt Collier Superjam featuring Doug Wimbish (Living Colour) and Soule Monde12:45 – ? — Relix Presents Marco Benevento and Friends Superjamlast_img read more

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Not lifting: Chastain doesn’t plan to stop racing in all three series

first_imgThe more laps, the better.Or at least that’s Ross Chastain’s mindset. He ran 77 races last season across NASCAR’s top three series. Without drop-off, too. Chastain finished second in the final standings of the Gander Outdoors Truck Series, where he competed full time for points.“It’s weird,” Chastain said at the NASCAR Awards in Charlotte, North Carolina. “It’s just the adrenaline of thinking you’re going to go and compete in every national NASCAR race that weekend. Plus, I think it helps my driving. I’m not naturally Kyle Busch (the Cup Series’ 2019 champion). I’m not, and I accepted that probably before I ever raced at 12 years old.”RELATED: Silly Season updates | Gander Truck Series rankingsChastain made his NASCAR debut in 2011 and has since notched 311 starts overall. The 77 this past season topped the 74 mark in 2018 and broke down into all 23 events in the Gander Truck Series, 19 in the Xfinity Series and 35 in the Cup Series. He piloted the Nos. 38, 44 and 45 Niece Motorsports Chevrolets full time in the Gander Truck Series, moved among the Nos. 10 and 16 Kaulig Racing Chevrolets and the No. 4 JD Motorsports Chevrolet in the Xfinity Series and then bounced between the Nos. 15 and 27 Premium Motorsports Chevrolets in the Cup Series.Through it all, Chastain has two wins in the Xfinity Series — the first was at Las Vegas Motor Speedway in 2018 and then Daytona International Speedway in 2019 — and three in the Gander Truck Series — all in 2019 at Kansas Speedway, World Wide Technology Raceway at Gateway and Pocono Raceway. He has one top 10 in the Cup Series.“If I’m going to make it in this sport, I’m putting in the work now to hopefully make that next step in a couple of years,” Chastain said.The first step was made back in October when Chastain and Kaulig Racing announced the 27-year-old will race for the Xfinity Series championship full time in 2020 with the No. 10 entry. As of the banquet in November, a crew chief had not been officially decided on.Chastain still plans to run in the Gander Truck and Cup Series next season, in as many events as he possibly can and is allowed.“We’re having those conversations right now,” Chastain said. “But I tell every team when I first meet them, get to know them and before I ever drive for them, OK, you’re going to have some hard days to deal with me. Here’s what I think it will be, and then you tell me ahead of time what you think it’ll be. And then we’ll go through that. Because I don’t want any surprises. … Different teams want me to run less and some teams want me to run more. It depends on their personal opinion.”The argument is whether Chastain should focus solely on one circuit. He doesn’t think so and needs teams that understand even if they don’t fully agree. His goal is to improve, and he believes this is the way.Because, ideally, he’d eventually like to earn a competitive full-time ride in the Cup Series.“Whatever happens, happens,” Chastain said. “I’ve probably already out-kicked my coverage on my career.”last_img read more

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NY Driver Fleeing Fender Bender with Ambulance Crashes into Pole

first_imgCharges were pending against the driver. Nobody was hurt in the mayhem. Wes Parnell Another neighbor said the driver was fortunate the wreck happened on a slow Sunday. Despite it being just a fender bender, the driver lost his cool and fled the scene, slamming into a light pole at Hart St. and Irving Ave. in Bushwick around 9:30 a.m., police said. A driver fled the scene of a fender bender with an ambulance in Brooklyn Sunday only to crash into a light pole a mile away, police said. New York Daily News The 34-year-old driver got into an argument with another driver and it distracted him long enough to mindlessly roll into an ambulance stopped at Boerum St. and White St. in Williamsburg around 9 a.m., police said. File Photo “Lucky today there’s no school. It’s a major street,” said Connie Li, 70, who heard a boom when the driver took out the light pole. “Some drivers don’t know how to drive.” (TNS) Visit New York Daily News at www.nydailynews.com ––– ©2020 New York Daily News “I don’t know if he was drunk or what,” said Rodrigo Alvarado, 53, who lives near the scene of the Bushwick crash. “It’s lucky nobody died.” Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.last_img read more

