The Mitie short: Hedge funds including Marshall Wace and Old Mutual bet on more share price falls at outsourcing group

Sponsored Sunday 19 March 2017 5:05 pm The Mitie short: Hedge funds including Marshall Wace and Old Mutual bet on more share price falls at outsourcing group Share Read This NextIf You’re Losing Hair in This Specific Spot, It Might Be a Thyroid IssueVegamourTop 5 Tips If You’re Losing Your EyebrowsVegamourWhat Causes Hair Loss? Every Trigger ExplainedVegamourSmoking and Hair Loss: Are They Connected?VegamourThis Is How Often You Should Cut Your HairVegamourWant Thicker Hair? Follow These 12 StepsVegamourHow Often Can You Dye Your Hair?VegamourTips & Tricks for Styling Thin HairVegamour16 Foods to Grow Your Healthiest Hair EverVegamour Read more: Mitie flogs its healthcare business for just £2Markit data, reported on by the Sunday Times, shows the percentage of Mitie shares on loan, indicative of the level of bets on share price falls, reached 18.4 per cent last week.ShortTracker puts the figure at closer to 15 per cent, but both datasets identify Mitie as the fourth most-shorted stock in London.It has been a troubling start to 2017 for Mitie. In January, the company’s new chief executive Phil Bentley ordered KPMG to conduct an external review of its accounts.Read more: Mighty fall for Mitie as share price dives after it warns on profits again whatsapp Hedge funds are anticipating further falls in the share price of troubled outsourcing firm Mitie.Marshall Wace, Old Mutual and Henderson Global Investors are among the investors to have disclosed short positions on the company. Also in January, the firm issued its third profit warning in four months. The firm’s share price, 204p on Friday, is down nine per cent since the beginning of the year and 27 per cent on this point last year.[charts-share-price id=”756″] Tags: Asset management Company Mitie Group read more

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Hong Kong stock exchange boss questions ‘one country, two systems’

first_imgCharles Li, head of the Hong Kong stock exchange (HKEX), has publicly questioned the “one country, two systems” framework governing the territory’s relationship with mainland China. Hong Kong has been wracked by often-violent anti-government protests for months, sparked by a proposed bill that would have allowed suspects to be extradited to mainland China, and was seen by demonstrators as an erosion of the territory’s autonomy. “That lack of trust is a key reason why China is reluctant to give Hong Kong people…  self-determination — two systems,” he said. Tags: Hong Kong London Stock Exchange Group Anna Menin In a speech in London last night, Li said the model had “fundamental flaws” in how it was implemented from the outset, the Financial Times reported. He said that if the city’s residents want to use political rights “to oppose China’s sovereignty” over the city, “that’s a dead end”, but if Hong Kongers want to use them to solve local issues, Beijing “shouldn’t have a problem”. Read more: Hong Kong abandons £32bn bid for London Stock Exchange Read more: Carrie Lam: Hong Kong set to record negative growth in 2019 In his speech last night, Li said “the only thing” Hong Kongers were denied under the “one country, two systems” framework is “political rights”. Wednesday 30 October 2019 9:37 am HKEX abandoned its bid for LSE after the London bourse rejected the offer outright earlier this month. whatsapp Concerns had been raised that the offer would not receive regulatory approval as Hong Kong’s government, which answers to Beijing, appoints the majority of HKEX’s board members. Although the bill was scrapped earlier this month, the protests have evolved into calls for greater freedom from Beijing. HKEX is attempting to cement its position as the west’s gateway into the Chinese market, but faces stiff competition from Shanghai and Shenzen. Share “One country, two systems” is the model under which the financial hub was granted a degree of autonomy after it was returned to Chinese rule in 1997. Li’s comments come shortly after concerns about HKEX’s autonomy from Beijing helped scupper its unsolicited £32bn bid for the London Stock Exchange (LSE), which the bourse abandoned earlier this month. Speaking at the London Metal Exchange’s annual dinner, Li said mainland China had never trusted the people of Hong Kong to respect the “one country” aspect of the framework. Hong Kong stock exchange boss questions ‘one country, two systems’ whatsapplast_img read more

