P. Diddy Denied A Puff Daddy Twitter Handle

first_imgAfter 10 plus years as P. Diddy, Sean Combs decided that the grass is not always greener on the other side, and he would like to be called Puff Daddy once more.There’s just one little problem, the sharks swarmed and stole all the good Puff Daddy twitter handles. What’s a man to do when he can’t find a preferred twitter handle? While we’re fairly certain that this is a humorous prank by the good folks at Funny or Die, we couldn’t help but indulge. Photo and story credit to Funny Or Die.last_img read more

Read More

Weezer Fan Tries To Scalp Tickets, But Justice Was Served

first_imgWeezer has just announced their first album, Everything Will Be Alright In The End, since 2010, and simultaneously announced a tour of intimate venues, with full performances of the new work. Naturally, tickets to these shows sold out quickly, considering the small venue capacity and reasonable ticket prices ($65 each).So, when one fan took to Craigslist to scalp the tickets for the band’s show at The Sinclair in Boston, to the tune of $250 per ticket, the internet responded.Whoever is selling 2 @Weezer tickets on Craigslist for $500 is the scum of the earth. http://t.co/cBhvywGwWR pic.twitter.com/JT6MPouY9F— Craig Silva (@craignb) September 29, 2014The tweet was recognized by Boston.com writer Luke O’Neil, who both wrote an article on the scalping and posted the following reply:Hey the @TheSinclair can you figure out who this is then ban him for life? @craignb @Weezer cc: @cplavin— luke oneil (@lukeoneil47) September 29, 2014The original poster, Craig Silva, dug up some more info about the scalper:@lukeoneil47 @thesinclair @weezer @cplavin PS guys name is Daniel and his # is 6319658129 haha (via/ CL)— Craig Silva (@craignb) September 29, 2014And The Sinclair finally responded:@lukeoneil47 @craignb @Weezer @cplavin Hard to make $500 off tickets when the order is cancelled. pic.twitter.com/XOXbO9gDuL— The Sinclair (@TheSinclair) September 29, 2014Boom. Roasted.Even Weezer frontman Rivers Cuomo commented on the whole scenario, reposting O’Neil’s article and thanking the venue for their act against scalping.“Dude Scalps Weezer Tickets for $500, Gets Swift Internet Justice.” http://t.co/ug8RUSciy1    Thanks, @TheSinclair  @lukeoneil47  !— Rivers Cuomo (@RiversCuomo) September 30, 20Can someone do this for Phish Vegas tickets please?last_img read more

Read More

Updates from the Armchair: This Week in iRacing (July 31, 2018)

first_imgXfinity Series driver Spencer Boyd’s no stranger to iRacing, and he enjoyed some time in the motion simulator this week. Jordan E. created an iRacing version of Elliott Sadler’s Xfinity Series car racing at Watkins Glen and Kansas.DON’T TRY THIS AT HOMEWe’ve all had days where we wanted to climb the fence and go home. Fans had some fun running laps with Gragson and NASCAR Next driver Will Rodgers in advance of their races at Pocono Raceway this past weekend. Unfortunately for Gragson, illness kept him out of his Kyle Busch Motorsports truck at Pocono Saturday — but at least he logged some laps on iRacing for next time. Bubba Wallace, too, hit up Twitter in search of iRacing drivers looking to turn some laps on the dirt. NASCAR PEAK ANTIFREEZE iRACING SERIES UPDATEWho doesn’t like a first-time winner? Lockdown Racing’s Jimmy Mullis claimed his first-ever NASCAR PEAK Antifreeze iRacing Series victory at New Hampshire Motor Speedway Tuesday. Early in the race, it looked like Michael Conti could have claimed his third checkered flag in Loudon, N.H., but lost time after a botched pit stop.Following New Hampshire, Slip Angle Motorsports teammates Ray Alfalla and Bobby Zalenski swapped the top two points positions, moving three-time champion Alfalla back to the top. The NASCAR PEAK Antifreeze iRacing Series resumes action at Pocono Raceway August 7. Cody Byus won last year’s race from the pole, but hasn’t started a race since April.iRACING PAINT SCHEMES OF THE WEEKBubba Wallace showed his excitement racing a Justin Kruithof-created dirt late model version of Wallace’s Richard Petty Motorsports Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series ride. William Byron’s journey is the canonical iRacing-to-pro story. NASCAR on FOX’s Regan Smith spoke with Byron about his rise to the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series. Wow, a different type of “You up?” text from Noah Gragson! This time, the Camping World Truck Series driver solicited some companionship on Twitter in the form of iRacing competitors.last_img read more