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Millionaire Gives Mansions to Homeless

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreJapanese billionaire, Genshiro Kawamoto, cried as he presented the keys to a multimillion-dollar home to a low-income single mom with 5 kids. “Her family will live there rent-free, but must pay utility bills. He plans to open eight of his 22 Hawaiian homes to poor families for ten years.” (By AUDREY McAVOY, Associated Press – with photo) UPDATE: An alert GNN reader pointed to this same billionaire’s eviction of 420 California families five years ago on 30 days notice… perhaps he is repenting for his sins. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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Mascoma Savings Bank’s CEO announces 2017 retirement plans

first_imgMascoma Savings Bank, FSB,Vermont Business Magazine Stephen F Christy, President and CEO of Mascoma Savings Bank, has announced his plans to retire on January 1, 2017 after almost 27 years at the helm of the local institution he first joined as a teller in 1973. Headquartered in Lebanon, New Hampshire, Mascoma Savings Bank is a $1.4 billion mutually owned bank established in 1899 with 27 branch locations in western New Hampshire and eastern Vermont, and two loan production offices in Vermont. Christy has held the top post at Mascoma Savings Bank since February of 1990. He also serves on the executive committee and the board of directors, which will embark on a search for his successor with the assistance of Kaplan Partners of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.“In making my plans for retirement, I’m comfortable in knowing that the commitment Mascoma Savings Bank has made to its customers and to the communities it serves will not change,” Christy said. “These values are ingrained not only in our culture, but also in our basic foundation as a mutual bank. We’re here for our customers. It’s as simple as that, and I have every confidence that it will always remain that way.”“Mascoma Savings Bank has experienced unprecedented growth and prosperity under Steve Christy’s leadership,” said Gretchen E. Cherington, Chair of the Board of Directors. “His dedication to our customers, his involvement in our communities, his genuine compassion for our employees, and his work on behalf of our industry are truly exemplary.“The board and I are extremely proud of Steve’s accomplishments and his years of service to the Bank,” she added. “His name has become synonymous with Mascoma Savings Bank; it will be a challenge to replace him, but we are confident that his legacy will continue.”Christy’s unwavering commitment to the community banking industry was recognized in 2014 with his selection as the Community Banker of the Year by the New Hampshire Bankers Association. The prestigious award honors individuals who go beyond the course of ordinary business to help improve the state through their civic and community engagement.Born and raised in the South, Christy is a graduate of Northwestern State University in Louisiana, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in history. During his high school and college summers, he worked in New Hampshire on the Mt. Washington Cog Railway. Following his graduation from Northwestern State University, he moved permanently to the Granite State, joining Mascoma Savings Bank more than four decades ago.Christy has held membership and leadership positions with numerous organizations in the community over the years. He is a past trustee of Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital, the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Clinic, and Alice Peck Day Memorial Hospital. He also chaired the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Alliance.  He is a past president and secretary of the Rotary Club of Lebanon. He is a past president of the Lebanon Public Library Foundation. He has also served as a director and chairman of Vital Communities in White River Junction, VT. In addition, he was a trustee and treasurer of the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, VT; a director of the New Hampshire Aviation Historical Society; and is a former member of the Airport Advisory Committee for the City of Lebanon, NH.  Professionally he is a past director of the Vermont Bankers Association and a past director and chairman of the New Hampshire Bankers Association. He is also a former director of the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston, where he chaired the audit committee.  He is a former director of the American Bankers Association in Washington, D.C.;Currently Christy is a director of the Daniel Webster Council of Boy Scouts of America in Manchester, NH; the New Hampshire Humanities Council, and the American Precision Museum in Windsor, VT. A private pilot, he makes his home in Lebanon, NH and plans to remain in the area, and active in the community, following his retirement.LEBANON, NEW HAMPSHIRE, (January 7, 2016)last_img read more

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Food on Friday: Tomat-No!