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Digital ad firm Dianomi plots £70m London stock market float

first_img Its clients include seven of the world’s top 10 largest asset management companies, seven of the top 10 largest wealth management firms in the US and half of the top 10 largest Wall Street banks. Dianomi specialises in online native advertising for financial services clients (Getty Images) Share Native advertising allows brands to place text or video promotions such as advertorials that match the format of the publisher’s platform. Revenue is generated on a per-click or per-view basis. whatsapp Dianomi, which specialises in paid content for financial services clients, is targeting a £70m valuation and aiming to raise £25m through listing on London’s Aim market this month. Tuesday 4 May 2021 2:14 pm Dianomi also said it was well positioned for future growth due to a lack of reliance on third-party cookies, which are being phased out by major platforms such as Google amid an overhaul of how advertisers track consumers online. The company, which was founded in 2003, enables brands to deliver so-called native advertising on publishers including Reuters, Bloomberg and the Wall Street Journal. whatsapp It follows a strong year of growth for the company, which pulls in the majority of its revenue from the US. Total revenue grew almost 60 per cent last year to £28.4m, while earnings rose from £250,000 to £2m.center_img Digital advertising firm Dianomi today unveiled plans for a stock market float in London, marking another boost to the City’s booming initial public offering (IPO) scene. James Warrington “With consumers now having transferred in large numbers to reading news online via phone, tablet or laptop, this has created significant sustainable organic growth for Dianomi, as well as opportunities to expand our presence in the mobile and video segments alongside entering new sectors where our premium positioning can naturally transfer,” Hodson said. Chief executive Rupert Hodson said the IPO would help Dianomi cash in on growing demand for digital ad services among financial services clients, as well the ongoing shift to online news consumption. Dianomi specialises in online native advertising for financial services clients (Getty Images) Also Read: Digital ad firm Dianomi plots £70m London stock market float Digital ad firm Dianomi plots £70m London stock market float Dianomi specialises in online native advertising for financial services clients (Getty Images) Also Read: Digital ad firm Dianomi plots £70m London stock market float Panmure Gordon is acting as nominated adviser, sole broker and sole bookrunner on the listing. Show Comments ▼ Tags: IPOslast_img read more

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Is Covid-19 growing less lethal? The infection fatality rate says ‘no’