Read More

Bontrager gets brighter w/ Flare RT, Ion 200 RT, & Ion Pro RT Daytime…

first_imgThe light integration on the Bontrager Circuit is actually pretty interesting, as the Blendr mounts are magnetically attached to the helmet. That means you can attach any Flare light to the mounts, then snap them on or off the helmet using the built in magnets. As long as the lights are small like the Flare series, the magnets firmly hold the lights in place, but should you crash, they’ll easily pop off to prevent injury from snagging on an object during the crash.pic by ©kramonWeighing in at just 33g, the Flare RT alone runs $59.99.Flare RT SpecsSpecifically designed focus, flash, and range for ultimate daytime visibility Interruptive flash pattern produces up to 90 Lumens for ultimate daytime visibilityIntegrated light sensor auto-adjusts brightness to your environmentConnect with Garmin® and Bontrager ANT+ devices for always on, battery status, and controlFlash modes: 90LM-6hrs, 45LM-12hrs, 5LM-15hrs Steady modes: 25LM-4.5hrs, 5LM-13.5hrsConfidently ride through wet conditions with an updated USB port and IPX7 waterproof ratingBattery save mode provides 30 minutes of additional runtime when battery life reaches 5%Includes Flare RT, front Quick Connect bracket, and mini USB charging cable If you’re still not using daytime running lights while out on the road, it’s probably time to start. According to an ongoing research partnership between Trek and Clemson University, the use of daytime running lights are linked to a 33% reduction in accidents between cyclists and cars. Not to mention that a flashing rear light apparently makes a cyclist a whopping 270% more recognizable to drivers. With numbers like that, it’s pretty motivating to slap a light on your bike before you head out the door. And to make that process easier, Bontrager has unveiled a new line of RT Daytime Running Lights with more power in a smaller form, plus a number of cool features.pic by ©kramonFlare RTRepresenting an update to the popular Flare R, the new Flare RT is 36% smaller, 30% more powerful, and has 20% more battery life. Additionally, there is a new USB charging port that features better IPX7 waterproofing, a built in light sensor to adjust the lumens based on the ambient light conditions, a lock mode to keep it in the preferred setting, and Blendr integration to fit on products like the new Bontrager Circuit MIPS, or the new Trek Madone seatpost. Additional features include a specific interruptive flash pattern with a maximum 90 lumen pop to get drivers’ attention, and ANT+ compatibility to allow control with your Garmin, GPS, etc. tech-photoshoot2018 Trek Emonda ALR & Madonepic by ©kramonIon 200 RTTo match the Flare RT, the Ion 200 RT includes all of the same features, just in a compact 32g package with 200 lumens of light for the front. Both lights are said to be visible from 2km away and have been optimized for daytime use. You can buy the Ion 200 RT for $59.99 each, or you can get a Flare RT/Ion 200 RT package for $114.99.Ion 200 RT SpecsSpecifically designed focus, flash, and range for ultimate daytime visibilityFlare RT provides ultimate visibility for any road, city, or pathIon 200 RT provides 200 Lumens of visibility via high-power CREE LED bulbsIntegrated light sensor auto-adjusts brightness to your environmentConnect with Garmin® and Bontrager ANT+ devices for always on, battery status, and wireless controlEasily attaches to your handlebars, helmet, or bike mountIncludes Ion 200 RT, Flare RT, Quick Connect Mounts, and mini USB charging cablecenter_img Ion Pro RTThe third addition to the line up is the Ion Pro RT. While the other two are definitely “to be seen” lights, this one has “to see with” kind of power. Featuring 1300 lumens of maximum power out of the Cree LED, the light comes in at 183g for $99.99. You can also buy it as a package with the Flare RT for $154.99.Ion Pro RT SpecsIon Pro RT provides a powerful beam that lights up the full width of any road or trailFlare RT provides ultimate visibility for any road, city, or pathConnect with Garmin® and Bontrager ANT+ devices for always on, battery status, and wireless controlSpecifically designed focus, flash, and range flash patterns for daytime visibility for up to 2kmDouble-click on switch eliminates accidental operation and battery depletion during transportEasily attaches to your handlebars, helmet, or bike mountlast_img read more

Read More

Cobb saddles up with new Randee’ for going long

first_imgJohn Cobb has spent over two years developing the all new Randee’ saddle, the second offering in the Cobb brand’s JOF (Just Off Front) line-up. Randee’ (the apostrophe is deliberate) is short for Randanneur… ‘designed for the long distance riders, the riders that go out and ride several hundred miles over a weekend, Gran Fondo riders that like to put in hard fast miles.’This short nosed saddle uses a new base design and new material selections. Cobb notes that the Randee’ saddle gives ‘unmatched adjustability and a wide 155mm rear support area.’ The nose is only 48mm wide so that as the rider positions themselves ‘just off the front’ on the seat, there is no chaffing but plenty of pressure relief and support.Lightweight at 306g, this new saddle has a deep curved rear that makes it be a product of choice for Ironman racing or all day touring.Founded in 2009, Cobb Cycling offers a full line of bicycle seats for all riders, whether they are at professional or amateur levels. John Cobb’s innovative seat designs ‘provide increased comfort, impacting speed and performance.’ Cobb Cycling is a privately held company headquartered in Tyler, Texas.www.CobbCycling.com Relatedlast_img read more