first_imgLooks promising, doesn’t it? It will be devoured by a squirrel in the next day, guaranteed.By Julia WesthoffWhat’s growing in your garden? I can tell you what is not growing in ours: tomatoes. Our squirrel neighbors are getting every single one of them, despite our best efforts. We’ve protected the plants with netting and had our dog prowl the grounds and still, every time I look out the window I see a little rodent running off with another heirloom tomato. We have six plants, and Jay doubts we will have any kind of harvest. It is crushing my soul.So, friends, any tips? In the meantime, here are some favorite tomato recipes from years past. These are all staples in our house, and I know they will be in yours, too. Now excuse me while I go weep quietly.Checca SauceCheesy Tomato SoupPico de GalloSalsaTomato CandyTomato Mozzarella Bread Saladlast_img read more

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RPPTL fellowships aim to attract young lawyers

first_imgRPPTL fellowships aim to attract young lawyers The Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section is now accepting applications to its fellowship program aimed at recruiting young practitioners to the Bar’s largest and oldest section.The fellowship program — created in 2007 and modeled after the successful fellowship program of the ABA — allows individuals to be substantially involved in the section’s work, receive leadership training, and work closely with leading attorneys in their field.In its inaugural year, the program received more than 80 applicants for four positions.The fellowship program is open to all lawyers who are members of the RPPTL Section and have been admitted to the Bar for fewer than 12 years or are younger than 38 years of age. Applicants should be able to demonstrate that a substantial portion of their practice is focused in the area of real property, probate, or trust law.Fellowships are provided for a two-year term. The RPPTL Section has more than 50 active committees and an Executive Council with more than 225 active members. The Executive Council and the section committees meet on a quarterly basis, beginning in June each year, at locations throughout the state. The quarterly meetings usually run from Thursday through Saturday and include substantive work and social events for networking.Each fellow will receive a subsidy of up to $2,500 annually (not to exceed actual out-of-pocket expenses) to help defray the expense of attending RPPTL Section meetings. Each fellow will also be assigned a social mentor who is a member of the Executive Council to assist the fellow in maximizing his or her experience.In addition, each fellow will be assigned a committee mentor to assist the fellow’s active involvement in the committee that most closely fits the fellow’s practice area with the goal of maximizing his or her professional development through the program.In return for the RPPTL Section commitments, a fellow is required to attend a minimum of three Executive Council meetings per year, serve as an active member of either the Membership Development Committee or the Membership Diversity Committee, and be an active member of at least one substantive committee. As an active committee member, the fellow will be required to complete one substantive work project on behalf of the committee on an annual basis. This project may include writing an article in his or her area of expertise for the section’s publication, Action Line, chairing a subcommittee, or drafting proposed legislation on behalf of the committee. To assure these requirements are fulfilled, each fellow must submit a work plan to the Fellowship Committee by October of each year, which outlines the substantive work project they have chosen, and a report at the end of each year.The fellows’ application is available through the RPPTL Section Web site at www.rpptl.org. All applications should be submitted to [email protected] or by mail to RPPTL Fellowship Program, Attn: Elizabeth Smith, The Florida Bar, 651 E. Jefferson Street, Tallahassee 32399-2300.The deadline to apply is April 1.The co-chair of the committee is Tae Bronner. She is available for additional information and m ay be reached at [email protected] or (813) 907-6643. RPPTL fellowships aim to attract young lawyers January 15, 2010 Regular News Winners will be provided leadership training and mentorslast_img read more