first_img [email protected] Privacy Policy Knowing the true infection fatality rate (IFR), a key focus of research for one of us (D.L.R.), is essential in assessing whether regions are seeing improvements in the timeliness and effectiveness of Covid-19 treatment and, if they aren’t, rapidly identifying and implementing better practices.advertisement Recent reports have suggested that Covid-19 has become markedly less lethal in the United States. Our analysis of death rates and infection fatality rates from Arizona, the U.S. as a whole, and New York City shows it isn’t, indicating that public health measures to reduce infections should not be relaxed.Determining the true fatality rate can also help identify why more people with Covid-19 are not benefiting from advances in care.As of late July, the state of Arizona was reporting a fatality rate of 2.1% among people who contracted Covid-19. That is markedly lower than reports in the spring from areas such as New York City, which saw fatality rates as high as 10%.advertisement [email protected] First OpinionIs Covid-19 growing less lethal? The infection fatality rate says ‘no’ Douglas L. Rothman Please enter a valid email address. Pima County Medical Examiner Dr. Greg Hess walks out of the overflow body storage cooler at the medical examiner’s office in Tucson, Ariz., in late July. Matt York/AP Newsletters Sign up for First Opinion A weekly digest of our opinion column, with insight from industry experts. Infection fatality rate estimatesArizona, July 2020National, Spring 2020Meta-analysis, Spring 20200%1%RegionPercentRegionInfection fatality rateArizona, July 20200.63%National, Spring 20200.65%Meta-analysis, Spring 20200.68%Infection fatality rate estimates Ratio of deaths to hospitalizationsArizonaNew York City0 to 1718 to 4445 to 6565+All0%10%20%30%40%50%60%Age groupsPercentAge groupArizonaNew York City0 to 175%2%18 to 4411%8%45 to 6527%23%65+47%49%All31%34%New York City By Douglas L. Rothman, Jessica E. Rothman, and Gerard Bossard Aug. 24, 2020 Reprints Patrick Skerrett / STAT Source: Douglas L. Rothman It is unlikely that Arizona is an exceptional case: other states experiencing large increases in cases and fatalities since late June have reported similar fatality rates.If Covid-19 is not becoming less deadly, what explains the five-fold lower reported fatality rate in Arizona now compared to New York City in the spring? The most likely explanation is that the large increase in testing since the spring has increased the number of diagnosed cases several fold. The reported fatality rate is calculated by dividing the number of deaths by the number of diagnosed cases. A larger number of diagnosed cases due to more testing would decrease the reported fatality rate. This conclusion is consistent with a CDC report that the true number of infections was underestimated in the U.S. during the March-to-May period by as much as 10 fold. Leave this field empty if you’re human: Given progress in the diagnosis and treatment of Covid-19, why has there been no apparent improvement in the infection fatality rate? The two main possibilities are that the improvements that have been made in treating Covid-19 are not enough to make a detectable difference in the infection fatality rate, or that a large fraction of those who die of Covid-19 do not get to the hospital in time for successful treatment. We were, unfortunately, unable to find the fatality rate of patients who were hospitalized. Such data would help distinguish between these possibilities.We recommend that all states implement procedures to track the ratio of deaths to hospitalizations, as well as implement random testing studies to accurately track infection fatality rates. Without this vital information, our ability to improve the health infrastructure to treat Covid-19 is handcuffed and may well lead to deaths that could otherwise have been prevented.Douglas L. Rothman is a professor of radiology and biomedical engineering at Yale School of Medicine. Jessica E. Rothman is a graduate student in biostatistics at Yale School of Public Health. Gerard Bossard is a freelance writer.Editor’s note: The article was updated to clarify the difference between the true infection fatality rate and the reported fatality rate. The supposed reduction in lethality of Covid-19 has been largely attributed to improvements in treatments; earlier identification of Covid-19 infections, allowing for rapid medical intervention; and protection from infection of older higher-risk individuals. It also could be explained by increased testing, which would identify more mild and asymptomatic cases, leading to a lower reported fatality rate. The infection fatality rate represents the percentage of all people infected with Covid-19 who die from the disease. Getting a solid handle on the IFR is critical for accurate Covid-19 hospitalization and fatality projections, which are needed to guide public health measures.To gauge possible changes in the lethality of Covid-19, we made a conservative estimate of the infection fatality rate in Arizona, which has seen the majority of its cases and fatalities since late June. We chose Arizona based on its excellent Department of Health Services data reporting site and its state-of-the-art hospital care system. We compared our estimate to the best estimate of the infection fatality rate across the United States by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) from data obtained earlier in the pandemic, primarily the spring of 2020.To determine the infection fatality rate in Arizona, we divided the percentage of the state’s population who had died from Covid-19 as of July 30, 2020, by the 12.9% of the population that was infected based on antibody testing between July 20 and July 26, 2020. Antibody testing captures the total percentage of the population that had been infected with Covid-19 from the beginning of the outbreak. We then calculated and applied a standard correction factor for the delay between case diagnosis and death. This yielded an infection fatality rate of 0.63%, which is not significantly different from the CDC’s best estimate of 0.65% for the U.S. in the Spring of 2020. About the Authors Reprints Winter is coming: Why America’s window of opportunity to beat back Covid-19 is closing Patrick Skerrett / STAT Source: Douglas L. Rothman A similar value, 0.68%, was reported from an extensive meta-analysis of published reports from the United States and other developed countries through May 2020.To independently assess if Covid-19 has become less lethal, we compared the ratio of deaths to hospitalizations reported by Arizona with the ratio reported by New York City. This comparison is independent of accurately knowing the percentage of the infected population. We chose New York City because it was among the earliest and hardest hit regions in the U.S., so improvements in the effectiveness and timeliness of treatments since then should be easily detected. There was surprisingly little difference in this ratio overall and within age groups, as shown in the chart below. Tags Coronaviruspublic health [email protected] Gerard Bossard Related: Jessica E. Rothmanlast_img read more

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‘Patient friction coefficient’ can gauge the burden of participating in a clinical trial