Read More

Tokyo 2020 releases latest Odaiba Marine Park water test results

first_imgThe Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games (Tokyo 2020) has announced the results of the water quality and temperature surveys from July/August this year. The tests were conducted at Odaiba Marine Park, the venue for the Tokyo 2020 marathon swimming and triathlon events.The test results revealed that, with the exception of one day during the 12-day period of the test events (from August 7-18), the use of underwater screens reduced the quantity of coliform bacteria inside the screened areas. This was within the limits stipulated by the relevant international federations.However, the organising committee noted that levels outside the screened area did exceed the targeted levels on four of the days owing to heavy rainfall.The levels of enterococci bacteria within the screened area were also within agreed limits. Tokyo 2020 plans to deploy triple-layer underwater screens during the Tokyo 2020 Games. This aims to provide ‘even better conditions than those resulting from the single screens used in the latest survey.’The surveys were once again conducted on days that corresponded to the scheduled dates of the Olympic and Paralympic Games Tokyo 2020. During those periods there were no instances where the maximum water temperature of 31.0C was exceeded in any of the measured areas. The maximum temperature recorded was 30.8C, and the water temperature inside the screens was on average approximately 0.8C higher than the temperature outside.Based on the results of these latest surveys, Tokyo 2020 will ‘continue to make all possible efforts in their preparations to ensure that all athletes can perform at their best.’www.triathlon.org Relatedlast_img read more

Read More

Mission advances developer’s proposal for new 141-unit retirement community on former JCPenney call center site; public hearing set for March

first_imgDial Retirement Communities is currently building its second facility in the metro area, called Silvercrest at College View, at College Boulevard and Pflumm in Lenexa. It’s expected to open in June. The company is looking to add another development to its portfolio in Mission.By Jerry LaMartinaRegister to continuelast_img

Read More

Prairie Village woman’s 2019 disappearance the focus of NBC Dateline investigation airing Friday

first_imgThe disappearance of Angela Green, a Prairie Village woman, is set to be the focus of a Dateline episode on NBC that will air this Friday.The episode, entitled “Hope Whispers,” is centered on the case of Angela Green, whose disappearance in June, 2019, remains a mystery. The 52-year-old was last seen along the 7600 block of Tomahawk Rd. in Prairie Village.Ellie Green, Angela’s daughter, talks to NBC News’ Keith Morrison about her mother’s disappearance for the Dateline episode. Ellie has maintained she believes her mother died of a stroke in July, 2019, a month after she went missing and after Ellie says her father, Geoffrey Green, told her her mother had been admitted to a mental institution.Inconsistencies in the story she said her father told her about Angela’s death, including that Angela had run away, led Ellie to file a missing person’s report in February, 2020. Although the Prairie Village Police Department has exhausted around 200 leads, Ellie is holding onto hope that her mother is still alive and has made repeated efforts to publicize her mother’s case.“As many possibilities as anyone else can think of, I’ve thought of all those and more,” Ellie told the Shawnee Mission Post earlier this year. “I hope she’s out there, and she’s safe. But the likelihood of that is not super high.”The Dateline episode, which will air at 9 p.m. Central Standard Time on Friday, Oct. 30, will also feature Angela’s niece Michelle Guo.A preview of the episode can be found online here.last_img read more

Read More

Researchers’ preclinical trial upends conventional wisdom about responses to fear