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Three national champs and a top-10 finish for women in Texas

first_imgShe would go on to be honored as the College Swimming Coaches Association of America (CSCAA) Diver of the Championships for her performances.Junior Kaylee Jamison bettered her school record in the 100-yard butterfly with a time of 52.69 and was an All-America honorable mention, as were the 200-yard medley, and 800-yard freestyle relays.Through two days, Minnesota had two national champions. Why would it slow down Saturday?Sophomore Spencer won the title in the 200-yard breaststroke with a time 2:06.12.âÄúI didnâÄôt know IâÄôd won,âÄù Spencer said. âÄúIn that last 10 yards, I did what I always do. I stuck my head down to go for it.âÄùSpencer was in fourth place entering the final 25 yards, but rallied with a 32.30 second split to win by a mere six one-hundredths of a second.âÄúHaley always has a great back half of the race,âÄù co-head coach Kelly Kremer said. âÄúThis isnâÄôt a surprise. Haley has worked really hard all year. What a great way to end the meet.âÄùTyler finished fourth after recording the fastest time in the prelims.Steenvoorden improved upon her school record in the 1650-yard freestyle with a 15:53.80 and a fourth place finish.âÄúThe Gophers brought a squad here that was prepared and ready to compete,âÄù co-head coach Terry Nieszner said. âÄúThis group made a statement about Minnesota swimming and diving.âÄù Three national champs and a top-10 finish for women in TexasKelci Bryant, Jillian Tyler and Haley Spencer led an experienced group of Gophers at the NCAA championships. Samuel GordonMarch 21, 2011Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintThe Minnesota womenâÄôs swimming and diving team traveled to Texas on Tuesday for the NCAA national championships, and returned with three national champions and 13 All-Americans.Kelci Bryant, Jillian Tyler and Haley Spencer led an experienced group of Gophers to a ninth-place finish. MinnesotaâÄôs 192 team points were a school record, while the University of California won the team championship, its second in the past three years.Bryant got things started on Thursday with a victory in the 1-meter dive. The junior was runner-up in last yearâÄôs event, but would not be denied this year. Bryant grabbed the lead following the first dive and never relinquished it, as she led after each of the six dives.âÄúI was thinking through my dive,âÄù Bryant said of her final dive. âÄúI was kind of zoning out. I wasnâÄôt stressing too much. I was having fun. I think I kind of had it in my head that I had [the win] in the bag already. I tried not to focus on what bad could happen.âÄùAshley Steenvoorden made a little history of her own that night. The All-American set a school record in the 500-yard freestyle prelims with a time of 4:36.48. She went on to swim a 4:37.11 in the finals, good enough for fourth place and All-America honors.Minnesota finished out ThursdayâÄôs portion of the championships with a sixth-place finish and All-America honors in the 400-yard medley relay.Tyler highlighted Friday for the Gophers. The senior clocked a 58.39 in the 100-yard breaststroke to claim her first national title.âÄúIâÄôm so thankful for the experience. This means the world to me,âÄù Tyler said. âÄúI just put my head down and swam to the finish. You just think about all the hard training weâÄôve done this year. I knew I couldnâÄôt lose it on the last 25. I raced hard to the wall.âÄùWith the victory, Tyler became just the second Gophers swimmer to win the NCAA title in the 100 breast and the first to achieve All-America status four consecutive years in the same event.On the heels of her championship on the 1-meter board, Bryant finished second in the 3-meter dive. The 2010 3-meter champ finished 13.50 points short of first place and back-to-back titles.last_img read more

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Study: Americans are more likely than Chinese to want to be ‘a big frog in a small pond’