first_img linkedin.com/in/murray-aitken-iqviainstitute/ Related: [email protected] The rigor and complexity needed to generate measurable results from clinical trials often makes them difficult for patients to participate in. And that’s a problem for the biopharma industry.The more complex a trial is and the more procedures performed per patient visit are both associated with higher failure rates for recruitment, randomization, and retention.Despite knowing that-less burdensome protocols would help optimize trial designs, accelerate recruitment, and reduce attrition, sponsors have struggled to bring the patient perspective into the trial design conversation. Their lack of success is due in part to how differently the two groups communicate.advertisement This metric can give trial developers the information they need to quantify which patient burdens will have the biggest impact on their recruiting and retention goals and make changes to ease those burdens without affecting trial results.How the patient friction coefficient worksDevelopers generally assume that taking part in a clinical trial adds some incremental burden for participants. The patient friction coefficient framework makes it possible to quantify that impact by testing how much of the perceived burden of participation exceeds the burden an individual already experiences from treatment. It can also quantify individual’s perceptions of the benefits of participation that that offset burdens, such as the option to receive infusions at home that aren’t routinely part of existing treatment, being provided with transportation to and from study visits, or more frequent interactions with specialists.The patient friction coefficient assessment considers various elements that can affect an individual’s willingness to participate in a clinical trial, including time and travel burdens, invasive procedures, and concerns about replacing their current treatment and trusted physician with an unknown treatment and care team.Source: David Cameron and colleagues, Clinical Therapeutics Patients and caregivers are surveyed using the patient friction coefficient assessment tool about how the protocol of a trial would affect their willingness to participate in it. The protocol is then assigned a patient friction score. At the same time, real-world data are used to characterize the type and frequency of procedures performed in the clinical setting for the target patient population.This relatively simple patient-centric formula offers researchers and trial participants several advantages: It uses available data. The grouping of variables maintains transparency and makes it straightforward to replicate and validate. And the coefficient can be calculated for an individual or a group of similar individuals, which allows planning decisions around inclusion and exclusion criteria for protocol development, among other things.Putting the patient friction coefficient to useThe insights generated by the patient friction coefficient make it possible for trial sponsors to rapidly determine which protocol design decisions positively or negatively affect recruiting and retention, how significant the impact will be, and how those risks vary across patient populations. For example, travel times may be only a minor burden to participants who live within a 25-mile radius of the trial center or for those who own a car. But it may be substantial enough to prevent participation for those who live farther away or rely on public transportation. Similarly, working professionals may perceive weekly site visits as overly burdensome, whereas older patients may be accustomed to this cadence of health care engagements. Women and Black patients are poorly represented in clinical trials, analysis finds About the Authors Reprints By David Cameron and Murray Aitken Oct. 30, 2020 Reprints Scientists like their insights captured via validated instruments that organize data into quantifiable outputs that can be measured and managed. Patients want to tell stories, share anecdotes, and talk about the qualitative factors that affect their quality of life. These disparate communication preferences have made it difficult for the two groups to engage, or for scientists to translate those qualitative stories into systematic assessments that quantify the burden placed on study volunteers.That may be changing.advertisement David Cameron linkedin.com/in/cdavidcameron/ Tags patientscenter_img New research shows older adults are still often excluded from clinical trials @IQVIA_global [email protected] Adobe First Opinion‘Patient friction coefficient’ can gauge the burden of participating in a clinical trial Related: Murray Aitken @IQVIA_global Over the past two years, we have been part of a team of researchers from Tufts University’s Center for the Study of Drug Development and from IQVIA that has been developing a new metric called the patient friction coefficient, which we described recently in the journal Clinical Therapeutics. This data-informed measure characterizes and quantifies the potential burden of participating in a clinical trial. The tool offers a logical and validated method to capture information about burden at every stage of the clinical trial experience for each potential participant, from the point at which they first learn about a research opportunity, through recruiting, participation, and follow-up once the trial is complete. The patient friction coefficient introduces the patient experience into the trial design process in a scientifically valid way. It gives researchers a way to evaluate their protocol design choices through the lens of patient burden and to score their options for straightforward and robust comparisons. By introducing a measure of burden into the trial design process, they can create more patient-centric experiences that will ultimately help accelerate recruiting and improve retention.The tool can also play an important role in engaging with potential trial participants. Adopting this tool opens lines of communication between participants and trial designers and can establish clearer expectations about requirements for trial participation and how they differ from normal clinical care.All of these benefits can help lower recruiting costs, reduce the risk of attrition, and support a faster path to market.At first, users will likely employ the coefficient retrospectively to identify factors that contributed to low enrollment and retention in past trials, as a way to learn lessons from mistakes and inform future protocol design policies.Over time, it will be used during protocol planning and design to reduce or offset — and ultimately avoid — inefficient practices and better predict clinical trial performance.We believe this framework will help change the fundamental culture around trial design by making the patient perspective an inherent part of every protocol conversation. Since patient friction coefficient values are comparable across trials, ascribing one to a trial will call out patient burden as an essential design variable.For several years, the pharmaceutical industry has tried to become more “patient focused.” Many clinical trial sponsors have made bold declarations about treating patients as stakeholders and incorporating their feedback into protocol designs to reduce the burden of participating in clinical trials. The patient friction coefficient offers a straightforward way to do this while also making it as prominent a part of the protocol selection process as feasibility, cost, timing, and safety.Since the patient friction coefficient framework is a new metric, its developers look forward to working with innovative companies to test it against their past and future trials. We will continue to refine the features and weighting mechanisms through these early pilot projects to ensure its reliability and ease of use.We see the patient friction coefficient as a strong example of the power of human data science and proof that combining patient-level data with advanced analytics tools can yield valuable insights to improve trial design. It is one way to solve the constant challenge of meeting recruitment and retention goals.David Cameron is the senior director and global head of novel trial design at IQVIA. Murray Aitken is the executive director of the IQVIA Institute for Human Data Science.last_img read more