first_imgShare LinkedIn Fear. You’ve been there: Your heart races, even jumps to your throat. Your hands grow clammy and your stomach churns. Your mind goes blank.Rats have been there, too. We don’t know their feelings, of course, but we do know their response: They freeze in their tracks. Or at least that’s been the consensus among scientists since 1899, when experimental psychologist Willard Stanton Small first noted the behavior.But now new research led by Rebecca Shansky, assistant professor of psychology at Northeastern University, upends that conventional wisdom. Share on Facebook In a study recently published in the online journal eLife, Shansky’s team found that female rats often respond to fear by “darting.” “They start running around like crazy,” Shansky says. “It looks like they’re trying to escape.”In addition, the darting rats were more successful at integrating a process that suppressed the fear response, says Shansky, exhibiting a “cognitive flexibility” that the freezers lacked.The findings not only raise questions about the veracity of previous studies that rely on freezing to indicate fear. They could also lead to better treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder, a condition that, in the U.S. alone, affects about 8 mil-lion adults during a given year, according to the National Center for PTSD of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.“If we can harness whatever is going on when an animal becomes a darter,” says Shansky, “we could try to apply that to treatments.”Shansky had not set out to challenge a century-old assumption. Rather, she stumbled across the findings while performing a common behavioral test called “fear conditioning” in an effort to see how individual males and females differed in their fear responses, and to explore what brain changes related to those differences.The test involved teaching the animals to associate a tone with a foot shock, and then–with a video camera connected to a computer–measuring the duration of their reaction as the training proceeded. “Animals who exhibit low levels of freezing would traditionally be interpreted as either not learning or naturally fear-less,” says Shansky.Because computers may mistake sleeping for freezing, graduate student Tina Gruene, PhD’19, watched the videos afterward as a backup check. What she saw shocked her: Scores of the female rats not only didn’t freeze at the sound of the tone; they darted hither and yon, as if looking for an exit.What did that mean? The study had a large number of rats–120 as opposed to the standard 20–so Shansky set out to quantify the behavior. “We wanted to see if this was something real,” she says.The researchers fed the videos into a behavioral analysis program that tracks motion to monitor the velocity of the animals’ movement. Their plotted graphs confirmed their hunch: Darting was not a sign of fearlessness or an inability to learn. It was just as much a learned response as freezing.“The learning curve for darting was the same as the learning curve for freezing,” says Shansky, pointing to graphics in the paper. “But we saw it almost exclusively in the females–more than 40 percent of them.”The findings go beyond clarifying differences in fear behavior among male and female rats. They also point to possibilities for better treatments for people with PTSD.Following the fear conditioning, the researchers used a process called “extinction” to suppress the rats’ fear response: By playing the tone repeatedly without the shock, a “good” memory may come to replace the bad one. Extinction is akin to exposure therapy for people with PTSD. Exposure therapy works, but not for everyone: it’s effective in only about 50 percent of cases, according to numerous studies, and it has a very high dropout rate.The darters, it turned out, were more successful at extinction than the freezers, suggesting that the neurobiological processes of the males and females differed; the females, it appeared, had an edge. “Females may have developed adaptive strategies to fearful events,” says Shansky.The results raise the question of whether PTSD treatments for women–who develop the disorder twice as frequently as men–should be different from those for men. Even more radically: Might it be possible to develop a therapy that alters the neural circuits of freezers to more closely resemble those of darters?Shansky expresses the speculation more succinctly: “What if we could turn freezers into darters?” she asks.center_img Email Pinterest Share on Twitterlast_img read more

Read More

U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich Advances Legislation To Establish Tech-Transfer Maturation Program

first_imgU.S. Sen. Martin HeinrichU.S. Senate News:WASHINGTON, D.C. (July 19, 2019) – U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.) has advanced legislation to authorize an Energy Technology Maturation Program at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to facilitate successful commercialization of laboratory-developed energy technologies and boost regional, technology-driven economic impact.Senator Heinrich introduced the Energy Technology Maturation Program Act of 2019 (S. 1286) earlier this year, and on Tuesday, the bill was reported by a voice vote during a markup in the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.Senator Heinrich, a member of the committee, has led the effort to make it easier for the private sector to engage with national laboratories to commercialize innovative technology.“In New Mexico, we are proud to be home to two of the Department of Energy’s largest laboratories – Los Alamos and Sandia – that play critical roles in both national security and the development of advanced energy technologies,” Heinrich said. “This bill is a bipartisan effort to bridge the gap between lab research and development by improving the process of transferring innovative technologies – with considerable market potential – from the labs to the private sector. Providing a steady stream of technologies creates an environment that strengthens New Mexico’s economy through job creation, federal research investments, and marketable commercial products.”The effective transfer of technologies from DOE facilities to businesses that can turn them into commercial successes is an essential element of the country’s innovation ecosystem and critical to U.S. competitiveness in an increasingly demanding, technology-driven global market. Technology maturation funding accelerates the successful transfer of technologies from national laboratories and can often provide the necessary link between an innovative process for technology and a real-world application with powerful market potential.Under the Energy Technology Maturation Program, funding would be provided to help increase the maturity of technologies developed at DOE facilities with the goal of attracting a private partner that is willing to support the technology’s next steps to commercialization. The program would also provide funding to support cooperative development of a technology where a specific commercial partner has already been identified. Priority would be given to private-sector partnerships with small businesses.A copy of the Energy Technology Maturation Program Act of 2019 (S. 1286) is available HERE. The companion bill (H.R. 2495) was introduced in the House by Assistant House Speaker Ben Ray Luján and U.S. Rep. Deb Haaland.last_img read more

Read More