first_imgPinterest LinkedIn Share Share on Twitter Share on Facebookcenter_img Email Culture matters it comes to being a the big frog in a small pond or the small frog in a big pond. New research has found that Americans would rather be remarkable in an average place, while Chinese would rather be average in a remarkable place.Psychologist Kaidi Wu of the University of Michigan, the study’s corresponding author, told PsyPost that she was interested in the topic for two main reasons.“It is hard to imagine going through life without having to make frog-pond decisions: which school to go to, which internship to choose, which company to work for,” she explained. “What we end up choosing has downstream consequences and may significantly alter the paths of our lives. It is no surprise that this topic has interested sociologists, economists, and educational psychologists for decades. However, although these studies tell you how you would feel after you’ve joined the “pond” of your choice, I have always wondered how people come to these decisions in the first place.” “Which brings me to the second reason. It’s a well-known adage in the West that ‘it is better to be the big frog in a small pond.’ I grew up in Shanghai, and I wasn’t really familiar with this idiomatic expression until I arrived in the U.S. Nonetheless, I am well aware of frog-pond quandaries each time I encountered them. “What’s interesting is that cultures around the world have come up with a myriad of metaphors,” Wu continued. “They all recognize the same decision dilemma, but have different ways of going about it. The Chinese have a saying that ‘it’s better to be the head of a chicken than the tail of a phoenix’, whereas the Koreans sometimes acknowledge ‘it’s better to be the tail of a dragon than being the head of snake’. Be it the ‘Frog-Pond’ or the ‘Chicken-Phoenix’, these adages paint a kaleidoscopic canvas of decision-making that is culturally informed. And I thought it would be interesting to explore the diversity in frog-pond decision-making rather than just proffering a universal solution.”In their three-part study, Wu and her colleagues found that Americans were more likely than Chinese to prefer being a “big frog in a small pond” rather than a “small frog in a big pond.” When given the option of attending a top 10 ranked college while having below-average grades or attending a top 100 ranked college while having above-average grades, Americans tended to choose the second option.The study, which was published in the Social Psychological and Personality Science, examined 888 students and working adults from the U.S. and China.“We often hear about the touted benefits of being the ‘big frog in a small pond.’ But the choices we make are the products of our culture. The next time you are faced with a frog-pond dilemma, take heart that there is not one right way of choosing; nor is there a universal standard of a single rational decision to be made,” Wu said.“It is easy to have preconceived notions about cultural differences. In the psychological literature, it has been long known that East Asians (the ‘collectivists’) tend to attune to a collective self embedded in social groups, whereas Westerners (the ‘individualists’) tend to focus on an individual self as a distinctive agent. So if we just look at the overall pattern that Chinese are more likely to choose the big pond, it is tempting to think Chinese don’t want to be the big frog as much as Americans, because as a collective whole, Chinese may not want to engage in social comparison within the pond in order to preserve social harmony.”“But that was not the case. The real reason Chinese go for the big pond is that they are more concerned about prestige.”“The caveat here is that as we draw cultural delineations, it is easy to end up with a reductionist way of construing opposing schemas: West – individualism, independence, analytic thinking; East – collectivism, interdependence, holistic thinking. But cultures are complex, porous, dynamic, ever-changing,” Wu told PsyPost. “Although it might be intuitive to conjure up collectivists who are cooperative and less inclined to compare themselves with others, they are not. In fact, we found Chinese are much more likely to engage in social comparison than Americans. Other qualitative accounts have also revealed strong desire to compete and achieve even within one’s pond (you may have seen the ‘Asian grading scale’ meme – A is average, B is bad, C is crap, F is find another family).” “To fathom any cultural phenomena, we need to delve into the social structure and historical underpinnings of the culture of study, and be willing to entertain possibilities beyond the individualism-collectivism dichotomy. Otherwise we might end up with an impoverished understanding with a specious reasoning.”“If cultures across the globe differ in their propensity to choose the “big pond”, what does this mean as the world becomes more globalized and when cultures interact? Over the past ten years, U.S. colleges witnessed a dramatic 85% increase of international students, a majority of whom hail from Asia. Coming from cultures that place a heavy emphasis on prestige and obtaining an elite education, it makes sense for Asian internationals to vie for the big pond. “In fact, many Chinese international students have gone to great lengths to get into (or help their children get into) top U.S. colleges,” Wu told PsyPost. “But what appears to be a culturally normative choice in China may not be one in the U.S. If you look at top executives at Fortune 100 companies from 1980 to 2011, the percentage of those with an Ivy League undergraduate degree has decreased. If you didn’t come from a big pond, you can still do well in life. “This doesn’t mean that people should give up on their pursuit of the big pond all together, but it pays to think twice about consequences of being the small frog: sinking to the bottom of the class risking being expelled, language difficulties, mental health struggles. At the end of the day, is it worth choosing the big pond – in a cultural context where big frogs in small ponds can also succeed?”The study, “Frogs, Ponds, and Culture: Variations in Entry Decisions“, was also co-authored by Stephen M. Garcia and Shirli Kopelman.last_img read more

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