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All-Ireland football champions, Late Late Show appearances and startling crime – it’s our top stories of the week

first_imgHome We Are Laois All-Ireland football champions, Late Late Show appearances and startling crime – it’s… We Are Laois By Siun Lennon – 31st March 2019 Twitter Facebook Twitter Pinterest WhatsApp Pinterest Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory WhatsApp All-Ireland football champions, Late Late Show appearances and startling crime – it’s our top stories of the week Previous articleLaois’s St Brigids crowned Leinster camogie league championsNext articleClare just pip past Laois Ladies in national league battle Siun Lennonhttp://heresosiun.blogspot.ie/2016/09/the-lekkie-piccie-experience.htmlSiún Lennon joined LaoisToday in a full-time capacity after studying Journalism and New Media in the University of Limerick. She hails from Rosenallis and her interests vary from news, sports and politics.center_img TAGSTop stories of the week Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results GAA RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook GAA A Portlaoise CBS group were crowned winners at the Laois Student Enterprise AwardsGardai launch investigation after Laois businessman assaulted and robbedGardai are investigating an incident which saw a Laois man assaulted and robbed on Tuesday nightSPORTDivision 3 final fixtureREVEALED: Time and date confirmed for Division 3 league final in Croke ParkAll-Ireland championsScoil Chríost Rí were crowned All-Ireland senior A champions on Saturday – and they celebrated in styleLaois U20 footballersLaois U-20 footballers announced their panel, captain and vice-captain this weekNew sponsorship deal for Laois GAALaois GAA announced a new sponsorship deal for Pitch 1 in Centre of ExcellenceHeartbreak for KnockbegThere was heartbreak for 14-man Knockbeg as their All-Ireland dreams ended on SaturdayWE ARE LAOISLaois man Michael on First DatesTwitter reacted to Laois man Michael’s First Date appearanceRemember the GameKnockbeg College see off Portlaoise CBS in 2010 2nd Year finalGood Week, Bad WeekNational awards, Laois athletes and entrepreneurial success – it’s Good Week/Bad WeekCOLUMNISTSFr PaddyThe Portlaoise priest spoke about a mother’s love being a blessingJohn Whelan‘Don’t mind what they say, of course there’s an alternative Government’SEE ALSO – Laois minor camogie top their group with four wins from four and go through to All-Ireland semi-finals NEWSAmazing Laois woman opens up about her life on the Late Late ShowAn incredible Laois woman who channelled her grief into something positive for thousands of people left the Late Late Show audience in awePortlaoise CBS entrepreneurs GAA 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshinlast_img read more

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Trial to determine who owns deceased advisor’s book

Bitcoin surge doesn’t affect damages, B.C. court says Share this article and your comments with peers on social media The question of who owns the client — an advisor, or their firm — has long bedeviled the investment industry. Now, an Ontario court says that a trial is necessary to decide the question of whether a deceased advisor’s estate has a claim to ownership of his book. The Ontario Superior Court of Justice has declined to dismiss a claim brought by the estate of a deceased advisor against his former firm over the value of his book. In its decision, the court said the defendants in the case, Union Securities Ltd., didn’t meet the onus of showing there’s no genuine issue for trial, and that “complete discoveries and a trial are needed” to determine the issue of the ownership of the accounts and, if necessary, the value of those accounts. It dismissed the firm’s motion for summary judgment. According to the decision, Allen Eisen was an investment advisor with Union Securities when he died on January 4, 2010. He had moved to Union from Research Capital Corp. in April 2009, and, at that point, entered an employment contract with the firm, which provided, among other things, that he owned his accounts and that he could sell them within the firm. When he Eisen died, his accounts were transferred to another advisor, who has since left the firm. In addition the Union has been sold to Vancouver-based PI Financial Corp., leaving it “unclear what has become of the Eisen accounts.” The court notes that the estate has asked whether the sale of the firm generated compensation for Eisen’s book, or put a specific value on those accounts. However, the court says, the firm has refused to disclose any information that would allow it to assess that value. The firm argues that the estate must first prove that it has a legal claim on the accounts before the question of their value is relevant; and, it points to an internal policy document, which “states that upon death of an investment advisor, all accounts worked by that advisor belong to Union.” It maintains that Eisen had the right to sell his book to another advisor within the firm, but that his estate doesn’t have that right. “Union says that although it was obliged to appoint an investment advisor to oversee the Eisen accounts, it was not obliged to purchase the accounts or to compensate the estate for the value of the accounts as they were already owned by Union,” the court decision says. However, the decision notes that the lawyer for the estate maintains that an asset owned by an individual generally passes to their estate. “Counsel for the plaintiff submits that while a licensed advisor may be required to supervise trades in the accounts of a deceased advisor, ownership should, in the absence of any agreement to the contrary, pass directly to the estate,” the decision says. Ultimately, the court concluded that it doesn’t have enough evidence to decide the account ownership question. “As a matter of legal logic, neither side has an argument that trumps the other,” it says. “The defendant is right that an estate is not licensed and by regulation cannot deal with the investment accounts, and, consequently, it makes no sense for trading accounts to belong to the estate of a deceased advisor. On the other hand, the plaintiff is right that ownership can be considered separate from trading authority, and, consequently, it makes no sense for accounts that belonged to an investment advisor the minute before his death to cease being property of his estate once he has died.” As a result, the court found that a trial is necessary to decide the issue. James Langton Related news Court approves data breach settlements with BMO, CIBC Keywords Lawsuits,  Books of businessCompanies PI Financial Corp. Universal life policies can’t be used for unlimited deposits, appeal court rules Facebook LinkedIn Twitter read more

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NCDA Website Providing Easy Access to Comprehensive Information on Drug Abuse

first_imgRelatedNCDA Website Providing Easy Access to Comprehensive Information on Drug Abuse NCDA Website Providing Easy Access to Comprehensive Information on Drug Abuse UncategorizedNovember 10, 2008 FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail As the nation observes National Drug Awareness Month in November, the National Council on Drug Abuse (NCDA) is working hard to make researching the subject easier.The Council’s recently launched online library service, www.ncdainfo.com, is a step in this direction. In September, the NCDA launched this service as part of the efforts to increase utilization of, and access to its resources on substance abuse.By far, the Internet has vastly transformed the way people communicate and do business. Thus, realizing the transformational role of this communication technology, the NCDA has logged on to this trend, in a bid to affirm its presence.Regionally and internationally, there is a growing need for information about the problem of drug abuse and the Jamaican response to this problem, says Director of Information and Research at the NCDA, Ellen Campbell-Grizzle.“We are a national agency to provide information so we need to expand the means by which information is accessed and we are really trying to ramp up the level of service that we offer our clients,” she states.These clients largely comprise CXC students completing school-based assessments and researchers. The NCDA Information and Research Director says that there are some 20 to 30 senior researchers who regularly utilize the services of the Library and Information Centre.The website, www.ncdainfo.com, she notes, will alleviate the cumbersome ordeal of travelling to the NCDA offices in search of a particular publication, only to learn of its unavailability. It will facilitate access to, and an extensive search of the online references of the NCDA Library, which currently houses 514 books, and other resource materials.“We are trying to provide this information to them so they can know the depth and breadth of our catalogue and what is available. Visitors to the website are now able to type in a search word on relevant topics and what will come on screen are the matches in our catalogue with topics or papers that pertains to this topic, complete with an abstract of the available paper or publication so that the researcher can know of its contents,” Mrs. Campbell-Grizzle explains.“They can then call us or make an appointment to come in and do the research and get the references or to call to make copies. What we are sure of is that they will be able to begin the discussion from a more informed position,” she confidently states, while expressing high hopes that this online offering will boost utilization of the NCDA resources.“Ultimately, what we are trying to achieve, is that having gone online and seen what we have, people will be more willing to come to our information centre located at 2-6 Melmac Avenue, (Cross Roads),” she notes.The NCDA Library provides compact and up to date information on drug abuse such as growing trends, how it is likely to impact the country’s productivity level, and its link to HIV/AIDS.“This is very important in terms of preventing and alleviating the problem of drug abuse,” states Mrs. Campbell-Grizzle.In addition, through donations from the Culture, Health, Arts, Sports and Education (CHASE) Fund, a full time librarian has joined the staff of the NCDA. This move, she informs, places the agency in good stead, to better respond to its many research requests. She advises online users to call in and speak to the librarian, once they have located the particular publication, so they can be properly guided.However, Mrs. Campbell-Grizzle quickly emphasizes, “We are not offering to do the research for them; we are offering to help that client to do a better search.” Ultimately, she stresses, the researcher will be the one conducting the research, but certainly in terms of the references that are available they can visit the website to begin.The NCDA projects huge savings in time, energy and money for its varying target audiences, as a result of this new initiative. She reports, “We have been getting more calls from researchers who have been emailing wanting to know more about the service.”“The uptake on the service is yet to be determined, but we are hoping that people will use it because of the time and energy that has gone into making it available, particularly for the students,” she adds.For rural residents who have specific research needs, the NCDA Information and Research Director is appealing to them to start utilizing this service to make their research even better. She also urges members of the public who would like to learn about licit and illicit substances, to visit the NCDA Library, which she informs is the premier library on the problem of demand reduction in the region.“Our library touches on topics such as health communication, parenting responses and behaviour change. You name it, we have it and we have most of the classic texts as well as a plethora of magazines on interdiction and punishing,” informs Mrs. Campbell-Grizzle, adding, “We are trying to expand the titles and range of our references.”She lauds the marked contribution of the CHASE Fund, which facilitated the 16-month project, through funding provided to purchase books, reference material and magazines, computer software and other resources to expand the catalogue, and implement the service.The Jamaica Library Service, she informs, has also played an integral role, especially as it relates to providing technical support and advice in getting the project online. Of note, she mentions, is the tremendous support that Jamaicans at home and abroad have provided, many of whom have donated books, coupons, and other resource materials.The NCDA is an agency of the Ministry of Health and Environment, which was established by the Government of Jamaica in 1983. The NCDA promotes drug free lifestyles through seminars, leadership development, and mass media. It utilizes an integrated demand reduction approach designed to respond to the underlying identifiable causes that lead to the drug abuse problem in Jamaica. Advertisementscenter_img RelatedNCDA Website Providing Easy Access to Comprehensive Information on Drug Abuse RelatedNCDA Website Providing Easy Access to Comprehensive Information on Drug Abuselast_img read more

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Microchip shortage to idle Windsor Assembly, Essex Engine plants

first_img The Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car ever We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles using Facebook commenting Visit our FAQ page for more information. What the global chip shortage means for the auto industry and car buyers “We’ll start looking at that just before the end of this year,” D’Agnolo said. “They haven’t given me an exact number yet.” Unifor Local 444 confirmed Thursday night that Stellantis (formerly Fiat Chrysler Automobiles) has informed them the global microchip shortage will result in the idling of the Windsor Assembly Plant for four weeks. Unifor Local 200 also confirmed Ford’s Essex Engine Plant will be down for a day April 16.The shutdown at Windsor Assembly will begin March 29 and comes only three weeks after the plant returned to operation after a three-week shutdown for the chip shortage.Stellantis’s Brampton assembly plant will also be down for three weeks next month. Chevrolet Camaro production stops due to chip shortage“It’s frustrating going into Easter Weekend going down for a month,”  said Unifor Local 444 president Dave Cassidy.“It’s not just us, it’s Brampton and a number of plants across the U.S.“Chrysler used to build  many of its own parts. This just in-time delivery is costing us untold dollars for short-term savings.“The pandemic has taught us it’s even more important that it should be made in Canada now.”Cassidy said Windsor Assembly is scheduled to resume production April 26.Stellantis official weren’t available for a comment on the shutdown Thursday night. However, earlier in the day the company confirmed the chip shortage continued to be a challenge.“We are working closely with our global supply chain network to manage the manufacturing impact caused by the global microchip shortage and will continue to make production adjustments as necessary,” said Stellantis head of communications for Canada Lou Ann Gosselin.Unifor Local 200 president John D’Agnolo said the Essex Engine Plant shutdown will cost two shifts, but added the microchip shortage will likely lead to more shutdowns in the future. Windsor’s Annex engine plant, which produces the new Godzilla 7.3-litre engine, is unaffected.The two Ford plants produce engines for the popular F-series pickup trucks, the Mustang and E-series commercial vans.“It will impact us, we just don’t how yet,” said D’Agnolo of the ongoing parts shortage.”“Obviously the company is going to look at ways of putting the engine together and, when the chips come in, they can install them.”“There’s a lot work that has to be done on the engineering side.”The Essex plant, which produces 930 engines daily, employs 835 workers. The Annex facility, which makes 640 engines daily, has 845 employees.D’Agnolo said the latest blow to an already tight microchip market came this week with a fire at a Japanese factory (Renesas Electronics) that produces about 30 per cent of the world’s microcontroller unit chips.“We’ve been told the fire in Japan will impact this industry,” D’Agnolo said.Cassidy said Stellantis officials told him the Renesas fire had no impact on the company.This is the second one-day shutdown due to the chip shortage for the Essex plant since the turn of the New Year.Ford’s Oakville assembly complex is currently operating regularly. However, Oakville has been down for six weeks since Jan. 1.The first two weeks were sales related while the last four have been due to parts shortages.General Motors announced this week its London CAMI plant, which produces the Equinox, would remain idle until mid-April because of the parts shortage.D’Agnolo said the Windsor engine plants have been fortunate to avoid more shutdowns because they’re supplying Ford’s most profitable production facilities.The two local plants supply Kentucky truck, Kansas City truck, Dearborn truck and the Ohio plant that produces the E-series commercial vans.“The most profitable vehicles will keep running,” D’Agnolo said. “Those are the plants they’re sending their chips to.“Kentucky and Kansas City truck, those places we’re sending a lot of engines to.“That’s where they make their most profitable vehicles.”D’Agnolo said even if Ford’s truck plants go down for short spells, the Windsor production is expected to continue. The company wants to ensure they have engines on hand to meet the huge appetite for trucks.“The plants we supply, if need be, we will store the engines produced,” D’Agnolo said.“We know those trucks are already sold. If they’re down for some reason, when they do get back up, they’ll be running six, seven days a week and want engines ready.”Windsor’s Annex operation is also benefitting from the popularity of its new Godzilla engine.The plant is currently operating on two, six-day-a-week and two five-day week schedules.“They’d run the plant more if they could get the chips,” D’Agnolo said.“That engine is doing very well.“The workforce has done a fabulous job hitting what they need to hit everyday. They’re beyond the numbers they were supposed to hit.”The sales of the Godzilla engine and the enduring popularity of Ford trucks add up to good news for Windsor.D’Agnolo said the Annex plant is on schedule to add a third shift in 2022. 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“Scout's Honor” Screening At CU-Boulder March 21

first_img Published: March 11, 2001 A screening of “Scout’s Honor,” a film that tells the story of a 12-year-old scout who launched a nationwide challenge to anti-gay policies of the Boy Scouts of America, is set for March 21 at 7 p.m. at the University of Colorado at Boulder. The film recently won two top awards at the Sundance Film Festival. The screening will be in the Eaton Humanities Building, room 150. Filmmaker Tom Shepard, a Hearst Professional-in-Residence at CU-Boulder’s School of Journalism and Mass Communication, will provide commentary on the work of the film and will take questions from the audience. Marguerite Moritz, associate dean of the school, was the writer on “Scout’s Honor,” co-winner of the audience award for Best Documentary and co-winner of the Freedom of Expression Award. “Tom Shepard is one of the best up-and-coming documentary filmmakers in the country and it’s a pleasure to have him here on the campus as a visiting professional,” Moritz said. “His insights and abilities with the cinematic process are outstanding, and I’m sure our students will benefit from seeing his work and having him see theirs.” “The film is outstanding and is being recognized at festivals in the United States and Europe. It’s actually having a phenomenal run, so again, it’s wonderful for us to have this happening on campus.” A reception will be held prior to the screening at 6 p.m. in the lobby of the Eaton Humanities building. Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more

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